I sat through multiple live blahgs about the new iPad, tweeted lots of funny things about it, and posted Apple by the numbers. I am kinda Appled and iPadded out.

Here is my afternoon train reading, blessedly Apple free:

• How Keynes overwhelmed Hayek (Times Literary Supplement)
• Shale gas and oil will add $5 billion to Ohio’s economy by 2014 (Cleveland.com)
• The 1% Captures Most Growth From Recovery (WSJ) see also Shiller: Don’t Resent the Rich; Fix the Tax Code (Part 3) (Bloomberg)
• Why incompetent people are too incompetent to know they’re incompetent (The Star)
• Seeding the Next Fortunes (Barron’s)
• The Original GM Bailout (Echos) see also Reflections on the crisis, thus far… (Alphaville)
• How Lenny Dykstra Got Nailed (SI Vault)
• Sometimes, Microsoft Designs Great Things. Here’s Why It Doesn’t Ever Matter (Fast CoDesign)
• Can you build a human body? (BBC) see also First life: The search for the first replicator (New Scientist)
• Philip K. Dick: The Exegete (LA Review of Books )

What are you reading?
>

If the Sweet 16 Were More Like Presidential Primaries

Category: Financial Press

Please use the comments to demonstrate your own ignorance, unfamiliarity with empirical data and lack of respect for scientific knowledge. Be sure to create straw men and argue against things I have neither said nor implied. If you could repeat previously discredited memes or steer the conversation into irrelevant, off topic discussions, it would be appreciated. Lastly, kindly forgo all civility in your discourse . . . you are, after all, anonymous.

16 Responses to “10 Amazingly “Apple Free” Linkfest”

  1. jaymaster says:

    Hah, great line in that Dykstra story:

    “How else could a player known more for his hustle than his smarts gain, after his retirement in 1996, improbable success as a day trader and stock-picking whiz. “Not only is he sophisticated,” Jim Cramer, the host of CNBC’s Wall Street handicapping show Mad Money, said of Dykstra in 2008, “but he’s one of the great ones.””

  2. M says:

    On the anosognosia thing: the NYT ran a much better article on it about a year ago.

    ~~~

    BR: What made that link interesting was the interview with Dunning (of Dunning Kruger effect fame).

  3. JimRino says:

    How much polluted fresh water will “shale gas” add?
    How high will the cancer clusters go?
    When Wind and Solar are now cheaper then new coal generation it’s insane to go to “shale gas”.
    With the south in a multi-year global warming drought, it’s INSANE to pick another carbon source.

  4. patfla says:

    Keynes vs. Hayek: This video ‘went viral’ (are there degrees of going viral?) so I wonder if there are people around TBP that haven’t seen it?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d0nERTFo-Sk&list=FL9JvLq6xxNc9WeazvBS13jg&index=19&feature=plpp_video

    I’ll throw in a couple of my other youtube favorites as a bonus:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AvxPc5MPEuQ&list=FL9JvLq6xxNc9WeazvBS13jg&index=3&feature=plpp_video (I’ve played guitar for decades).

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UfEffyyvMBI&list=FL9JvLq6xxNc9WeazvBS13jg&index=4&feature=plpp_video (wanna know Warren Buffett’s secret? – however the idea of (net earnings + dividends) / book-to-price is not a bad one).

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D1R-jKKp3NA&list=FL9JvLq6xxNc9WeazvBS13jg&index=7&feature=plpp_video (speaks, um, for itself).

  5. patfla says:

    JimRino> unfortunately, wind and solar are at grid parity (or levelized cost of electricity http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cost_of_electricity_by_source – take your pick) only either a) where this is not grid or b) where grid prices are high and insolation is also high.

    This is a remote part of Thailand and I assume there’s not grid either (or a very primitive one):

    http://www.nationmultimedia.com/business/Sonnedixs-first-solar-farm-in-Thailand-completed-30176582.html

  6. rd says:

    A link to the original Dunning-Kruger paper, a major advance in the mathematics of human resource management and winner of the 2000 Ig Nobel Prize for Psychology:

    http://people.psych.cornell.edu/~dunning/publications/pdf/unskilledandunaware.pdf

    The closing remarks are brilliant and could apply to nearly any technical paper, but the last three sentences should be a mandatory insertion in all economics papers:

    “We propose that those with limited knowledge in a domain suffer a dual burden: Not only do they reach mistaken conclusions and make regrettable errors, but their incompetence robs them of the ability to realize it. Although we feel we have done a competent job in making a strong case for this analysis, studying it empirically, and drawing out relevant implications, our thesis leaves us with one haunting worry that we cannot vanquish. That worry is that this article may contain faulty logic, methodological errors, or poor communication. Let us assure our readers that to the extent this article is imperfect, it is not a sin we have committed knowingly.”

