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Another terrific data source from the WSJ, buried online. (This is an excellent source of information, and is well worth the expense of subscribing to the online version).

“Job growth is a key issue for voters heading into this presidential election and national readings on the labor market have been painfully weak in the last two months. The latest breakdown of payrolls by state show that several key battleground states suffered some of the biggest drops in the nation in July – including Missouri and Michigan. However, Washington and Wisconsin experienced some of the highest job growth in the nation.

Here are data for 16 so-called battleground states, where thin margins in the 2000 election and possible swing voters could make all the difference on Nov. 2.” (Source: U.S. Labor Department)

  Employees on Nonfarm
Payrolls (in thousands)
Seasonally adjusted
State July June Change
Arkansas 1,152.8 1,150.9 1.9
Florida 7,442.7 7,449.1 -6.4
Iowa 1,446.2 1,444.2 2
Michigan 4,350.3 4,375.3 -25
Minnesota 2,672.7 2,675.8 -3.1
Missouri 2,681.2 2,733 -51.8
Nevada 1,136.6 1,130.3 6.3
New Hampshire 629.5 626.6 2.9
New Mexico 790.4 790.6 -0.2
Ohio 5,374.4 5,371 3.4
Oregon 1,598.2 1,597.6 0.6
Pennsylvania 5,636.8 5,639.6 -2.8
Tennessee 2,684 2,686.2 -2.2
Washington 2,717.4 2,708.8 8.6
West Virginia 733.4 732 1.4
Wisconsin 2,839.2 2,832.2 7
Total Gain/Loss     -57.4

See the full report at http://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/laus.pdf

Stastistically, this implies an Unemployment Rate (Percent) that is relatively unchanged, with an average Gain/Loss of -0.03%.

Source:
Job Growth Is Weak In Several Key States
August 20, 2004 2:19 p.m.

http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB109301461729797236,00.html

Category: Finance

Please use the comments to demonstrate your own ignorance, unfamiliarity with empirical data and lack of respect for scientific knowledge. Be sure to create straw men and argue against things I have neither said nor implied. If you could repeat previously discredited memes or steer the conversation into irrelevant, off topic discussions, it would be appreciated. Lastly, kindly forgo all civility in your discourse . . . you are, after all, anonymous.

3 Responses to “Job Growth Is Weak In Several Key States”

  1. Observing the Economy

    I am not too sure about that as I have seen the new claims numbers as an indicator of neutrality which is still bad in aggregate as there is a significant decline in workforce participation but it is at least sloping in the right direction.

  2. Observing the Economy

    I am not too sure about that as I have seen the new claims numbers as an indicator of neutrality which is still bad in aggregate as there is a significant decline in workforce participation but it is at least sloping in the right direction.

  3. Observing the Economy

    I am not too sure about that as I have seen the new claims numbers as an indicator of neutrality which is still bad in aggregate as there is a significant decline in workforce participation but it is at least sloping in the right direction.