There are a variety of estimates as to the total spillage from the Deepwater Horizon disaster.

As of yesterday, they were all significantly losses worse than the 10.8 million gallons of crude the drunk captain of the Exxon Valdez spilled. The range is 23.2 million gallons by the US government, to the worst case scenario of BP itself at 92.5 million gallons.

And counting.

When this is done, it will dwarf the Valdez in total spillage, economic an d environmental damage.

>

Tracking the Oil Spill in the Gulf

click for interactive timeline

Graphic via the NYT

>

Source:
Size of Oil Spill Underestimated, Scientists Say
JUSTIN GILLIS
NYT, May 13, 2010
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/14/us/14oil.html

About the Oil Slick Areas Shown on the Map: The “probable extent” of the oil slick is an estimate by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration of where oil is mostly likely to go based on wind and ocean current forecasts, as well as analysis of aerial photography and satellite imagery. The “observed extent” show areas where oil was visible on the surface of the water during aerial surveys of the Gulf. The observed extents are not available every day. The extents may vary widely from day to day because of changes in wind patterns and ocean currents.

The loop currents are from NOAA and from Roffer’s Ocean Fishing Forecasting Service.

Category: Digital Media, Energy, Really, really bad calls

Please use the comments to demonstrate your own ignorance, unfamiliarity with empirical data and lack of respect for scientific knowledge. Be sure to create straw men and argue against things I have neither said nor implied. If you could repeat previously discredited memes or steer the conversation into irrelevant, off topic discussions, it would be appreciated. Lastly, kindly forgo all civility in your discourse . . . you are, after all, anonymous.

53 Responses to “BP Deepwater Spill = 4X Worse Than Exxon Valdez”

  1. dead hobo says:

    Remember how much oil prices used to go up with ill tempered residents of Nigeria used harsh language? Or when clouds that might contain rain billowed over the Gulf of Mexico during hurricane season? Ah, the good old days when everyone believed high oil prices were due to an immediately pending peak oil event. Or when the Wed report showed oil inventories went down a little, even though the amount in storage was still higher than any time in history? Anyone who claimed oil thieves were manipulating prices using long only funds and oceans of money was ridiculed? So, why isn’t oil above $100 now? I doubt the CFTC has noticed anything.

  2. The Houston Chronicle has nice Deepwater Disaster portal:

    http://www.chron.com/oilspill/

  3. jritzema says:

    In the worst case it would be the third largest ever:

    http://www.popularmechanics.com/science/energy/coal-oil-gas/biggest-oil-spills-in-history?src=rss

    ~~~

    BR: Worst in US history . . .

  4. tradeking13 says:

    Not to defend the captain of the Exxon Valdez, but actually he was below decks sleeping off his bender. It was the third mate piloting the ship with a busted radar that Exxon deemed to expensive to fix.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exxon_Valdez_oil_spill#Identified_causes

  5. franklin411 says:

    Rachel Maddow showed some old clips from the 1979 Ixtoc Oil Spill in the Gulf (3 million barrels). You know what I found interesting?

    Commentators at the time said that the spill would annihilate Gulf fisheries for a decade.

    Now, I don’t seem to recall a decade-long absence of seafood from the Gulf in the 80s.

    I don’t buy the bogeyman stories being circulated out there. If I had my druthers, this would never have happened. But I don’t buy the statement that this will lead to devastating economic and environmental loss.

    Frankly, I think the Gulf residents are milking this for every Federal and BP dollar they can suckle.

  6. rtalcott says:

    Anyone see the Bloomberg interview with Matt Simmons a few hours ago…he said that there is a huge leak elsewhere and the well area is a sideshow….I think the argument was that the large underwater plume data was not consistent with the flow from the well. he was guessing the plume data gives a 4,000,000 gallon/day rate…

    Anyone else see this?
    rt

  7. YouthInAsia says:

    “Now, I don’t seem to recall a decade-long absence of seafood from the Gulf in the 80s.”

    50 (or maybe even 100?) Million >> 3 million

    Still, I suppose the gulf could be large enough to dilute this on a reasonable time frame.

