My afternoon train reading:

• Did Apple make the iPhone 4 too good? (MarketWatch) see also Apple’s Bear Case Remains Intact (MoneyBeat)
• A Bullish Magazine Cover Is The Silliest Reason To Sell Stocks (Business Insider)
Wolf: Austerity loses an article of faith (FT.com)
• 10 investing rules for the coming bond crash (MarketWatch)
• High Frequency Trading and the Hacked Associated Press Twitter Account (Policy Shop) see also Fake Tweet Erasing $136 Billion Shows Markets Need Humans (Bloomberg)
• What BP Doesn’t Want You to Know About the 2010 Gulf Spill (The Daily Beast)
• The Business of Blowing People Up (priceonomics) see also America’s 99-Year War Against Terrorist Bombers (Echoes)
Bright Minds and Dark Attitudes: Lower Cognitive Ability Predicts Greater Prejudice Through Right-Wing Ideology and Low Intergroup Contact (Sage)
• How the Wheels Came Off for Fisker (WSJ) see also Breaking Down on the Road to Electric Cars (NYT)
• Couch Slouch on the 2013 NBA playoffs (Washington Post)

What are you reading?

 

Wall Street Jobs Plunge as Profits Soar

Source: Bloomberg

Category: Financial Press

Please use the comments to demonstrate your own ignorance, unfamiliarity with empirical data and lack of respect for scientific knowledge. Be sure to create straw men and argue against things I have neither said nor implied. If you could repeat previously discredited memes or steer the conversation into irrelevant, off topic discussions, it would be appreciated. Lastly, kindly forgo all civility in your discourse . . . you are, after all, anonymous.

10 Responses to “10 Mid-Week PM Reads”

  1. hue says:

    Holy F_cking Sh_t. That’s Dzhokhar! (Esquire)

    Taibbi on the BS Report (ESPN Audio)

  2. willid3 says:

    the 401k. not exactly what you thought it was.
    http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/04/even-harsh-frontline-program-on-retirement-investments-understates-how-bad-they-are.html

    the fees probably over whelm your returns over all. unless you are lucky

  3. willid3 says:

    there was this http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/mike-elk-the-texas-fertilizer-plant-explosion-cannot-be-forgotten/2013/04/23/48eb770c-ac26-11e2-b6fd-ba6f5f26d70e_story_1.html
    so why is is that West seems to have disappeared after less than week? it killed more people than Boston bombers did, and hurt more too. maybe its because it was business that did it?

  4. James Cameron says:

    I bet.

    “Due to his 20 plus years of service in the U.S. Army and his post-retirement career, Sen. Inhofe finds John Bonsell uniquely qualified to understand the perspective of both the government and the private sector as the committee works to address unprecedented challenges with the future of our national defense.”

    In Key Senate Job, Ex-Lockheed Exec Replaced by Ex-Lockheed Lobbyist

    http://goo.gl/CFpaC

  5. formerlawyer says:

    App for fraud. RFID chip can be read through your wallet and clothes with a Smartphone.
    http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/story/2013/04/24/nl-smartphone-credit-card-skimming-app-424.html

  6. rd says:

    The drumbeat continues about how bad bonds are. Bonds aren’t great right now but neither are stocks with several long-term valuation measurements at levels where 30%+ market crashes have occurred in the past.

    Bonds play a fundamental role in protecting against deflation and are often not quite in sync with stocks so that re-balancing can mitigate soem risk for both. A diversified bond fund, such as Vanguard Total Bond Index has a maturity of about 7 years and duration of about 5 years so there will be a lot of turnover buying new bonds at higher rates during a 10 year bond bear market like the 1970s. Meanwhile, it is likely that money would be moving in and out of the bocks due to rebalancing of the stock-bond mix during the periodic equity bull and bear markets that occur during that period. Since hte bonds will often increase in value during a stock arket plunge, they do reduce overall portfolio risk.

    In general, I view buying a 30-year bond as a major risk, similar buying an equity but it is relatively simple to end up with something with substantially less risk. After all, the alternatives are what? Hedge funds that will let a small investor buy in?

  7. wisegrowth says:

    Declining low labor share of income is killing the Fed funds rate. As labor share declines, it is pushing the Fed funds rate into a zone of a permanent liquidity trap. here is the link to the graph and explanation… The graph should sound an alarm… a big alarm.
    http://effectivedemand.typepad.com/ed/2013/04/the-progressive-death-of-the-fed-funds-rate.html

  8. 873450 says:

    GE – corp welfare queen gets taxpayer bailout, earns huge profit, pays no taxes, but has conscience?

    http://money.msn.com/top-stocks/post.aspx?post=c3c592b4-5b7d-4aa3-a2d3-87b4210cb162

    GE Won’t Finance Gun Purchases

    “The company has stopped offering financing for gun purchases to small gun shops. The move comes after the Newtown shooting… GE is based in Fairfield, Conn… GE Chief Executive Jeff Immelt held a town hall meeting with affected employees … [Psycho killer] Lanza’s father is a GE employee.”

    Conscience Not

    “GE’s ban applies only to retailers whose sole business is selling firearms, an ‘insignificant and immaterial’ part of GE Capital’s business… still doing business with merchants with more diverse lines of business, including Wal-Mart Stores, the nation’s largest seller of guns and ammunition… The company began offering financing for retail purchases to gun shops in 2006… Two years later, however, the company stopped taking on new gun-shop customers but continued to finance existing customers… smaller lenders have stepped into the gap and are expanding their efforts.”