Deal_ma_2

Source:
Romping Through the Biggest M&A Year in History
October 2, 2007, 4:24 pm
http://blogs.wsj.com/deals/2007/10/02/romping-through-the-biggest-ma-year-in-history/

M&A Graphic
http://online.wsj.com/public/resources/documents/info-THIRD_QUARTER_MA.html

Category: Corporate Management, M&A, Markets

Please use the comments to demonstrate your own ignorance, unfamiliarity with empirical data and lack of respect for scientific knowledge. Be sure to create straw men and argue against things I have neither said nor implied. If you could repeat previously discredited memes or steer the conversation into irrelevant, off topic discussions, it would be appreciated. Lastly, kindly forgo all civility in your discourse . . . you are, after all, anonymous.

10 Responses to “Biggest M&A Year in History”

  1. michael schumacher says:

    Too bad none of it matters……

    because if it did then we would’nt be sitting at all time highs.

    Biggest shell game in the world is our stock market. Last Friday’s job report proved one thing: that carefully massaged commerce department releases will get you exactly what you want….when you want it….nevermind that in reporting what it did, how it did you realize that the error in it’s own gathering and reporting is off by a factor of over 800%…..

    But that’s ok…just continue to have China buy the SPX while we circle jerk ourselves into economic oblivion.

    How this market has any credibility left is just unfathomable……

    Ciao
    MS

  2. shrek says:

    Everyone assumes the government is going to save them.

  3. michael schumacher says:

    Love how the WSJ is becoming more and more and obvious cheerleader to the market.

    Look at how they “interpret” the action in the Asia markets……

    This is exactly what we are going to get starting next week…..

    “Everything is just great”

    I am convinced that if someone were to set off a dirty bomb (or something akin to 9-11) the market would embrace it and we would still be at this level…..

    because it would be presented as a growth opp. like everything else.

    Ciao
    MS

  4. Das Gherkin says:

    Off topic, but it looks like Bloomberg has lost another anchor. This time Robert Gray who appears in a Fox Business News video I just watched. Bloomberg needs new producers and talent.

  5. oldman lincoln says:

    America:Israel Soviet is very much now an apartheid state. For the uber-class of Neo-Zi advocates, no rules apply than the jungle law of adverse possession, while for the unter class of J6P’s and non-citizens, the penalty for not paying a 28% tithe to State, 28% interest to Corporate, and 500% grift to gOilum, is disappearing into their gulag prison system, itself a profit engine for State:Corporate, while at the same time, the uber class simply “writes down” their debt, and “floats” more debt, files restated 8-K’s, dispenses $B’s in deferred payola, registers offshore tax-free, and yet calls for lower capital gains and more prisons.

    You couldn’t make this shtuff up….

  6. Adam says:

    Can someone explain to me how S&P 500 Q3 operating earnings are expected to rise, despite the facts that (a) financials comprise a substantial % of S&P 500 earnings and (b) financial companies’ profits tanked in Q3?

  7. Justin says:

    Adam, remember the old voodoo economics? Well now it is voodoo accounting! lol

  8. Connie says:

    Can someone tell me what M&A is?

  9. kckid816 says:

    Connie,

    Mergers and Acquistions

  10. m3 says:

    Sallie Mae Sues Buyers Over Deal

    http://tinyurl.com/2az9us

    Sallie Mae has filed a lawsuit against the group of firms that had agreed to buy the student lender but are now trying to renegotiate the deal.

    The suit, filed Monday night in Delaware chancery court, comes one day ahead of a self-imposed deadline by the buyers to reach a new agreement. Failing that, the buyers — private equity firms J.C. Flowers & Company and Friedman Fleischer & Lowe and banks JPMorgan Chase and Bank of America — were prepared to walk away and suffer the consequences. Under the terms of the deal, the firms would pay a $900 million breakup fee.