Yet another new media taking names and kicking old media ass:

DVD sales posted huge gains in 2004 for the fifth year
running but the number of DVD players purchased for U.S. homes is slowing,
causing industry analysts to warn that sales growth of the digital discs may be
waning domestically.

Hollywood studios, which count on DVD sales and rental
revenues to offset ballooning movie budgets, basked in a record $15 billion in
DVD sales in 2004 spurred by releases of hot titles like DreamWorks Animation
SKG Inc’s "Shrek 2," while U.S. box office revenue came in a $9.4
billion.

A PriceWaterhouseCoopers report forecasts that the rate of
growth in DVD sales will slow from 23 percent in 2003 to 7 percent by 2008. Some
83 million U.S. homes had DVD players by 2004, up from 75 million in 2004,
according to PriceWaterhouseCoopers.

Source:
DVDs’ Booming Growth to Slow in U.S., Analysts Say
Gina Keating
Reuters , Thu Jan 13, 2005 06:48 PM ET

http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=industryNews&storyID=7323018

DVD continues spinning success
Mike Snider
USA TODAY, Posted Thursday, January 6, 2005, 7:00 am
http://technews.orb6.com/stories/usatoday/20050106/dvdcontinuesspinningsuccess.php

Category: Film, Finance, Music

Please use the comments to demonstrate your own ignorance, unfamiliarity with empirical data and lack of respect for scientific knowledge. Be sure to create straw men and argue against things I have neither said nor implied. If you could repeat previously discredited memes or steer the conversation into irrelevant, off topic discussions, it would be appreciated. Lastly, kindly forgo all civility in your discourse . . . you are, after all, anonymous.

One Response to “DVD Sales Boom, 2004 a Record Year”

  1. thrashbluegrass says:

    Just a thought…wouldn’t sales of DVD players slow once nearly everyone who wanted one had one? And I’m not too sure how this would lead to signifigantly lower disc sales, as people will still buy movies they wanted on DVD.

    If Hollywood truly wanted to make money on lower-budget movies, they’d start making better movies that didn’t require blowing up the entire state of Kansas for a scene.