Another good interactive graphic from the WSJ:

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click for interactive graphic

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If you cannot access this directly, go to the article “A Long, Painful Reckoning” and click on the interactive feature marked “Inside the Reactors.”  (Clicking on the Interactive Tab won’t get you there).

Category: Digital Media, Energy

Please use the comments to demonstrate your own ignorance, unfamiliarity with empirical data and lack of respect for scientific knowledge. Be sure to create straw men and argue against things I have neither said nor implied. If you could repeat previously discredited memes or steer the conversation into irrelevant, off topic discussions, it would be appreciated. Lastly, kindly forgo all civility in your discourse . . . you are, after all, anonymous.

20 Responses to “Current Status at Fukushima Daiichi”

  1. Transor Z says:

    Police failed to spray water to cool No.3 reactor

    Japanese police have failed in their attempt to use water canon to cool the No.3 reactor at the quake-damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

    The high-pressure water did not reach the reactor and the police squad has now evacuated to a safety zone.

    The operation on Thursday evening followed efforts by the Self-Defense Forces using helicopters earlier in the day.

    Thursday, March 17, 2011 20:06 +0900 (JST)

    http://www3.nhk.or.jp/daily/english/17_34.html

  2. Petey Wheatstraw says:

    This disaster, coupled with the BP event in the GoM earlier this year and as is further demonstrated by our “Banking Industry’s” handling of the economic melt down — all of which were allowed to be managed by the corporations that screwed things up in the first place — clearly shows that a self regulated, corporatist-run, privatized, pseudo government is not up to the task of serving, much less protecting, the citizenry. The only goal of these feckless and dangerous incompetents is profit — regardless of any cost to society. For every life lost in this disaster, there is more than likely a corner that’s been cut in the name of cost reduction/profit maximization. The executive management team of TEPCO should be the ones hauling the hoses (when they finally have their shit together) to the containment pools.

    Talk about moral hazard. Jeez.

    http://www.tepco.co.jp/en/corpinfo/overview/message-e.html

  3. Petey Wheatstraw says:

    “For every life lost in this disaster, there is more than likely a corner that’s been cut in the name of cost reduction/profit maximization.”
    ___________

    To be clear, I’m referring to the nuclear portion of the larger disaster.

  4. Petey Wheatstraw says:

    Sound track:

    It would seem that Japanese popular culture, in light of their WWII experiences and rapid industrialization, would have done better at risk mitigation. A cultural mishmash (Japanese cine overlaid with an American twist), is here:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o7gFlSGXt_k

    Sadly prophetic.

  5. ZackAttack says:

    The half-measures TEPCO is taking here are simply astonishing.

    I agree with the poster above… this display of ineptitude is a microcosm of privatization.

  6. Lugnut says:

    I’m no huge defender of big business, but I have to take a slightly contrarian view here. The reactor was 41 years old, survived a 9.0 quake, and survived the resulting tsunami with the containment vessel intact. Thats pretty frikkin remarkable when you think about it. We’re only in this mess because the diesel generators weren’t elevated; simple retro fix on any other exsiting shore bound reactor similarly constructed.

    That said, Godspeed to all the workers putting themselves into the breach. If you’ve ever watched the documentary ‘The Battle of Chernobyl’ you’ll know whats potentially in store in the months to come. Its not pretty.

  7. Jim67545 says:

    In retrospect (where everything is 20/20) it is amazing that they (or many other nuclear installations) would put multiple reactors in the same vicinity. I understand NIMBY. But the apparent hubris in assuming that whatever happens to #3 will be sufficiently controlable that normal operations and control can be continued at #1, #2 and #4 is puzzling, to say the least. Seems as though their “what if” or worse case scenarios were naive.

  8. Petey Wheatstraw says:

    Lugnut:

    “We’re only in this mess because the diesel generators weren’t elevated; simple retro fix on any other exsiting shore bound reactor similarly constructed.”
    ___________

    No one in management ever thought of elevating the generators? Japan, being in the ring of fire, didn’t foresee a 9.0 earthquake? Is a 9.0 even the worst-case scenario considering the location of the reactors?

    You can retro fix anything, except the area permanently poisoned by deadly radiation. The longer this goes on, the more likely the worst case scenario is. There are no do-overs.

    The ‘workers’ should be sent into the breach only after all of the executives have, in light of their culpability and as a shining example of corporate responsibility and leadership (and maybe even Bushido), demonstrated their own willingness to die for their fellow human beings. At their pay grade (and in light of their malfeasance), they are the right men for the job.

  9. Taliesyn says:

    Can’t improve upon the expressed opinions of Citizen Wheatstraw. Can;t help flashing back upon the mental images of what were to become *doomed* Chernobyl* plant workers wearing makeshift lead armor each carrying a shovelful of sand to dump on the reactor fire only to run away as fast as possible to limit exposure ( most died of cancer soon thereafter as documented on several news programs , but most striking was the *Frontline* report on the re-entering of that collapsed chamber with video cameras. It was like a scene out of “Alien”.Bottomline: the discovered that the core had indeed melted away into a glassified blob ).
    We’re still in this disaster triggered by a natural disaster as common in that region as Katrina-class Typhoons. Thus the damage is done insofar as to the power supply infrastructure ( word was that the failure of Chernobyl contributed to the economic collapse of Soviet economy because Chernobyl supplied power to the equivalent of a Soviet Detroit( read manufacturing complex). Lest we forget the costs of clean-up let alone resupplying lost power to that region’s grid. The number of people now out of work because of manufacturing shut-downs. Physical infrastructure to be rebuilt.
    And that’s all for just *One* earthquake. Anybody wanna speculate on what one such Earthquake would do to a nuke plant perched on any of the fault-lines in California and how many dollars will have to created out of thin air by the Fed Reserve to even begin to pay for it. Not as if Japan’s economy can afford this still on-gong crisis.
    Whomever built a nuke plant on *any* fault-line should be forced to live within eye’s view of their decision.
    Of course it’s all too late now as we’ve got several “aging” ticking time-bombs awaiting that “all bets are off” seismic surprise. Glad I don’t live near enough any nukes in my patch of Northern Virginia.