  7. rd says:

    The original Dunning-Kruger won the 2000 Ig Nobel Prize for Psychology. It was a major advance in human resource management for effectively proving that the GE approach of moving the bottom 10% of staff out of the company was appropriate.

    The closing remarks are a classic and the last three sentences should be a mandatory insertion in all economics publications.

    We propose that those with limited knowledge in a domain suffer a dual burden: Not only do they reach mistaken conclusions and make regrettable errors, but their incompetence robs them of the ability to realize it. Although we feel we have done a competent job in making a strong case for this analysis, studying it empirically, and drawing out relevant implications, our thesis leaves us with one haunting worry that we cannot vanquish. That worry is that this article may contain faulty logic, methodological errors, or poor communication. Let us assure our readers that to the extent this article is imperfect, it is not a sin we have committed knowingly.

  8. NoKidding says:

    Coincidentally, the apple store sight is also “Apple Free”. Totally swamped, URL erroring.

  9. Mike in Nola says:

    Bless you, Anna. The bloggers seem to forget about the 90+% of us who aren’t interested in giant ipod touch’s, no matter how high the screen res is for watching all those TV reruns.

  10. PeterR says:

    Yeah, ditto —

    An Apple a day keeps the . . . . .

    whatever

  11. willid3 says:

    oil demand is collapsing
    http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2012/03/05/the_petrostates_of_america

    even in recovery oil usage is down

    a 1st

  12. “…Congress passed a law – by unanimous consent in the Senate and by a suspension of rules in the House – to permit the Federal government to arbitrarily arrest and imprison for up to ten years members of the serf class (formerly known as “American citizens”) whose presence annoys or offends specally designated members of the elite and foreign dignitaries. A list that will no doubt expand greatly in future legislation to include very “special” private citizens.
    Think about that, future “Joe the Plumbers” or Cindy Sheehans, before you ask an impertinent question of your betters or wave your handmade cardboard sign. Is ten seconds of glory on your local ABC affiliate news at 5 o’clock worth that felony arrest record and federally funded anal exam?
    No? Then kindly shut your mouth, sir. Learn your place.
    Two nebbish Representatives, one Republican and one Democrat, distinguished only by their lack of legislative or political importance, sponsored the bill on behalf of the big boys who fast-tracked it under the radar (they learned from the SOPA debacle). Forget ideology or boasts about carrying a copy of the Constitution in the breast pocket of their suit, whether you are in an archconservative Congressional district or an ultraliberal one, almost every member of Congress voted “aye” to trash multiple amendments in the Bill of Rights…”
    http://poorrichards-blog.blogspot.com/2012/03/era-of-creepy-state-is-here.html
    ~~
    “…Consider the case of Leyla Wydler, a broker who, back in 2003, sent a letter to the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) about her former employer, the Stanford Financial Group. A year earlier, it had fired her for refusing to sell certificates of deposit that she rightly suspected were being misleadingly advertised to investors. The company, Wydler warned in her letter, “is the subject of a lingering corporate fraud scandal perpetrated as a ‘massive Ponzi scheme’ that will destroy the life savings of many, damage the reputation of all associated parties, ridicule securities and banking authorities, and shame the United States of America.”

    It was a letter that should have woken the dead and, as it happened, couldn’t have been more on target. Wydler didn’t stop with the SEC either. She also sent copies to the National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD), the trade group responsible for enforcing regulations throughout the industry, as well as various newspapers, including the Wall Street Journal and the Washington Post. No one responded. No one at all…”
    http://www.counterpunch.org/2012/03/06/chilling-dissent-on-wall-street/

    yesterday was a *Good Day for a ‘Press Conference’..

  13. RW says:

    Income inequality and poverty are increasing in the United States but decreasing in Mexico and Brazil. One reason may simply be, To Beat Back Poverty, Pay the Poor.

  14. nicejob says:

    You might be Apple-pied, but this will open your eyes. Blow thru your monthly data quota in minutes:

    http://bit.ly/wQclct

  15. AHodge says:

    keynes Vs hayek– Times of london and cogdon version– looks mostly wrong in essence tho a lot of good tidbits
    Hayek was largely defrocked at LSE for classisist extremism like immediate budget balancing in the early 30s–not even a contest w Keynes who i’d grant was all over th place early 30s with evolving views.
    Unemployed– he was taken under Keynes wing at cambridge– and finally proved useful much later with road to serfdom
    A book that keynes- and George Soros among others– found valuable and original-as i do
    the video of Soros coming to honor Hayek at his AEI retrospective is priceless
    and explains how hayek has been hijacked by more extremist “free market” kooks
    the popular simplified keynes vs hayek partly reflects the latter views.
    but you could do worse for neophytes