My afternoon train reading:

• Howard Oaks, Guru to the Stars (Barron’s)
• Most-Admired Companies Aren’t Always Great Investments (WSJ) see also Is Anything Cheap? (WSJ)
• CIMA revokes HSBC Mexico licence (Cayman Net News)
• In major policy shift, scores of FDIC settlements go unannounced (Los Angeles Times)
• Bernanke Provokes Mystery Over Fed Stimulus Exit (Bloomberg) and yet Dollar rallies across the board, cheered by U.S. jobs data (Reuters)
• Congress is the Biggest Threat to the Jobs Recovery (The Fiscal Times)
• Uninsured Americans Get Hit With Biggest Hospital Bills (Bloomberg)
• How the Iraq war hurt Republicans (Washington Post)
• No Comment? (Law of Integrity)
• Eric Clapton’s New Album ‘Old Sock’ Streaming at (Speakeasy)

What are you reading?

 

 
Firms Send Record Cash Back to Investors

Source: WSJ

Category: Financial Press

Please use the comments to demonstrate your own ignorance, unfamiliarity with empirical data and lack of respect for scientific knowledge. Be sure to create straw men and argue against things I have neither said nor implied. If you could repeat previously discredited memes or steer the conversation into irrelevant, off topic discussions, it would be appreciated. Lastly, kindly forgo all civility in your discourse . . . you are, after all, anonymous.

13 Responses to “10 Monday PM Reads”

  1. rd says:

    The uninsured, often less-educated and poor, just need to get much better at negotiating with the hospitals. Oh…wait… they’re unconscious or delirious while many of the charges are being racked up. Oh well, so it goes – at least we can rely on the private sector relentlessly driving costs down through the rational efficient hand of the market.

    The best part is that if they can get the charges written off to a level that an insurance company or Medicare would actually be paying, then the IRS may be able to declare the written off amount as taxable income, so they get to pay Uncle Sam his cut.
    http://www.marketwatch.com/story/settling-debts-can-raise-your-tax-bill-2013-03-11?link=home_carousel

  2. Singmaster says:

    Thank you Mr Ritholtz for enforcing civility on your blog comments. Apparently it helps us all:
    http://www.npr.org/2013/03/11/174027294/the-nasty-effect-how-comments-color-comprehension
    At its best, the Web is a place for unlimited exchange of ideas.
    The uncivil discourse that unfolds in comments sections can be poisonous.
    A study in the Journal of Computer Mediated Communication suggests that rude comments on news stories can change the way we understand reporting.
    In detail:
    Uncivil discourse is a growing concern in American rhetoric, and this trend has expanded beyond traditional media to online sources, such as audience comments…We found that exposure to uncivil blog comments can polarize risk perceptions…
    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jcc4.12009/full

  3. Singmaster says:

    Thank you Mr Ritholtz for enforcing civility on your blog comments. Apparently it helps us all:

    http://www.npr.org/2013/03/11/174027294/the-nasty-effect-how-comments-color-comprehension
    At its best, the Web is a place for unlimited exchange of ideas.
    The uncivil discourse that unfolds in comments sections can be poisonous.
    A study in the Journal of Computer Mediated Communication suggests that rude comments on news stories can change the way we understand reporting.
    In detail:
    Uncivil discourse is a growing concern in American rhetoric, and this trend has expanded beyond traditional media to online sources, such as audience comments…We found that exposure to uncivil blog comments can polarize risk perceptions…
    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jcc4.12009/full

  4. romerjt says:

    So my New Year’s resolution to not be sarcastic, snarky or cynical is seriously challenged by the testimony(and video) of the honorable (opps) regulators questioned by Senator Warren and then this . . . the Cayman Islands revoke the charter of HSBC . . . I would have thought this was unbelievable but then Dennis Rodman did go to N Korea setting new boundaries for reality based news. Oh dear!

  5. Moss says:

    Amazing how the Cayman Islands whacks HSBC yet the US does nada.

  6. mathman says:

    http://www.angrybearblog.com/2013/03/trans-pacific-partnership-new.html#

    Trans Pacific Partnership: A new Constitution

    (from the article)

    This document is the constitution of a new world order. It is an order that has been the dream of many for ages upon ages that until this time in humanity was not possible do to the limits of the technology of the time. This is the document of what I coined a few years ago as The United Corporations of Global. It is this aspect of the document that the people of the world should be most fearful of. It is not a trade agreement as I believe the common man (as in the court concept of the “common man”) would think of the phrase “trade agreement”. This is a constitution that is coming prepackaged with the rules and regulations already written. Only, there is no need for ratification to be a part of the creative process. This document comes pre-ratified in that all a nation has to do is say “I’m in”. It does not take a majority of the worlds nations or a super majority like the original 13 colonies for this document to have power. It has power because those writing it already agree to follow it. Passing it in the US? Can you say “fast track”?

  7. Robert M says:

    Not always my cup of tea, always easier to listen to than watch; David Bowie has a new album out. The NYT review yesterday was very on point.

  8. S Brennan says:

    File under: Iran’s Mullahs need to GET.A.LIFE

    “Iran’s religious conservatives have reacted furiously to President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad hugging the distraught mother of late Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez at his funeral, describing the gesture as “un-Islamic”.

    If the Mullahs keep this up the only place they will be able to find work is FOX NEWS…or the Wall Street Journal.

    http://www.france24.com/en/20130310-ahmadinejad-un-islamic-hug-chavez-mother-iran#comments

  9. Robert M says:

    “Firms Send Record Cash Back to Investors”
    Do not understand why this claim is being made. Price appreciation is not cash unless you sell. Cash would be a dividend.

  10. farmera1 says:

    Fortune Tech March 18, 2013 issue, p63

    The $35.00 PC

    “The Raspberry Pi is a personal computer at its’ most Zen: motherboard, memory, connectors and not much else.”

    Looks like fun for the DIY crowd.

  11. petessake says:

    Pete’s pushing the boundaries of civil discourse here, yet what in the wide, wide world of sports does the department of homeland insecurity need with 1.6 billion rounds of ammunition, much of it illegal expanding or hollow-point bullets, and hundreds or thousands of armored combat vehicles – for a war here in the streets of the US? This once was the land of the free; but now is the land of the not-so-free and the home of the not-so-brave.

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/ralphbenko/2013/03/11/1-6-billion-rounds-of-ammo-for-homeland-security-its-time-for-a-national-conversation/

    At risk of losing the argument at the outset, how many rounds it the Wehrmacht have in 1941 for Barbarossa?

    H/T – cross-posted by Jesse

    Sequestor this, mf; PLEASE.

  12. VennData says:

    One GOP Lawmaker Shows How to Woo Latino Voters

    “…You just have to show up, all the time, everywhere…”

    Why, he has quantum properties! That’s the secret! Any GOP lawmaker can continue to talk about how tax cuts actually decrease the deficit if they are simultaneously showing the characteristics of particles AND waves!

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323864304578318362595242542.html

  13. Bjørn says:

    From the • Uninsured Americans Get Hit With Biggest Hospital Bills (Bloomberg) link:

    “So-called full charges at hospitals grew an average 10 percent a year between 2000 and 2010,
    according to Gerard Anderson, a Johns Hopkins University professor who analyzed hospital
    financial reports. The charges went up at four times the pace of inflation, and
    faster than hospital costs, which Anderson said increased an average 6 percent a year.”

    Having spent many years in the medical arena (partially on the charge master side) the 10% increase PER YEAR for EVERYTHING ON THE MENU for the uninsured has been going on infinitum (hence the $5.00 bandaid). And nobody takes them to task (court) because as usual the little guy gets his yearly screwing.