These are some of the more interesting charts that I’ve seen since Friday’s NFP (if you have any suggestions, make them here and I’ll add the best of the lot):

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Comparing Recoveries


Courtesy NYT

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Monthly Payroll Since NBER REcession End


courtesy Invictus

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Temporary Help

via Bruce Steinberg

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Employment Data

Via NYT

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Percentage Job Losses, past Recessions

Via Calculated Risk

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Percentage Change From Recession End


via Chart of the Day

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Unemployment Duration (Months)

Via Economix

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Historical (interactive) Chart

via WSJ

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M’s suggestion:

via Calculated Risk

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Total Private Payrolls

via The Chart Store
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U6 Unemployment Rate

via The Chart Store

Category: Digital Media, Employment

Please use the comments to demonstrate your own ignorance, unfamiliarity with empirical data and lack of respect for scientific knowledge. Be sure to create straw men and argue against things I have neither said nor implied. If you could repeat previously discredited memes or steer the conversation into irrelevant, off topic discussions, it would be appreciated. Lastly, kindly forgo all civility in your discourse . . . you are, after all, anonymous.

12 Responses to “Employment Chart RoundUp”

  1. guy.yedwab says:

    Question: why is the recovery in 1980 split out from the recovery from 1981-1983? 1980 seems the shortest, but it seems to me rather relevant that it almost immediately returned to contraction before a more medium-term recovery. Is there an economic reason, or does it simply have to do with when it returned to peak?

  2. guy.yedwab says:

    Question: why is the recovery in 1980 split out from the recovery from 1981-1983? 1980 seems the shortest, but it seems to me rather relevant that it almost immediately returned to contraction before a more medium-term recovery. Is there an economic reason, or does it simply have to do with when it returned to peak?

  3. I just read this line. It’s OT but probably the single best line I’ve ever read:

    “It doesn’t matter who you vote for – the government always gets in”

  4. M says:

    CR has a better (IMHO) version of the NYT chart and other interesting employment chart porn here: http://cr4re.com/charts/charts.html#category=Employment&chart=EmploymentRecessionsNov.jpg

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    BR: Done!

  5. constantnormal says:

    The excruciatingly slow recovery of employment (not yet ahead of the rate at which the potential labor force is growing) portends no return to the levels of employment prior to this “recession” until sometime around 2015.

    The odds of encountering another recession before we get there seem quite high.

    Is this the Japanese stairway to irrelevance? They too, suffered a series of recessions with the recoveries so weak as to not being fully recovered before the next one hit, taking them another step down the stairs.

    One would think that eventually the Bananamerican sheeple would reach the limits of what they will put up with.

  6. dsimmons says:

    Info porn, oh BR, gimme more charts baby.

    I personally like the Calculated Risk one the best for it’

  7. beaufou says:

    This is supposed to be a jobless recovery, remember.
    Why on earth would anyone expect employment numbers to get better, after all this is about corporate profits and lobby moneys isn’t it?
    Now, if we could offer a few more tax breaks to millionaires and corporations so they can non-create jobs, we’re set.

  8. bonderman says:

    It is starting to look like adding the 1929-19

  9. bonderman says:

    How about adding the 1929-1940 period onto the Company Recovery chart for comparison?

  10. Long term says:

    Observations:

    * Calculated Risk measures troughs much better than NBER
    * CR could do better by putting the year ON the lines
    * hindsight is 20/20
    * Corp America does not need a bunch of the folks currently unemployed to make nice profits
    * maybe slower climbs from trough could be correlated strongly with balance sheet recessions
    * maybe paying off the losses is more important that putting people to work at current
    * Will adding jobs put a drag on profits?

    My answer to the last is Yes if it is done artificially. For instance if it is done by taking interest rates to 0 and printing 600B. That would be fake demand that puts people to fake work. You may kiss a blow up doll but she will not kiss back.

  11. Investradamus says:

    CR has a new derivation of that chart as well, where it aligns everything at the tough (maximum job losses).

    http://cr4re.com/charts/charts.html#category=Employment&chart=EmploymentRecessionsAlignedNov.jpg

  12. Meteor Blades1 says:

    Good charts. But that final one is U3, not U6.