  8. Owen Money says:

    Consider the possibility than nothing can stop this gusher. Yep, when the came up with the golf balls idea, I figured they had no clue as to how to contain this thing:

    “The workers had hoped to place a large dome over the ruptured well but had to move it to the side after a build-up of crystallized gas inside it.

    Now BP may have to resort to blocking the ruptured well by what it described as ‘stopping up a toilet’.

    Thad Allen, US Coast Board Admiral, told CBS News: “They are actually going to take a bunch of debris — some shredded up tires, golf balls and things like that — and under very high pressure shoot it into the preventer itself and see if they can clog it up to stop the leak.”

  9. jritzema says:

    @youthinasia – watch you conversions. 3 million barrells is 126 million gallons.

    1 barrel is 42 gallons

  10. Greg0658 says:

    ya beat me f411:

    The Rachel Maddow Show “That Was Then This Is Then” episode
    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26315908/#37368377
    ps – that white guy was Floyd Kalber
    http://www.floydkalber.com/images/floyd-back-dvd.jpg

    Ixtoc Oilwell BOP Blowout June 3, 1979 – “In the next nine months, experts and divers including Red Adair were brought in to contain and cap the oil well. An average of approximately ten thousand to thirty thousand barrels per day were discharged into the Gulf until it was finally capped on 23 March 1980.”
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ixtoc_I_oil_spill
    9m x 30d x 10K = 2.7M barrels x 3 = 8.1M

    “The Jimmy Carter administration began a phased deregulation of oil prices on April 5, 1979, when the average price of crude oil was US$15.85 per barrel (42 US gallons).”
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1979_energy_crisis

    a good capitalorist agrees “never let a serious crisis go to waste” – Rahm Emanuel

  11. rob says:

    Franklin411: As a resident of the “Emerald Coast” Panama City FL where about 75% of our local economy revenue comes from assholes like YOU that come here to play! Just shut the fuck up if you can’t contribute anything other than your usual bowel manifestations from inside your skull. For the other people FYI – we’re taking the boat out this weekend about 60 miles out to the slick just to see it. If it hits our shores, so much for the green water and white barking sand!

  12. Deflator Mouse says:

    Comparing Ixtoc Oilwell blowout to the Deepwater Horizon is not a simple matter of oil volume, but depends where that oil goes. Recall that bad weather stymied efforts to contain the flow initially, and unfortunate prevailing winds blew this goo into sensitive Louisianna wetlands, migratory bird rookeries, and shrimp/oyster beds. All this is happening in the spring, when young animals are very vulnerable. Sometimes size (alone) doesn’t mater.

    The economic fallout from this will be staggering.

  13. YouthInAsia says:

    jritzema – oops, I wasn’t paying attention.

  14. PeterR says:

    The New Dead Sea?

    I don’t think the equity markets have fully appreciated the possibility that this leak may be impossible to stop (see Owen Money comment above).

    The temperature and pressure of the oil field at this depth could cause the leak to ooze indefinitely, which in turn could make the entire Gulf into The New Dead Sea. The economic costs would be hard to calculate.

    Further transmission to the Atlantic Ocean could ruin South America’s northern coastline, and creep up the US East Coast. If this shit gets into the Gulf Stream, it could be in Ireland etc. in a month or two.

    If (when?) the world equity markets wake up to this possibility, the crash in 1929 could look like a pimple.

  15. RadioFlyer says:

    Nuke it.

  16. Greg0658 says:

    rob and other boaters (me included) you LA fishermen .. if your not sailing with cloth sails – the rhetoric is a bit – well .. Obamas Katrina (please) .. we are all stuck on this planet together .. we need that oil – or we need something else – or we need less people needing oil .. blame the markets structure – imo its the hitting numbers for number pushers

  17. me says:

    Owen Money beat me too it. The top kill failed when they quit pumping. They are clueless.

    But I agree with republicans, limit their liablity to a year of profit, which after they write off the loss for the platform will be zero.

  18. Marcus Aurelius says:

    We don’t need anything enough to poison the environment. I guess at some people’s houses, if there’s lots of guests, and a line for the bathroom, they just shit in the kitchen sink.

