Click interactive chart to see which sectors have lost or gained the most jobs cumulatively since the recovery started:

Source: WSJ, January 4, 2012

Category: Economy, Markets

Please use the comments to demonstrate your own ignorance, unfamiliarity with empirical data and lack of respect for scientific knowledge. Be sure to create straw men and argue against things I have neither said nor implied. If you could repeat previously discredited memes or steer the conversation into irrelevant, off topic discussions, it would be appreciated. Lastly, kindly forgo all civility in your discourse . . . you are, after all, anonymous.

6 Responses to “Uneven Recovery – Jobs Power Market Rebound”

  1. Market Panic says:

    Larry Summers on the Labor Force Participation Rate
    http://brucekrasting.blogspot.com/2012/02/larry-summers-blows-it-on-tv.html

  2. Market Panic says:

    David Stockman about the recent “unequivocally strong NFP report”:

    “In short, if you spend a little time with these numbers you will know that they are being made up.”

    DAVID STOCKMAN: It’s True, The BLS Data Is Made Up
    http://www.businessinsider.com/david-stockman-its-true-the-bls-data-is-made-up-2012-2

  3. constantnormal says:

    I gotta disagree … “jobs” do not initiate the market rebound, they only determine how long it lasts … “animal spirits” initiate market rebounds …

  4. Julia Chestnut says:

    BR: look at these stats. Is it a decent-paying, middle class kind of job? Down. Is it a minimum wage job, or one that involves looking after the elderly in some fashion? Up. The only weird one is “business services” – what the hell is that, collection letters? Of course, education is also up – but we know how those jobs pay, as a rule.

    It kind of looks to me like the picture of an unbalanced economy. There are a couple of sectors seeing price increases far in excess of inflation – they are hiring. But should they be growing if they are that inefficient? We don’t need more concierge medical practices, we need infrastructure and manufacturing jobs.

  5. lippard says:

    “Is it a decent-paying, middle class kind of job? Down. Is it a minimum wage job, or one that involves looking after the elderly in some fashion? Up.”

    You see that in this data? I don’t think you can draw those conclusions from the data presented…

    “The only weird one is “business services” – what the hell is that, collection letters?”

    See http://www.hoovers.com/industry/business-services-sector/1054-1.html — any business that provides services to other businesses (“B2B”).

  6. Julia Chestnut says:

    lippard, my dear, your sense of humor may be a bit stenotic. Also, “any business that provides services to other businesses” is less descriptive than anything I could have come up with by pulling words out of a hat. Of course that is what it is – consider the breadth that is implied in that category: that’s the janitorial services who come in and empty your wastebasket each night and McKinsey. That’s a category?

    Back in the dark ages, one of my history professors noted to the class that when Great Britain started exporting nothing but services (banking and insurance, largely) it spelled the beginning of the end. Take a look at what you see in these (extremely abstracted) categories and tell me what YOU see. Traditionally, certain sectors provided a stronger living wage than others – and they didn’t tend to be services. Some jobs come with full benefits, others do not. What would you recommend that the average kid of average intelligence aim for in an economy that produced this mix in hiring?