click for interactive graphic

Source: Chartsbin

Category: Analysts, Credit, Digital Media

Please use the comments to demonstrate your own ignorance, unfamiliarity with empirical data and lack of respect for scientific knowledge. Be sure to create straw men and argue against things I have neither said nor implied. If you could repeat previously discredited memes or steer the conversation into irrelevant, off topic discussions, it would be appreciated. Lastly, kindly forgo all civility in your discourse . . . you are, after all, anonymous.

5 Responses to “Standard & Poor’s Credit Rating by Country”

  1. mathman says:

    AUSTERITY AND ANARCHY: BUDGET
    CUTS AND SOCIAL UNREST IN
    EUROPE, 1919-2009
    http://www.voxeu.org/sites/default/files/file/DP8513.pdf
    “correlation, not causation” starts to look a little shaky in this 30 page, footnoted, macroeconomics paper

    “The data shows a clear link between the magnitude of expenditure cutbacks
    and increases in social unrest.”

  2. KellyD3 says:

    Interesting opinion on S&P’s (mistaken) views on sovereign debt
    http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-4107072,00.html

  3. Silversem says:

    I think in a few years there will be less bleu visible on this map. Global debt is a time bomb. That is why i buy gold: http://www.goudbelegger.com/index.php/beleggen-in-edelmetalen/2-beleggen-in-goud-en-zilver

  4. machinehead says:

    Somebody couldn’t color the map right. Or maybe they thought the UK is part of Ireland.

    The goof is corrected in the linked version at ChartsBin.

  5. SteveinMaine says:

    Funny, isn’t it, that the countries that are most financially stable are those that some folks would slam as being “most ‘socialist’”?

    They’re also countries with universal health care, the safest streets, extremely high educational testing scores, very long life expectancies, objectively among the highest standard of living, and the least amount of economic inequality. Huh.