  19. The Curmudgeon says:

    “I don’t buy the bogeyman stories being circulated out there. If I had my druthers, this would never have happened. But I don’t buy the statement that this will lead to devastating economic and environmental loss.

    Frankly, I think the Gulf residents are milking this for every Federal and BP dollar they can suckle.”

    ~Indeed, exactly my thoughts. Mother Nature is far more resilient than we give her credit for. We still are just puny little scabs on her backside. But it’s always nice when you can play it for some ‘mo’ of Uncle Sugar’s sweetener.

    Note to F411: That makes twice that I’ve agreed w/ your posts today. Where is Franklin411 and what have you done w/ his body?

  20. VennData says:

    Why hasn’t Obama developed the technology to fix this? He’s a TECHNOcrat, isn’t he? {applause}

    I agree with Karl Rove, it’s Obama’s Karina. {applause}

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704717004575268752362770856.html

    …in fact, it’s Obama’s “SEC Commissioner Chris Cox…” {oohs and ahs… applause}

    http://www.nysun.com/business/ex-sec-official-blames-agency-for-blow-up/86130/

    …financial blow up, blow out preventer, it’s all the same thing. {applause}

    Is this the hopey changey you wanted? {shouts of no… and applause}

    All the media can do is blame me, ME. I was governor of Alaska, that’s like a million miles from the Gulf Of Mexico. Which by the way, will be called the Gulf of America if the voters stop wantin’ people from inside the mainstream to lead us out of the 21st century. {applause}

    – Sarah Palin

  21. The Curmudgeon says:

    Oh, and Rob, you shut the fuck up. We already pay over and again for Gulf Coast stupidity in building condo’s and hotels on sand along the beach of an area that regularly, as guaranteed to happen as rain, gets hit by repeated hurricanes. Mother Nature could have as easily caused this spill as BP did. Either way, I’m sure we’ll have to pay if your precious sand gets a bit oily.

  22. huxrules says:

    6 months of no deep sea drilling. Thats not going to hurt…. I can’t even wrap my head around it.

  23. craig k says:

    why is it that when oil spills are discussed, they are measured in gallons? oil is measured by a barrel everywhere else?

  24. Clay says:

    Following are links to some objective research on “Natural Oil Seeps vs. Oil Spills” and “Anatomy of an Oil Plume” by Jamie Friedland for those interested:

    The first piece examines a few statements by Rush Limbaugh of which some are true, then Friedland expands his discussion to include his research on natural oil seeps vs. oil spills:

    http://politicalclimate.wordpress.com/2010/05/26/natural-oil-seeps-vs-oil-spills/

    Anatomy of an oil plume:
    http://politicalclimate.wordpress.com/2010/05/24/anatomy-of-an-oil-plume/

    Jamie Friedland is a 2009 Duke Univ. graduate with a major in Public Policy Studies and a minor in Environmental Science and Policy.

    I happened upon his site pursuant to searching for info on oil plumes.

  25. Thor says:

    Craig – I don’t know but it’s especially confusing when they go back and forth between gallons and barrels.

    Curmudgeon – you sound like the kind of person who throws trash out their car windows and dumps garbage in an empty field. You should be old enough to remember burning rivers, brown skies, and shit smelling beaches. Tell us, which oil company do you work for?

  26. msavage says:

    Article from Las Vegas Review Journal:
    http://www.lvrj.com/news/exxon-valdez-oil-risks-spur-warning-for-gulf-cleanup-crews-93258964.html

    More on the Subject:
    The workers who are cleaning up the oil in the Gulf need to be aware of the chemicals that will be used. I am one of the 11,000+ cleanup workers from the Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS) , who is suffering from health issues from that toxic cleanup, without compensation from Exxon.