  10. Lugnut says:

    “No one in management ever thought of elevating the generators? Japan, being in the ring of fire, didn’t foresee a 9.0 earthquake? Is a 9.0 even the worst-case scenario considering the location of the reactors?”

    I agree 100% on that point, my main point, listening to the MSM fret how nukes are inherently unsafe is that considering the factors I mentioned, that 41 yr old plant contained its rods during two catastrophic events. Thats a positive, not a negative. The negative is human error on placement of the generators, and the political expediencey that made them stack reactors in the same site when they couldn’t get approvals for new sites. Those two factors bit them in the ass big time.

    And now I wonder how forthcoming they are about the actual state of those units. Given Japanese cultural tendencies, I suspect there is some face saving going on, at the expense of the safety of the public. Hoping its not as bad as it seems is not a usable plan.

  11. Sarge says:

    Well thank God we have ” Petey Wheatstraw” to teach us about corporate fecklessness, One can only imagine how much better things would be if the government had been in charge. They have such a great track record running things.

  12. Petey Wheatstraw says:

    Sarge:

    WTF are you talking about? The government worked fine for my entire lifetime (fine, but not perfectly), up until the point it was turned over to private/corporatist interests by self-hating, middle class dimwits such as yourself.

    Get off my cloud, bitch.

  13. Sarge says:

    @Taliesyn – you’re here in Northern Va with me and we are just a stones throw from Calvert Cliff s NR which of course is different than the Fukushima plant. CC is a pressurized water reactor vs the boiling water at Fukushima.

    I’m sure if CC went into meltdown we’d probably be ok but I would count on eating anything out of the Chesapeake for a few thousand years, not that there’s much left to eat there anyway.

  14. Sarge says:

    @Petey – you “are” on your own cloud, always squawking like a magpie over everything. Sheesh don’t you ever shut up? Why don’t you get out of your momma’s basement, put some clothes on and you know, get a real job. Obviously you don’t have one because you spend all your time squawking on here.

  15. Petey Wheatstraw says:

    Well, “Sarge,” I’ve been commenting here a long time. Doesn’t seem to draw much ire. As for gainful employment, I’ve got it pretty good. Private sector. How ’bout you? Still sucking the Federal dollar tit? With a handle like yours, and being located in NOVA (and, BTW, Lake Anna poses a much greater threat to you than Calvert Cliffs), I’ll bet 100% of your income comes directly from the taxpayer. No wonder our government doesn’t work.

    Go ahead as shoot back. I’m done with your sorry ass.

  16. To further the question, I asked this on another board. Why would you put a nuclear plant at sea level in an area that is prone to tsunamis? That has got to be in the top ten planning fails of all human history. If you need the seawater for cooling then you could at least elevate the plant or build it on a hill. It is not like you are lacking electricity to man pumps to pump that water up hill. You just happen to have all the electricity in the world.

    How do the smartest guys in the room always end up looking so dumb by the time they get to turn on the on switch?

  17. Taliesyn says:

    Sarge Says:
    March 17th, 2011 at 10:55 am
    @Taliesyn – you’re here in Northern Va with me and we are just a stones throw from Calvert Cliff s NR which of course is different than the Fukushima plant. CC is a pressurized water reactor vs the boiling water at Fukushima.

    This Japanese earthquake-induced nuke crisis in progress caused me to pull up the U.S. map of Nuke plants and we’ve got Calvert Cliffs in Maryland and North Anna nearer Richmond,Va. are way more than the 50 miles safe-distance the U.S. military at the crisis site in Northern Japan declared.
    Meanwhile the key-term is *earthquake-induced* and I also checked the US Geo Survey for a map of major fault-lines and living nearer the lap of the Blue Ridge Mt’s is geologically bucolic by comparison to say New Madras territory in Missouri.
    Finally I wouldn’t eat anything out of the Chesepeake just on general principal. Besides we’ve a wealth of functioning farms & vineyards & farmer’s markets where we are with everything from fresh produce & herbs to fruits & nuts to name your meat ( Ahhh, venison ). Frankly who needs anything from the Chesapeake.
    Been advocating my life-long friends back on my native haunts of Long Island to come on down considering how much they’re crying the blues over property taxes. Hell they’re paying more than a sub-$1million home in Great Falls , Virginia with at least 1/2 acre of land thrown in. West of Leesburg you’re already in Blue Ridge Mt. country. Besides even Gawd almighy Manhattan is on its own cracked rock fault-line. Felt it’s quiver in Autumn of 1985 whilst sleeping with the girl that convinced me to move back with her to her native Northern Virginia.
    Isn’t always a woman that can act as the tipping point.

  18. Sarge says:

    I’m out past Leesburg near Middleburg and you are spot on about the local attractions here but please tell your fellow long islanders to stay up there.

    Incidentally we had an earthquake here last summer (3.6). Woke me up at 5 am. That’s not going to bring down the house though.

  19. Sarge says:

    @Petey – yeah I know you’ve been commenting here a long time. Actually all the time. All I have to do is look at the RSS feed and mostly what I see is “Petey Wheatstraw squawks this, Petey squawks that”. Do you ever shut up? And unless you’re working for yourself, I’m sure your employer loves having you spend so much time on the internet.

  20. louis says:

    Um Sarge what is your beef with Petey? This is a blog what do you expect.

    By the way the world has changed exactly like Petey describes and some of the population is connected online 24/7.