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Five Countries That Offer Hidden Value

Hat tip Dave Wilson via i Shares

Category: Digital Media, ETFs, Investing

Please use the comments to demonstrate your own ignorance, unfamiliarity with empirical data and lack of respect for scientific knowledge. Be sure to create straw men and argue against things I have neither said nor implied. If you could repeat previously discredited memes or steer the conversation into irrelevant, off topic discussions, it would be appreciated. Lastly, kindly forgo all civility in your discourse . . . you are, after all, anonymous.

19 Responses to “CASSH: The Next PIIGS?”

  1. microtherion says:

    Can’t speak for the other countries on this list, but Switzerland’s GDP growth is projected to be below 1%, and while current debt levels are indeed moderate, the Swiss banks are very large relative to the country’s GDP, and their traditional business model of furthering foreign tax evasion is under massive attack, so I find it hard to argue that Switzerland is facing low systemic risk.

  2. HEHEHE says:

    Hong Kong isn’t a country.

  3. Jo says:

    I’d say that China represents some pretty impressive systemic (after a fashion) risk for the land of Oz.

  4. This includes many of the countries that I call “CaCA”. Canada, China and Australia……because their real estate markets smell like CaCA . Maybe CASSH if that’s what your looking to lose.

  5. constantnormal says:

    Why is not Chile in that list? It seems to fit the bill on all those attributes …

    http://www.businessinsider.com/in-case-youre-wondering-why-i-spend-so-much-time-down-here-2012-2

    http://www.economywatch.com/economic-statistics/year/2012/

    It’s not as big as those other economies, but aside from that, they seem to be more than competitive … possibly the worst part of their picture is that they remain more closely tied (at least in popular perception) to the image of a natural resources exporter, but then so are Canada and Australia …

  6. WallStreetRanter Says:
    February 14th, 2012 at 3:00 pm

    This includes many of the countries that I call “CaCA”. Canada, China and Australia……because their real estate markets smell like CaCA . Maybe CASSH if that’s what your looking to lose.
    ~~
    no kidding..

  7. Mark E Hoffer Says:
    February 14th, 2012 at 3:08 pm
    WallStreetRanter Says:
    February 14th, 2012 at 3:00 pm

    This includes many of the countries that I call “CaCA”. Canada, China and Australia……because their real estate markets smell like CaCA . Maybe CASSH if that’s what your looking to lose.
    ~~
    no kidding..

    ****
    Let me double-down on your bet – currency risk. Aussie dollars are flying, and though the Canadian dollar is down from a few years ago, it’s still strong. When China slows down, these commodity exporters are going to slow down too. I agree with WallStreetRanter…

    Economic slowdown + weakening currency = CASSH, if that’s what our looking to lose.

  8. machinehead says:

    Five years ago, the same pitch about ‘strong fundamentals’ would have accurately described Ireland. Everyone thought it would boom on … never mind the real estate bubble.

    Today, ‘Toronto has 148 high-rises and skyscrapers being built, compared with 59 tall buildings for No. 2-ranked New York City, and 22 in Chicago, according to Emporis, a Hamburg-based building data company.’ (source: Bloomberg article.)

    iShares offers some excellent funds. Too bad they’re sliming their hard-earned good name by going into the shilling, touting and fortune-telling business.

  9. crunched says:

    Hey BR, do you still wonder why people think the markets are broken and don’t want to play? ES up 10 points in 30 minutes. Next time it might be 10 points to the downside. 20 points to the downside… Who knows?

  10. constantnormal says:

    Interesting mix here. Just looking at GDP — which I know isn’t everything — the 2012 ECD projected world growth is 4.513%.

    Out of these 5 countries, exactly NONE of them are projected to have a GDP that beats the world average.

    Here they are:

    Australia 3.484%
    Canada 2.625%
    Hong Kong 4.193%
    Singapore 4.409%
    Switzerland 1.8%

    For reference, the US is estimated at 2.872% (I’ll be amazed if we do that well, but then these are amazing times)
    and the EU at 2.076% (ditto there). China pulls the average WAY up, with a projected gain of “only” 9.523% (and I’ll also be amazed if they hit that mark).

    There are a number of countries that beat the world average metric, but when you qualify that list with stable banking systems, low inflation, economies under control, central banks with wiggle room, the list gets smaller quickly.

    I wonder how close to the line separating analysis from marketing this Blackrock list sits. And on which side of it.

  11. investorinpa says:

    Or spelled a different way, SACHS (as in Goldman)

  12. MorticiaA says:

    @constantnormal, regarding Chile’s exclusion:
    Just a guess but it could be that Chile is considered an emerging market rather than developed.

  13. theexpertisin says:

    As if the White House braintrust wants you to have disposable cash to invest as you see fit. It appears they have a better use for it.

  14. Expat says:

    Almost, but not quite, an ethical investment list.

  15. constantnormal says:

    @MorticiaA

    … duh-oh! Yes, that would explain it.

  16. RC says:

    Looks like everyone’s got an acronym based on country that pretends to indicate something of value. Soon there will be a
    B – Brazil
    U – Uruguay
    L – Latvia
    L – Lithuania
    S – Singapore
    H – Hungary
    I – Indonesia
    T – Turkey
    get the drift?

    Like HEHEHE pointed out earlier that HongKong is not an independent country. Canada and Australia are “stuff” economies that each have their own housing bubbles.

  17. Union Agitator says:

    Singapore is a dictatorship, and Australia and Hong Kong live and die on what China does.

  18. Simon says:

    Good comments above. Clearly TBP is a hangout for critical thinkers.

  19. [...] hidden value opportunities rather than rioting and debt defaults (call them what you will). H/T Barry Ritholtz for the awesome infographic [...]