Michael Santoli of Barron’s makes an interesting observation:

“To some, a new job is worth nothing more than the number printed at the bottom of the pay stub, while others value employment in more emotional terms. For the stock market on Friday, each new job was granted a value of about $390,000.

That, based on some rough math, is how much the value of U.S. equities rose for each of the 308,000 net new jobs that were reported to have been created in March, as measured by the 0.9% one-day climb in the Wilshire 5000 index.”

fascinating insight . . .

Category: Finance

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2 Responses to “What’s a Job Worth? $390,000”

  1. K Harris says:

    Interesting that the $390k figure popped up. As you probably noticed, DeLong attached a $500k value to each new immigrant laborer in a recent post. In the grand scheme of things, a calculated boost go GDP coming in that close to the number that falls out from equating job gains to stock gains is pretty remarkable, to me, anyhow.

  2. K Harris says:

    Interesting that the $390k figure popped up. As you probably noticed, DeLong attached a $500k value to each new immigrant laborer in a recent post. In the grand scheme of things, a calculated boost go GDP coming in that close to the number that falls out from equating job gains to stock gains is pretty remarkable, to me, anyhow.