Its a rainy day here in the NorthEast, so for those of you who remain tethered to your computers over the weekend awaiting a change in weather, here are a few things worth exploring:

• Oil has obviously been roiling the markets, and its worth peering deeper into its relationship with the economy. Here’s a wrap of recent posts, comments, charts and resources on the slippery black stuff. Most valuable post: The Oil Research Resources.

• I’ve gotten requests for some of my favorite market related blogs and resources. Instead of writing them all up. I put together a "meta page" of my favorite sources of other sources: The Meta-meta page. There are few guarantees on Wall Street, but here’s one: I personally guarantee you will find something in this collection that will become utterly invaluable to you. And, you will be dumbfounded that all this is available for absolutely free.

• Please bear with a little shameless self-promotion: The Apprenticed Investor series has developed into a fascinating area of discussion. The idea is to go beyond mere stock selection, to get at the investor behaviors that cost you money or missed opportunities. This probe into a variety of overlooked  subject matters in investing has definitely struck a nerve.  The feedback has been unlike anything else I’ve ever done on the site. Please check it out.

• A fascinating study was out this week, revealing that most Americans have a "poor grasp of economics. Go figure: Can’t invest, don’t know understand economics, and nisunderstands the concept of risk management. Is it much of a surprise that plans to privitize social security — which looked like a slam dunk post-election — are in trouble?

• Lastly, a little goofy fun:  A friend directed me to  "Vintage Stock Market Predictor Computer" up for sale on eBay. Its the very same one mentioned in Alan Abelson’s Up And Down Wall Street column in Barron’s this weekend. Good luck finding one for yourself (I ain’t selling mine). 

Category: Commodities, Economy, Markets, Weblogs

Please use the comments to demonstrate your own ignorance, unfamiliarity with empirical data and lack of respect for scientific knowledge. Be sure to create straw men and argue against things I have neither said nor implied. If you could repeat previously discredited memes or steer the conversation into irrelevant, off topic discussions, it would be appreciated. Lastly, kindly forgo all civility in your discourse . . . you are, after all, anonymous.

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