The ‘Big Data’ Revolution: How Number Crunchers Can Predict Our Lives

Reviews:

“Every decade, there are a handful of books that change the way you look at everything. This is one of those books. Society has begun to reckon the change that big data will bring. This book is an incredibly important start.”
—Lawrence Lessig, Roy L. Furman Professor of Law, Harvard Law School, and author of Remix and Free Culture

“This brilliant book cuts through the mystery and the hype surrounding big data. A must-read for anyone in business, information technology, public policy, intelligence, and medicine. And anyone else who is just plain curious about the future.”
—John Seely Brown, former Chief Scientist, Xerox Corp., and head of Xerox Palo Alto Research Center

“Big Data breaks new ground in identifying how today’s avalanche of information fundamentally shifts our basic understanding of the world. Argued boldly and written beautifully, the book clearly shows how companies can unlock value, how policymakers need to be on guard, and how everyone’s cognitive models need to change.”
—Joi Ito, Director of the MIT Media Lab

“An optimistic and practical look at the Big Data revolution — just the thing to get your head around the big changes already underway and the bigger changes to come.”
—Cory Doctorow, boingboing.com

“Just as water is wet in a way that individual water molecules aren’t, big data can reveal information in a way that individual bits of data can’t. The authors show us the surprising ways that enormous, complex, and messy collections of data can be used to predict everything from shopping patterns to flu outbreaks.”
—Clay Shirky, author of Cognitive Surplus and Here Comes Everybody

 

Source:
The ‘Big Data’ Revolution: How Number Crunchers Can Predict Our Lives
NPR Staff March 07, 2013
http://www.npr.org/2013/03/07/173176488/the-big-data-revolution-how-number-crunchers-can-predict-our-lives

Category: Books

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