    My name is Merle Savage; a female general foreman during the Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS) beach cleanup in 1989, which turned into 21 years of extensive health deterioration for me, and many other workers. Dr. Riki Ott visited me in 2007 to explain about the toxic spraying on the beaches. She also informed me that Exxon’s medical records and the reports that surfaced in litigation by sick workers in 1994, had been sealed from the public, making it impossible to hold Exxon responsible for their actions.
    http://www.rikiott.com

    Dr. Riki Ott has devoted her life to taking control from corporations and giving it back to We The People. If corporations continue to control our legal system, then We The People become victims. http://www.MovetoAmend.org

    Dr. Riki Ott has written two books; Sound Truth & Corporate Myth$ and Not One Drop. Dr. Ott has investigated and studied the oil spill spraying, and quotes numerous reports in her books, on the toxic chemicals that were used during the 1989 Prince William Sound oily beach cleanup. Black Wave the Film is based on Not One Drop, with interviews of cleanup victims; my interview was featured in the section; Like a War Zone.
    http://www.blackwavethefilm.com

    Exxon developed the toxic spraying; OSHA, the Coast Guard, and the state of Alaska authorized the procedure; VECO and other Exxon contractors implemented it. Beach crews breathed in crude oil that splashed off the rocks and into the air — the toxic exposure turned into chronic breathing conditions and central nervous system problems, along with other massive health issues. Some of the illnesses include neurological impairment, chronic respiratory disease, leukemia, lymphoma, brain tumors, liver damage, and blood disease.
    http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=5632208859935499100

    My web site is devoted to searching for EVOS cleanup workers who were exposed to the toxic spraying, and are suffering from the same illnesses that I have. Our summer employment turned into a death sentence for many — and a life of unending medical conditions for the rest of us – Exxon’s Collateral Damaged.
    http://www.silenceinthesound.com/stories.shtml
    http://www.silenceinthesound.com/gallery.shtml
    http://www.themarknews.com/articles/1593-the-risks-of-cleaning-up-after-bp

  27. Clay says:

    A standard barrel of crude oil contains 42 U. S. gallons.

    http://www.quoteoil.com/oil-barrel.html

  28. The Curmudgeon says:

    Thor, did I say that BP shouldn’t pay to clean this up? Of course they should. But I’m w/ F411 on this one. This is not likely to be as big a disaster environmentally or ecologically as all the fear mongers would like us to believe. Mother Nature is far tougher and more resilient than we give her credit for. And for the record, in answer to your ad hominen attack, no, I don’t litter or dump illegally, or work for an oil company.

    It is the mark of a small mind to answer an argument with an ad hominen attack, particularly in a forum such as this, when neither you nor I even know who the fuck we’re talking to. Attempting condescension along with an ad homine attack neatly reveals the ineptitude. Intellectual condescension is for people that feel intellectually inferior. Trust your feelings.

  29. I was going to be the first to go on the record and put my faith in nature to clean up our mess but you guys beat me to it. What will probably happen in a decade is we’ll have scientists ‘shocked’ at how well the region recovered and new species adapted to the problem.

    The circulating currents probably happen just for such a reason. To disperse large concentrations of toxins. So even though it may make a disastrous mess on the short term, the weather and elements will break it down over the longer term.

    If you want a good example of what was expected and what really happened then look at Mt. St. Helens. Scientists wrote the area off as a dead zone for years and were shocked at how fast the area recovered as well as how it recovered

  30. willid3 says:

    Tc I think we can say that we pay over and over for many places. not just the gulf coast. there are those who live along rivers (Mississippi any one?) or near lakes? can you say flood? and then there are those who live where the winds can get rather strong (aka Tornado). and then there are the places that have hail. one of the largest single causes of for nature related insurance claims in the country. and those are the ones that happen every year. and in the end cost lots more than the occasional hurricane. or earth quake

  31. The Curmudgeon says:

    @HTCM:

    Indeed. The circulating currents happen for a reason. Mother Nature/God/Buddha whomever you’d like to give the credit, made a pretty amazingly resilient planet for us to live on. Maybe the fact that oil and water don’t mix is all part of the plan.

  32. The Curmudgeon says:

    willid3, yeah, but, the Gulf Coast is an especially stupid place to build. It is guaranteed that whatever is built there will one day be destroyed by a hurricane. The Mississippi is another hard one, but much has been done to alleviate or prevent the damages caused by its naturally occurring and predictable floods. Whole towns have been moved to higher ground. Yet when the hurricanes pound the beach front condos and homes of millionaires along the Gulf, they howl that we should pay for them to rebuild, and protest if we say maybe it’s not such a good idea.

