Pretty cool application of Google Maps to the current outbreak:

US

us-swine

Europe

euro-swine

via Google

Category: Technology, Web/Tech

Please use the comments to demonstrate your own ignorance, unfamiliarity with empirical data and lack of respect for scientific knowledge. Be sure to create straw men and argue against things I have neither said nor implied. If you could repeat previously discredited memes or steer the conversation into irrelevant, off topic discussions, it would be appreciated. Lastly, kindly forgo all civility in your discourse . . . you are, after all, anonymous.

31 Responses to “H1N1 Swine Flu (Google Maps)”

  1. Bruce N Tennessee says:

    http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/3485a758-3351-11de-8f1b-00144feabdc0.html

    Mexico City faces threat of shutdown

    “Mexico City authorities on Monday admitted they might have to “shut down” Mexico’s sprawling capital in an effort to combat an outbreak of swine flu that has so far claimed the lives of up to 149 people, according to official reports. “

  2. Super-Anon says:

    I love how the decline today is due to the Swine Flu and is totally unrelated to the bankrupt US consumer.

  3. Mannwich says:

    But Cancun and Playa Del Carmen look OK! Wonder if my wife and I can get a resort to myself ourselves?

  4. leftback says:

    Not to minimize the health hazards associated with this outbreak which is obviously something to be taken very seriously, but can you imagine what would happen if this virus was a truly virulent strain with a high fatality rate? What we are seeing is an indication of how quickly a highly infectious virus can spread in the modern era of international travel. Now imagine the same maps with 1,000 x more deaths and that’s what would happen if something like a true “killer flu” virus gets loose.

  5. MRegan says:

    Like I said, they are watching the barium isotope move through the system.

    Interesting link on Mexico: http://mexfiles.net/

  6. market about to start chugging again higher.

  7. Mortimus says:

    This disease will be fatal to Senator Collins career if this thing gets out of control. My did she pick the wrong issue to harp over.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3_Ax3KVdp8

  8. Super-Anon says:

    Something stinks about this market today. Anyone sense that some bigger players are selling here?

  9. drtomaso says:

    I have seen all the movies on this subject. A few reminders:
    (1) when you wake up, and you think everyone in your city is just gone- don’t be fooled! Get to the nearest police station or military armory and arm up. Don’t forget body armor- other survivors may be just as dangerous as the infected.
    (2) stay away from dogs- the disease will make them really fast.

  10. franklin411 says:

    @Mortimus:
    Haha! Reminds me of Gov. Bobbie Jindal ridiculing volcano monitoring funds as an example of government waste in the Economic Recovery and Reinvestment Act, just days before a major volcanic eruption struck Gov. Sarah Palin’s state of Alaska!

  11. Super-Anon says:

    market about to start chugging again higher.

    What bugs me right now is that everything is red including commodities and some of the trashier stuff is getting pounded while the main indexes are holding up relatively well. We haven’t really seen that kind of behavior much recently…

  12. Mike in Nola says:

    BTW, when is World War Z coming out on film?

  13. DL says:

    Super-Anon @ 3:16

    Upside momentum is waning, to say the least.

  14. Super-Anon says:

    Super-Anon @ 3:16

    Upside momentum is waning, to say the least.

    Look at IYR ignoring the majors and still going straight to hell…

  15. Chubby Davis says:

    Market wishing it got that Flu Shot in November!

  16. DL says:

    Humble Mexican pig halts DOW advance.

  17. dps says:

    Just think, if all those newspapers (print media in general) that are struggling and complaining about search eating their lunch had invested or partnered with Google ( they could’ve been what AP is supposed to be) in the beginning, they’d be laughing all the way to the bank (or at least avoiding BK courts). And don’t complain about costs. When you see 200 reporters (or more) at a press conference where a live feed is available to the masses, you know serious money is being wasted. Lack of foresight well as terrible asset allocation is/was a major problem.

  18. Thatguy says:

    I wonder how much this has to do with the threatened Republican filibuster of the HHS nominee?!?!?!? I’ve been trying to noodle it all morning and then this jumped out at me while reading MRegan’s link. Thanks!

    I see shadows behind every corner nowadays. This new foil hat of mine is fitting rather comfortably.

  19. EAR says:

    Troubling if you compare it to 1918…

    “The 1918 flu pandemic (commonly referred to as the Spanish flu) was an influenza pandemic that spread to nearly every part of the world. It was caused by an unusually virulent and deadly Influenza A virus strain of subtype H1N1.”

