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Each month, we look at the books purchased by readers of TBP.

This is hardly an objective or fair  list — thy tend to include items I have mentioned (and can therefore track at Amazon). Additionally, this list itself has become somewhat incestuous, as appearance here leads to more sales, which leads to next month’s appearance here. Its totally anonymous — I don’t know who bought what — but there’s lots of data on the various books generated.

One Caveat: Josh crushed all comers in March, but that also reflects February preorders that shipped last month. (That’s why he is number 1 with a bullet!).

In order, these were the most popular TBP books for March (ties are ordered by author last name):

Backstage Wall Street: An Insider’s Guide to Knowing Who to Trust, Who to Run From, and How to Maximize Your Investments (Joshua Brown)

The Information: A History, A Theory, A Flood (James Gleick)

When to Sell: Inside Strategies for Stock-Market Profits (Justin Mamis)

Thinking, Fast and Slow (Daniel Kahneman)

The Behavior Gap: Simple Ways to Stop Doing Dumb Things with Money (Carl Richards)

Bailout Nation (Barry Ritholtz)

A Gift to My Children: A Father’s Lessons for Life and Investing (Jim Rogers)

Traders, Guns and Money: Knowns and unknowns in the dazzling world of derivatives (Satyajit Das)

Panderer to Power (Frederick Sheehan)

This Time Is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly (Carmen M. Reinhart)

Civilization: The West and the Rest (Niall Ferguson)

How We Know What Isn’t So: The Fallibility of Human Reason in Everyday Life (Thomas Gilovich)

The Most Important Thing: Uncommon Sense for the Thoughtful Investor (Howard Marks)

Currency Wars: The Making of the Next Global Crisis (James Rickards)

Category: Consumer Spending

Please use the comments to demonstrate your own ignorance, unfamiliarity with empirical data and lack of respect for scientific knowledge. Be sure to create straw men and argue against things I have neither said nor implied. If you could repeat previously discredited memes or steer the conversation into irrelevant, off topic discussions, it would be appreciated. Lastly, kindly forgo all civility in your discourse . . . you are, after all, anonymous.

3 Responses to “Books Bought By Big Picture Readers (March 2012)”

  1. JimRino says:

    How about the textbook Shiller uses for his Yale class: Stocks for the Long Run, 4th Edition.
    There’s a Kindle version.

  2. Stocks for the Long Run by Jeremy Siegel?

    No thanks

  3. JimRino says:

    And Shiller’s Latest: Finance and the Good Society.
    Why don’t you do an interview, a long, in-depth interview.
    That would be very interesting, as shiller is not Delusional about Economics.