    I’ve got no problem with the foolishness of building along a coastline regularly wracked by hurricanes. So long as the fools, and not the taxpayers, suffer the losses for their foolishness.

  33. willid3 says:

    while i suspect it will recover. maybe not as quick as some would like to think. there are to many variables to even try to figure that out. i seem recall reading an article that was examining just how resistant mother earth was. they came to the conclusion that short of being able to crack the earth’s crust (with nukes maybe) the chances of humans hurting the planet long term were nil. but just because we can’t really hurt mother earth doesn’t mean that humans can survive any particular thing we do to it. after all mother earth’s time scale is sort of different than ours. being around a few billion years will do that to you. we haven’t that time scale.
    and what will likely happen to the gulf coast area where the spill happened is what happened to the Texas coast. nobody goes there to see the beaches any more like they used to. some thing about not wanting to be on an oily or trashy beach. we don’t have much of a tourist zone down there any more. and don’t know but i suspect the fishing business down there isn’t the same either

  34. hue says:

    sir, how do you like your fish today, regular or unleaded? (via a comment at zerohedge)

    TC, the fish population in the gulf is an aging population, can’t out grow the oil problem or retire at 50.

  35. The Curmudgeon says:

    Cute, hue. Good to see you’ve been listening.

  36. alfred e says:

    My sense is the BP folks have a heck of a tiger by the tail. And are relatively clueless for a quick fix. It will go on for months. Wish I were wrong. And hope I am wrong.

    It reminds me of the old insurance industry and safety focus on “incidents” and how quickly a seemingly unimportant incident can escalate into a major loss. And once the chain starts it only takes a few subsequent unfortunate conditions for all to be lost.

    BP obviously was in uncharted territory for them. And the “CEO “where’s my bonus” took over”.

    There used to be a term or two. Penny wise and pound foolish. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

    Seems to me enough oil has already been lost to more than pay for a little slower and more cautious well completion.

    As it plays out it’s my guess a lot more arrogance will come out than caution.

  37. TakBak04 says:

    dead hobo Says:
    May 28th, 2010 at 1:23 pm

    Remember how much oil prices used to go up with ill tempered residents of Nigeria used harsh language? Or when clouds that might contain rain billowed over the Gulf of Mexico during hurricane season? Ah, the good old days when everyone believed high oil prices were due to an immediately pending peak oil event. Or when the Wed report showed oil inventories went down a little, even though the amount in storage was still higher than any time in history? Anyone who claimed oil thieves were manipulating prices using long only funds and oceans of money was ridiculed? So, why isn’t oil above $100 now? I doubt the CFTC has noticed anything.

    ———

    I’ve found that Curious, also.

    We have HUGE OIL GUSHER in the Gulf of US…BP is going to be hit with Mega Law suits…yet with all the LOST OIL and Law Suits from that GUSER…OIL GOES DOWN? How can that be in a normal world where “cause and effect” and basic fundamentals of “Supply and Demand” used to Rule the Markets?

    It has to be some kind of intervention. And, that the prices of Gasoline went up when our Economy was on the rocks a couple of years ago when the financial situation really Hit the Skids.

    But…now…Oil is down with the worst disaster we’ve had in the US when this is the drilling that so many were depending on?

    Just too much that seems like obfuscation going on there…….

  38. TakBak04 says:

    The Curmudgeon Says:
    May 28th, 2010 at 6:14 pm

    willid3, yeah, but, the Gulf Coast is an especially stupid place to build. It is guaranteed that whatever is built there will one day be destroyed by a hurricane. The Mississippi is another hard one, but much has been done to alleviate or prevent the damages caused by its naturally occurring and predictable floods. Whole towns have been moved to higher ground. Yet when the hurricanes pound the beach front condos and homes of millionaires along the Gulf, they howl that we should pay for them to rebuild, and protest if we say maybe it’s not such a good idea.

    I’ve got no problem with the foolishness of building along a coastline regularly wracked by hurricanes. So long as the fools, and not the taxpayers, suffer the losses for their foolishness.

    ————

    People have been building in “Stupid” or “Vulnerable” places for CENTURIES.

