My morning reads:

• Economists Use Shoddy Data (Slate)
Bull: The first word in mangled meanings (FT.com)
• Washington is fixing the debt crisis (FT.com)
• Conrad Black: The positive side of America’s new malaise (National Post)
• The Good News about Big, Bad Government Debt (The Fiscal Times)
• Greek austerity is going too far, Charles Dallara warns (The Guardian)
• Apple CEO Cook Makes Second China Visit as Stores Double (Bloomberg) see also WSJ once again claims Apple working on less-expensive iPhone, this time for late 2013 (9TO5Mac)
• Obama’s Nominations Mean Military Is Being Downsized, But Covert Operations Are Gearing Up (Washington’s Blog)
• The future according to Google’s Larry Page (Fortune)
• Have We Lost the War on Drugs? (WSJ)

What are you reading?

 

Retail Centers See Modest Growth

Source: WSJ

Category: Financial Press

Please use the comments to demonstrate your own ignorance, unfamiliarity with empirical data and lack of respect for scientific knowledge. Be sure to create straw men and argue against things I have neither said nor implied. If you could repeat previously discredited memes or steer the conversation into irrelevant, off topic discussions, it would be appreciated. Lastly, kindly forgo all civility in your discourse . . . you are, after all, anonymous.

11 Responses to “10 Mid-Week AM Reads”

  1. MarcG says:

    Your link to Ft.com article “Washington fixing debt crisis” is not working (for me, in Canada, anyway). This is where I found it directly on their site:
    http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/aca8d6f2-58bd-11e2-99e6-00144feab49a.html#axzz2HUxUPdl4

  2. AHodge says:

    tks MarcG
    i can kind of get with Altmans shocking to some “Washington is fixing the Debt crisis”
    at least glass half full
    if you add up the earlier spending cuts
    and this deal.
    and that sequester will generate more cuts or a better negotioated distribution of more cuts
    –forget the debt ceiling for moment

    this is actually a lot of progress and about all we can bear for austerity at the moment
    further cuts maybe more than we can bear but we give ourselves 2 more months at leat to look
    also we broke the nordquist curse,
    which will also certainly theologically enable Rs to eventually cut back on some deductions for revenue
    also a norquist pledge

  3. thomas hudson says:

    nasa press release showing new study linking solar activity to global climate:

    http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2013/08jan_sunclimate/

    In recent years, researchers have considered the possibility that the sun plays a role in global warming. After all, the sun is the main source of heat for our planet. The NRC report suggests, however, that the influence of solar variability is more regional than global. The Pacific region is only one example.

    Caspar Amman of NCAR noted in the report that “When Earth’s radiative balance is altered, as in the case of a chance in solar cycle forcing, not all locations are affected equally. The equatorial central Pacific is generally cooler, the runoff from rivers in Peru is reduced, and drier conditions affect the western USA.”

  4. willid3 says:

    seems that the US tries to use the private sector for public good thinking it will be more cost effective only to find its not.

    2 examples. seems there was a study of retirement facilities for the elderly that had been converted from non profit to for profit. and they discovered that in the for profit facilities there was more sedatives (as much as 4 times the rate) as non profits did. turns out there is a reason for that. seems that if you sedate the patients you can reduce the number of staff per patient on your payroll. also turns out to spike the number of patients dieing too.

    another example was trying to use HMO’s for Medicare. turns out the results from this instead of controlling costs actually instead spiked them by up 12% per patient.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/09/business/health-care-and-pursuit-of-profit-make-a-poor-mix.html?partner=rss&emc=rss&_r=0

  5. AHodge says:

    As for jack lew treasury secy i think im dissappointed
    and that O bows out of cliff where he would be needed for any alternative to sequester deal on the d side
    Lew looks basically like a policy strictly through managing image to the electorate. not whats right

    has interesting background
    but is being hyped– COO of Citi alternate investments when they bet against housing? not
    i think the mother jones narrative of his time there is right

    QUOTE Citi paid Lew $1.1 million for his year at Alternative Investments, according to an ethics disclosure report filed in January 2009. He was also eligible for an undisclosed bonus….His unit, though, lost as much as billions of dollars in 2008 as its bets turned sour. In the first quarter of 2008 alone the unit lost $509 million; the company stopped publicly disclosing the unit’s individual numbers soon thereafter, but the part of the company that absorbed Alternative Investments lost $20.1 billion in 2008, according to the bank’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission

    Citigroup, as you might recall, also received $45 billion in TARP money
    .UNQUOTE

  6. AHodge says:

    Citi alternate investments owned a share of John Paulson when he made his short subprime money
    but by time Lew inherited the CITI o-peration
    paulson started losing his shirt and the fund otherwise lost big in 2008

  7. beaufou says:

    From the Guardian article on Greece:
    “policymakers now had to be more creative and “think outside the box” by easing the pace of fiscal adjustment, which had brought “tremendous stress to Greek society”

    Policymakers will “think outside the box” or in a momentary lapse of modern reason realize that ordinary workers are not the cause of the disaster. When did common sense flew out the box?

  8. beaufou says:

    When did common sense flew out the box?
    fly…sorry

  9. AHodge says:

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-01-09/feldstein-who-speared-whale-ready-to-unwind-derivatives.html
    fascinating stuff on Bluemountain
    i am skeptical about his “spearing” JPMorgan
    its more like they are buddies and counterparties
    they have been buying European bank derivatives portfolios, who knows how they account for that
    i wouldnt own this fund for anything.