via NYT

>

Source:
Sharp Trade Contraction Knows No Borders
FLOYD NORRIS
NYT, January 16, 2009

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/17/business/economy/17charts.html

Category: Digital Media, Economy, Markets

Please use the comments to demonstrate your own ignorance, unfamiliarity with empirical data and lack of respect for scientific knowledge. Be sure to create straw men and argue against things I have neither said nor implied. If you could repeat previously discredited memes or steer the conversation into irrelevant, off topic discussions, it would be appreciated. Lastly, kindly forgo all civility in your discourse . . . you are, after all, anonymous.

5 Responses to “Global Slowdown in Exports”

  1. Steve Barry says:

    While Yardeni was lauding the “global synchronized boom”, very few of us saw the “global synchronized bust”…but it is finally here.

  2. Moss says:

    Geez… the volatility is amazing as well. I thought the World was flat!

  3. Blackhalo says:

    Apparently publishing is affected as well…

    Unfortunately, the release date for the item(s) listed below has changed, and we need to provide you with a new delivery estimate based on the new release date:

    Barry Ritholtz (Author) “Bailout Nation: How Easy Money Corrupted
    Wall Street and Shook the World Economy” [Hardcover]
    Estimated arrival date: 03/31/2009 – 04/06/2009

  4. Mike in Nola says:

    Steve:

    I dunno about not seeing the global bust. Since the booms in India and China depended on selling us stuff and, in India’s case, outsourcing from the US, it seemed pretty obvious over a year ago that they would get hit when we did.

    Curious as to whether the chart of the value of US exports more or less mirrored the value of the dollar against foreign currencies, i.e. we didn’t really export a lot more, but the number of dollars it took to pay for it varied. The chart for the US roughly corresponds to the FXE. Until last quarter of 08. Of course, my reasoning may be way off.

  5. Steve Barry says:

    Mike:

    I’m talking about back in 2006… maybe less than 1% of the population would have been predicting a global bust.