    Did you ever think that such places are near COMMERCE and FREE CAPITALISM where they can Ship Goods and do Trade?

    So…don’t build near Rivers and Oceans and see what happens to Capitalism.

    Of course, you probably don’t see WHY folks like that should be compensated. Even though we just bailed out the Criminal Banking Enterprise who brought us down Globally to where we are right now.

    Let’s just blame those folks who have to live near the COMMERCE that supports their TRADE and their Lifestyle……and keeps Countries going Economically.

    Where the hell do YOU LIVE…. How save is it?

  39. Thor says:

    Curmudgeon – You’re calling me out for ad hominem attacks? Go back and read the history of your posts, there are literally thousands of your little gems of wisdom. You’re a piece of work man, keep up the good work.

  40. But…now…Oil is down with the worst disaster we’ve had in the US when this is the drilling that so many were depending on?

    Someone on these boards noted that oil prices just happen to follow the frequency of US elections. When an election is coming up the price trends down. After the election the price once again rises. I have been anecdotally watching it since I read that and it seems to be true. It also would not be surprising

  41. Thor says:

    I think the biggest issue with this spill will be the plumes. These are a new phenomena, are very large, and their numbers are unknown. Apparently some go from just below the surface to thousands of feet down, for all we know there could be dozens of floating dead zones all throughout the gulf. What would happen if some of these get caught up in the loop current? What if they already are? What is going to happen in hurricane season? Will the oil be degraded enough not to be much of a concern? Or will the deep plumes be blown up on shore?

    For those of the “oh, the planet will be fine” persuasion; I’m not sure what you are suggesting we should do here and in the future? Yes, of course the Earth will be fine, and in the end, the Sun will expand and swallow the Earth anyhow so what does any of it matter? What does the resiliency of the planet have to do with what kind of a world we would like to live in and leave to our descendants? The knowledge that the Earth will go on without us does not negate my desire to live in a world with clean beaches, air that we can breathe, and food that is not contaminated. What’s wrong with trying to protect the planet because we’d like to live in a clean world?

  42. GerhardWMagnus says:

    tradeking13 Says:

    Not to defend the captain of the Exxon Valdez, but actually he was below decks sleeping off his bender. It was the third mate piloting the ship with a busted radar that Exxon deemed to expensive to fix.

    Capt. Joseph Hazelwood always insisted that he was not sleeping it off, but catching up with his paperwork.

  43. d4winds says:

    My bet is that the spill will be far larger & the economic damage far greater than any of the “fear-mongers” ever imagined, but also that the facts on same will trickle out over the next decade & receive little to no coverage. BP will have a “tiny” mess to clean-up, one whose cost sounds high compared to typical monthly paychecks but which is barely a dent in a month’s free cash flow for BP. The environmental damage has no value (courtesy of we the people) and the threat to an entire way of life, as Gov. Jindal described it, has a total value of $75m (courtesy of we the people). BP chose to self-insure these minuscule sums and its borderline (actual?) negligence was ratified up & down the line by the MMS representatives in the non-performance their non-duties as duly prescribed (proscribed?) by the prior president & echoed very recently, but pre-Deepwater-Horizon, by the current president from another party. Judging from the facts, this disaster is something we knew would happen, allowed to happen, calculated was not worth the requisite pittance to avoid (since the potential liabilities were so incredibly small) & had full bipartisan executive & legislative support over decades. The liability limits themselves were upfront lemon socialism–a TBTF guarantee to Big Oil–from We the People. We decided–yes, an evil lobbyist may have written the language; big deal–that bankrupting a company in full pursuit of the eminently socially desirable goal of getting oil for our gas tanks was Not Appropriate; in the grand scheme of things, petroleum was more important than cod liver oil & that market prices do not–or should not–fully reflect that relative importance.

