Once you digest today’s punk unemployment data, here are some worthwhile Friday reads:

• Chinese Economic Slowdown May Lead to 75% Plunge in Commodities, S&P Says (Bloomberg)
• The Rising Price of Oil and the Quality of Your Asparagus (Daily Reckoning)
• Battle of the fund titans:
. . . .-David Einhorn’s Speech at the Sohn Conference (Insider Monkey)
. . . .-Bruce Berkowitz: ‘Beat the Pack by Breaking From It’ (Seeking Alpha)
• The Death of the American Dream I (American Interest)
• Daily Price Indexes show inflation is tame (Billion Prices Project)
• When Washington Took On Wall Street (Vanity Fair)
• Study finds many corporations pay tax rate of effectively zero (The Hill) see also GE, Exxon, 10 Other Major Corporations Paid Negative Tax Rate (MoJo)
Huge data dump: Statistics from A to Z – Beta version (OECD)
• Killer App: Army Tests Smartphones for Combat (WSJ)
• Practical Tips on Writing a Book from 23 Brilliant Authors (Neuro Tribes)

What are you reading?

Category: Financial Press

Please use the comments to demonstrate your own ignorance, unfamiliarity with empirical data and lack of respect for scientific knowledge. Be sure to create straw men and argue against things I have neither said nor implied. If you could repeat previously discredited memes or steer the conversation into irrelevant, off topic discussions, it would be appreciated. Lastly, kindly forgo all civility in your discourse . . . you are, after all, anonymous.

13 Responses to “Friday AM Reads”

  1. franklin411 says:

    Former tennis star Andre Agassi teams with L.A. bankers to finance charter school construction
    Agassi Charter School Facilities Fund is an unusual for-profit investment fund that intends to finance as much as $750 million in charter schools nationwide.
    http://articles.latimes.com/2011/jun/02/business/la-fi-agassi-fund-20110602

    I’m sure it’s purely a coincidence that the GOP came to power and proposed amputating limbs from education spending (“slashing” is too weak of a word to describe the bloodbath). Then the banks come along and offer for-profit replacements for what used to be available to citizens for free before the Republicans revived the Dark Ages.

    Purely a coincidence.

  2. Transor Z says:

    Why isn’t a movie currently in production called “Pecora”???

    It freaking writes itself.

  3. Stephen Jen talking about the ongoing slowdown, his expectations of a bad ending for the European debt crisis and the similarities of the current environment to the 1996-1997 USD weakness and the Asian Crisis.

    http://thetailchaser.blogspot.com/2011/06/stephen-jens-thoughts-on-ongoing.html

  4. Liminal Hack says:

    I’m reading “What Darwin Got Wrong” by Jerry Fodor and Massimo Piattelli Palmarini.

    Very heavy going for non-biologists and those without philosophy degrees, but nevertheless fascinating.

    Darwin got quite a bit wrong, it seems (or at least glossed over some rather important points), about how we and our other earthly companions all came to be.

  5. James says:

    Perhaps the jobs report crowded out this story:

    Greece Says Talks With Lenders End ‘Positively’

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/04/business/global/04euro.html?hpw

    Remember Greece? :)

  6. AHodge says:

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-06-03/sec-enforcers-said-to-weigh-release-of-report-on-lehman-abuses.html

    notes “a legal attack on Lehman accounting practices would likely fail”
    financial accounting is a complete do over, throw them out, retrain them situation..
    fuld etc are still saying “we were fine look at my last accounting statement.
    including in front of the FCIC

  7. willid3 says:

    neither admits they created the budget mess. its always the other guys. even when its not
    http://baselinescenario.com/2011/06/02/who-created-this-mess/

  8. willid3 says:

    and was that great improvement in US worker productivity…not? was it really imported?
    http://econompicdata.blogspot.com/2011/06/breaking-down-productivity.html

  9. MinnItMan says:

    The Walter Russell Mead article makes an interesting and stunningly obvious point (in retrospect) – 30 year financing for housing presumed stable career paths. Loss of employment stability – a slow train coming – makes residential real estate a much riskier proposition than it used to be.

  10. Greg0658 says:

    willid3 @4:22 I checked that link .. and I wonder if we can have high productivity when we create clean* jobs for ourselves and outsource the dirty jobs

    * desk work .. and ad spots (tv radio print) “and it didn’t cost me 1 red cent”