My longer form readings for your weekend enjoyment — this may be my favorite list in a long time:

• Why Too Much Data Disables Your Decision Making (Psychology Today)
• The Science Behind Those Obama Campaign E-Mails (Businessweek)
• The Ups and Downs of Making Elevators Go (WSJ)
• Entitlements Scare Tactics (The Baseline Scenariosee also Greedy Geezers, Reconsidered (The American Prospect)
• The rise and fall of Lenny Dykstra (Newsday)
• We Are Alive: Profile of Bruce Springsteen at sixty-two (The New Yorker)
• The History of Boredom (Smithsonian Magazine)
• Why the Art World Is So Loathsome (Slate)
• The Making of a Philosophy Professor (The Chronicle)
• The Demonic Genius of Daniel Tosh (The Atlantic) see also What’s so funny? (The Times Literary Supplement)

What are you reading?

 

Apple’s Power Within

Source: WSJ

 

Category: Financial Press

Please use the comments to demonstrate your own ignorance, unfamiliarity with empirical data and lack of respect for scientific knowledge. Be sure to create straw men and argue against things I have neither said nor implied. If you could repeat previously discredited memes or steer the conversation into irrelevant, off topic discussions, it would be appreciated. Lastly, kindly forgo all civility in your discourse . . . you are, after all, anonymous.

10 Responses to “10 Weekend Reads”

  1. jball says:

    Here’s a cool read for you…
    Cyclenews.com, scroll down the latest news to “Mert Lawill pays it forward”

  2. Bob is still unemployed   says:

    I spent some time looking through the high-resolution pictures and the movie of Views of Earth at Night.

  3. VennData says:

    More job-killing delays sue to Obama’s Socialist obstinacy on raising taxes on the job-creators / opportunity creators!!

    North Korea to Delay Rocket-Launch Time Frame

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323316804578167312175798482.html

  4. slowkarma says:

    I found this article interesting in the NYT a couple days ago:

    http://economix.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/12/06/the-real-fiscal-risks-in-the-united-states/

    Of the 10 Weekend Reads above, I found “Entitlement Scare Tactics” to be pretty interesting, but it’s companion piece (in The American Prospect) to be fairly goofy.

    One thing that happened in the eighties and nineties is that some economists warned that we were spending our children’s future, and that had to be fixed. Then we had some boom times, and so on, and it was sort of forgotten…but haven’t those guys back in the eighties and nineties proved to be pretty much right? Young people, even college grads, struggle to find first jobs, and the unemployment rate, in which 5% was once considered a problem, has been around 7-8% for a very long time now, so even experienced people can’t find work, and the infrastructure is crumbling and we can’t find the money to fix it. Back in the fifties and sixties, we built most of the interstate system including buying the land and doing all the ground prep, without even stretching, and now we can’t even patch it.

    So a piece saying that the doom didn’t come to pass, and probably won’t in the future, seems a bit odd…we’re actually living through the first part of it. Unless Apple can sell 20 trillion dollars worth of new cell phones, I don’t see where the supposed recovery is going to come from…

  5. Joe Friday says:

    David Brooks, during his appearance on the PBS Newshour, discussing Fridays jobs report:

    I too fixated on the Labor Force Participation Rate, in which I think there were 350,000 fewer people in the labor force. If you step back and look at this recession, the collapse in labor force participation is astounding.

    What’s “astounding” is how only now during the Obama administration, has Brooks and the rest of the American RightWing suddenly discovered the ‘Labor Force Participation Rate’.

    Many of us pointed out at the time that the Labor Force Participation Rate not just collapsed, but went plummeting over a cliff starting in the first Chimpy Bush term and has never looked back, but they would merely respond that the Unemployment Rate number was declining.

    Of course, if the national labor force is shrinking because workers are leaving the workforce and joining the Long-term Unemployed, a falling Unemployment Rate number is an indicator of rising unemployment not falling unemployment.

    Yet another to add to the long list of Bizarro World beliefs by the American RightWing.

  6. Joe Friday says:

    slowkarma,

    One thing that happened in the eighties and nineties is that some economists warned that we were spending our children’s future, and that had to be fixed. Then we had some boom times, and so on, and it was sort of forgotten…but haven’t those guys back in the eighties and nineties proved to be pretty much right?

    No, they were wrong then and they’re still wrong now.

    Back in the fifties and sixties, we built most of the interstate system including buying the land and doing all the ground prep, without even stretching, and now we can’t even patch it.

    Back in the fifties and sixties, the top federal income tax rates were 87% and 77%, and corporations actually paid taxes.

  7. Bob A says:

    I’m thinking of that chart like a rohrschach blot…
    What do you see in that blot?

    Do you see an Apple that will continue to dominate?
    For how long?
    Or do you see an Apple that will eventually fade into Rimmblivion?
    Would this happen in a similar time frame to what’s happened to Rimm?
    Or how long might this take?

    It would be interesting to see how people’s views correlate to how much Apple stock
    or how many Apple products they own.

  8. 4whatitsworth says:

    No one told this guy a freshman has no chance at the heisman!

    http://espn.go.com/blog/statsinfo/post/_/id/57611/manziels-heisman-win-is-first-of-its-kind

  9. ilsm says:

    Discretionary spending is more scary than entitlements over the coming 75 years, and dcretionary spending has no dedicated tax stream, just cash borrowed from payroll taxes.

    If the war machine continues on with the undying support of unwarranted influence, $66,000B will be wasted marshalling and maintaining “forces” to reenact the ETO and PTO of WW II with a Korea on the side.

    Germany, Japan and China are trading partners who together will spend $10,000B over the 75 years.