    “Most of its victims were healthy young adults…”

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_flu

    Check out the “Notable survivors” list. No wonder the insiders are selling, the affluent seem to beat the influenza.

    But, THIS is the real kick in the face…

    “In the 1918–1919 pandemic, a first or spring wave began in March 1918 and spread unevenly through the United States, Europe, and possibly Asia over the next 6 months (Figure 1). Illness rates were high, but death rates in most locales were not appreciably above normal. A second or fall wave spread globally from September to November 1918 and was highly fatal. In many nations, a third wave occurred in early 1919 (21). Clinical similarities led contemporary observers to conclude initially that they were observing the same disease in the successive waves. The milder forms of illness in all 3 waves were identical and typical of influenza seen in the 1889 pandemic and in prior interpandemic years. In retrospect, even the rapid progressions from uncomplicated influenza infections to fatal pneumonia, a hallmark of the 1918–1919 fall and winter waves, had been noted in the relatively few severe spring wave cases. The differences between the waves thus seemed to be primarily in the much higher frequency of complicated, severe, and fatal cases in the last 2 waves.”

    http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/eid/vol12no01/05-0979.htm

    This could be a mere fire drill. What if a worse strain happens to pop up in a few months along with the universal realization that the world’s economy is not getting better?

    Perfect for the bears, just stay inside and short the world.

  20. MRegan says:

    If you look at the maps and think in terms of routes, you can tell that something was piggybacked on coke trade routes. Bilbao.

  21. EAR says:

    Sorry about that.

    I just got out of the empty tub, took off my tin foil hat, crumpled it up and threw it away.

  22. MRegan says:

    If this is merely a seasonal event, I would like one of you Randi the Magnificients out there to describe an analogous event from April of 2008.

  23. MRegan says:

    Didn’t think so.

  24. sinomania says:

    Remember SARS? At this point in that crisis it was full-on pandemic end of the world talk. By the time that settled down around 774 had died of SARS worldwide.

    But according to the CDC 36,000 die eachyear of FLU in the USA alone;

    and each day on planet Earth 15,000 people are infected with HIV;

    in 2008 there were 44 fatalities and 1,356 cases of WEST NILE VIRUS in the USA;

    and EVERY 30 SECONDS, the MALARIA Virus kills a child in Africa and accounts for 90‰ of child deaths below five years in Black Africa. …

    let’s keep it in perspective.

  25. mark mchugh says:

    …..seems contained………

  26. Dan Duncan says:

    The virulence of the Spanish Flu in 1918 was dramatically increased by the ravages of WWI. For some reason the commentators fail to mention this fact when invoking comparisons to that deadly outbreak. Close quarters of the soldiers, trench warfare and malnourishment made things much worse. It also helps to explain why so many younger adults died.

  27. moneyneversleepsblog says:

    @Dan Duncan – no point in making a good point like that, doesn’t sell enough papers or attract enough hits even if it is the truth!!

    sweet maps! From a market perspective, Mike Huckman said all you need to know about the Swine Scare on fast money.. http://moneyneversleepsblog.blogspot.com/2009/04/mike-huckman-breaks-down-swine-flu.html

    Basically the same info as SINOMANIA above.. hardly a market issue, of course it is a health issue for those areas, especially Mexico since there are deaths. Could set up some short term trading opportunities but the reaction was a little over the top based on the current info.

    Attack of the black swine…er swan…

  28. willid3 says:

    i wonder if this is a continuation of SARS. but then again it could be nothing more than the out growth the normal news dictate. if it bleeds it leads. after all these are business first right. it could be real, we won’t know for a while. the only economic issue is that Mexico is like our 3 largest trading partner, in front of Japan. and thats because they are a major source of…..oil. care to guess why we have been so accommodating to them for so long?

  29. FromLori says:

    This virus is mutating in ways never seen before and the WHO has just moved the Alert to a 4+ a 5 is considered a pandemic…

    For the Who alert..

    http://bluelori.blogspot.com/2009/04/who-has-raised-altert-to-4.html

    How it is mutating…

    http://bluelori.blogspot.com/2009/04/other-white-meat-illegal-alien-swine.html

    Costs…

    http://bluelori.blogspot.com/2009/04/how-much-will-swine-flu-pandemic-cost.html

  30. [...] The Big Picture. Monday, April 27th, 2009 Health, Technology, The [...]

  31. gunterik says:

    Has anyone been tracking the spread of swine flu on this website http://www.swine-flu-tracker.com/? It seems every time I check it the swine flu spreads