  44. Greg0658 says:

    Rachel Maddow Show last night at 4min see a graphic of the plumes (massive) but if I understood the facts they are mostly invisible to the naked eye because of the oil/saltwater mix – they are displayed with software from instrumentation Hubble Telescope type cameras
    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26315908#37408543

    Clay I checked out your link to Jamie Friedland. Bio he works in the POTUS WH now – a hire from working the streets during ’08. I don’t have a problem with that. Thats half of this capital -ism social system we have – you scrtach my back I scratch yours – thats the kind side of the animal kingdom too.

    scenario movie plot scripts:
    Greenies sabotaged the pipe to push for renewables
    NIMBY sabotaged the pipe to stop USA offshore work
    OIL Industrialist Z sabotaged the pipe to get work
    OPEC sabotaged the pipe to continue to lead the world in production
    MIC sabotaged the pipe to create cash flow in a world needing DisCap cash flows
    Financial Industry sabotaged the pipe to create cash flow to save the system & deflect interest in pigs at the trough
    ____ sabotaged the pipe to _____

  45. Greg0658 says:

    ps – what I want to believe – so my mind pretty much believes it – trust but verify sorta way = BP was working to hit numbers and deadlines with a “dazed and confused for so long its not true” reality new reality arrogance

  46. James says:

    Your post is a little dated, Barry. On the 27th the results of more thorough studies were released. See:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/28/us/28flow.html?hp

    and

    http://www.2theadvocate.com/news/95030444.html

  47. Clay says:

    I found this link at zerohedge today regarding info that the “real” leak could actually be at the well head.
    There’s a short article and two videos here…….one interview done by Bloomberg and the other by Dylan Ratigan. Very interesting.

    http://theintelhub.com/2010/05/28/simmons-calls-for-obama-to-take-over-bp-military-to-nuke-oil-leak/

    And Greg0658: I posted the Friedland link as his research appeared to be very scientific and objective. If the work appears to be scientific/objective and reasonably thorough then great, I don’t care what party affiliation one has. I don’t see anything in Friedland’s Bio about where he is currently working. According to his Bio, he did two internships with the Obama admin and following this he spent time working in environmental communications, but does not say where he is working now, if at all.

  48. Greg0658 says:

    uumm .. we’re both 1/2 right on Friedland ie bio – “During the summer of 2007, I interned at the Obama for America campaign headquarters in Chicago, where I also began my extended involvement with Students for Barack Obama. When I graduated, I moved to DC for a second political internship, this time within the administration. Getting paid for your work is so cliché. Upon the conclusion of that wonderful program, I spent some time working in environmental communications.” .. highlight’g “this time within the administration.” .. I did the telephone game from memory .. good thing I don’t do this with lawyers and bosses looking over my shoulder … and I thought the stuff was 1st rate / not junk and gave him (you) a plug for it

  49. alfred e says:

    Washington Post just announced the “top kill” failed.

    Next step cut the riser at the BOP, add a cap valve. Four days or more.

    Lots of luck with that one too.

    Maybe next time, if there is one, they’ll be more careful to ensure the BOP is healthy.

  50. VennData says:

    Peggy Noonan of the WSJ opinon page demands that Obama have an advanced degree in deep sea drilling…

    http://online.wsj.com/article/declarations.html

    … Peg, that sort of qualification will really limit the presidential field in ’12. And I like how she disparages our Commander-in-Chief because “…[he] took refuge in factual minutiae…”

    Unfortunately, Peg, that’s what it takes to do physics under the ocean. Facts. Where’s Peg’s physics? Where are her facts?

    And why, in an entire article she can’t bring herself to remember her ” Drill, baby Drill” castigations, where she never had “a plan” that she wants Obama to have had to fix a deep sea mess. Where was her “plan” in all of her flowery speachery?

    No where.

    And why does the WSJ give this bimbo a forum?

  51. VennData says:

    “…I understood the basic arguments: that deregulation held the promise of lower energy costs for consumers, cleaner and more efficient energy, profit for private sector investors in those companies that would compete to provide energy…”

    -Peggy Noonan.

    http://www.opinionjournal.com/columnists/pnoonan/?id=95001773

    Just deregulation, right? that’ll do it? Where is a government “plan” in all your deregulation Peg? we don’t need the gov’t to do anything but deregulate, right?

    Bimbo.

  52. VennData says:

    What do you want? Plans? You want gov’t plans? …or you want deregulation and less gov’t?

    You can’t have both.

    …of course you cant write like you want both. But that’s just silly. Like a silly bimbo .