Media_analysis

>
I don’t know about you, but I find this stuff fascinating: The table below is from Center for Media Research on financial news destinations online for investors: A drill down into Online financial news and information sites in the 2nd week in October highlights top sites visited.

 

Top 10 Online Financial News & Information Destinations
(
Week ending October 14, 2007 US, Home and Work)

Brand or Channel

Unique Audience (000)

Active Reach (%)

Yahoo! Finance

7,379

5.42

MSN Money

7,168

5.27

AOL Money & Finance

5,361

3.94

Wall Street Journal Digital

4,236

3.11

CNNMoney

3,223

2.37

Reuters

2,453

1.8

Forbes.com

2,231

1.64

Motley Fool

1,282

0.94

TheStreet.com

1,205

0.89

FreeCreditReport.com

1,021

0.75

Source:    Nielsen Online, NetView

>

Source:
More Than Half of Online Financial News Readers Are Over 45
Jack Loechner,
Center for Media Research, Friday, Nov 16, 2007 8:15 AM ET
http://publications.mediapost.com/?fuseaction=Articles.showArticleHomePage&art_aid=70788

Category: Digital Media, Financial Press, Web/Tech

Please use the comments to demonstrate your own ignorance, unfamiliarity with empirical data and lack of respect for scientific knowledge. Be sure to create straw men and argue against things I have neither said nor implied. If you could repeat previously discredited memes or steer the conversation into irrelevant, off topic discussions, it would be appreciated. Lastly, kindly forgo all civility in your discourse . . . you are, after all, anonymous.

15 Responses to “Top 10 Online Financial News & Information Destinations”

  1. And some of this stuff isn’t very good. Bloomberg should be high on the list.

  2. internet-anon says:

    yahoo finance is one of the few things that YHOO hasn’t managed to screw up/lose superiority to GOOG.

    Like the mass quotes/historical quotes export-to-excel feature the best.

    Don’t screw this up too Jerry Yang!

  3. Frank_The_Tank says:

    Your daily dose of mis-information/propaganda…Served here daily.

  4. internet-anon says:

    the lack of bloomberg.com is no surprise….as bloomberg.com is the anti-USA today (unlike yahoo finance/others on the list).

    and reading most articles on bloomberg.com requires a prior understanding of financial concepts/actors/etc.

    besides, the average reader of bloomberg.com has a net worth well into the seven figures. even your “average” college graduate doesn’t know who/what bloomberg is.

    bloomberg LP doesn’t care if it reaches the masses….bloomberg.com is used as a fix for those who aren’t near a bloomberg terminal.

    I’m surprised reuters is so high up….probably gets a lot of click-thrus from its partner sites.

  5. muckdog says:

    1.37% is age 2-11? “Junior can’t walk and isn’t yet potty trained, but he sure seems to spend a lot of time on that Motley Fool site.”

    No respose was 2.2% (ie, busy downloading porn).

    Surprised not to see CBS Marketwatch in the Top Ten. And maybe TheStreet.

  6. SINGER says:

    I use Yahoo, Bloomberg,Stockcharts, and The Big Picture….

  7. C P says:

    CBS MarketWatch isn’t going to be in there because it’s not part of CBS – hasn’t been since 2005. Its numbers are probably included in the Wall Street Journal Digital category. But it does show you how poorly Dow Jones has marketed the thing.

  8. Philippe says:

    Strange outcome an other Gaussian curve with large fat tails.
    Bloomberg.com should be the first one on the list indeed! The information spectrum is large, well documented and independently minded.

  9. Marcus Aurelius says:

    Im surprised the Big Picture didn’t make the top five. The rankings have obviously been rigged by the good ol’ boy network.

  10. I love the fact they’ve listed freecreditreports.com there. Do you suppose most of clickers are flippers who’ve flopped?

  11. muckdog says:

    Obviously, The Big Picture’s hit count is understated due to hedonic adjustments.

    I previously stated that TheStreet should’ve made it, and I see it there at #9 on second glance. Thar she blows. My bad.

    And who goes to Reuters except from a Yahoo Finance link? It’s a second-hand link!

    My blog didn’t make it because (a) the liberal MSM is biased against conservatives and (b) lack of hits. Disappointing, especially with the Jessica Biel pic up today. I think that’d resonate with the coveted 18-24 male demographic. Or even the 14-94 male demographic. ;)

  12. pacified says:

    poor victimized muckdog! In his diluted mind the conservatives who run all the media outlets in this country are against him.

    Pathetic.

  13. Aaron says:

    I’m pretty surprised that MSN Money is as close as it is to Yahoo Finance. It seems to me that Yahoo Finance has the far superior site and research capabilities.

  14. m3 says:

    i was big on Y!, but have been using google more and more.

    google’s going to be an up-and-comer, imo.

  15. Phipps says:

    C P ‘s comments gave the best answer yet to my question and my reason for delving into the comments section in the first place. That is, to figure out why CBS Marketwatch was not represented on the list.

    At least within my place of work (medical clinic, not exactly thick with professional financial types), Marketwatch is the lunch break choice of us fiscal middlebrows. While it pales in comparison to Bloomberg, it does provide decent summaries of the current conventional wisdom for us lambs to the slaughter. And it’s consistently a cut above MSN Money (excepting the great Jim Jubak).

    Say, a question for you financial consultant folks: a pharmacy rep (swing a dead cat in any medical clinic these days) told me that the major brokerage houses train sales staff specifically to recruit physicians as new clients. I have yet to see this myself, but maybe it’s just the plastic surgeons, dermatologists and private practice Olympians that get all the love and not the denizens of inner city Public Health Clinics.

    Yours tangentially,

    Phipps

    PS> In light of the holiday, thanks to Barry and to many of the frequent commentators on these boards. Many of you have had “actionable intelligence” or at least an original, informed take on the markets. I (sincerely) get the feeling some of you are pros— but minus the stereotypical swollen egos, you’re harder to identify. I think Barry sets a great tone which attracts other sober-minded old pros.