My afternoon train reads:

• Why the Stock Market Goes Up As Jobs Go Nowhere (Financial Sense)
• This is the VaR that slipped through the cracks (FT Alphaville)
• Why China’s economy might topple (FT.com) see also China’s Post-crisis Borrowing Boom Comes Home to Roost for Local Authorities (Institutional Investor)
• Savings Glut meets the Great Recession (Fatas and Mihov)
• Traders Welcome Fed’s Minutes Snafu (WSJ) see also Helicopter QE will never be reversed (Telegraph)
• Handicapping Labor Data (Tim Duy’s Fed Watch)
• The New Central America Second Home Buyers (World Property Channel) see also U.S. Land Gets More Expensive (WSJ)
• How High Should Top Income Tax Rates Be? (Hint: Much Higher) (Fiscal Times)
• America’s Three Elections: One For The Rich, One For The Crazy, And One For Everyone Else (priceonomics)
• Wicked cool new iPhone app: Status Board (Status Board)

What are you reading?

 

Money Spigot Opens Wider

Source: WSJ

Category: Financial Press

Please use the comments to demonstrate your own ignorance, unfamiliarity with empirical data and lack of respect for scientific knowledge. Be sure to create straw men and argue against things I have neither said nor implied. If you could repeat previously discredited memes or steer the conversation into irrelevant, off topic discussions, it would be appreciated. Lastly, kindly forgo all civility in your discourse . . . you are, after all, anonymous.

11 Responses to “10 Mid-Week PM Reads”

  1. 4whatitsworth says:

    What culd be in the N. Korean Satelite?

    http://modernsurvivalblog.com/emp-electro-magnetic-pulse/suspect-super-emp-orbit-over-united-states/

    One for the ultra paranoid. I just wish it just did not seem so possible.

  2. farmera1 says:

    Another article about income inequality in the US.

    LIFE IN AMERICA: 3 Million Overlords And 300 Million Serfs

    http://www.businessinsider.com/wealth-and-income-inequality-in-america-2013-4?op=1

  3. nofoulsontheplayground says:

    ZeroHedge – “Fed Releases Names of Early FOMC Minutes Recipients”

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-04-10/fed-releases-names-early-fomc-minutes-recipients-include-employees-goldman-barclays-

    Apparently nobody who received the Fed minutes early notified the Fed. I’m shocked! Shocked! (to borrow a phrase from the movie, “Casablanca.”

  4. bergsten says:

    “Status Board” is iPad only, not iPhone.

  5. wisegrowth says:

    Working on models of recession detection…
    http://effectivedemand.typepad.com/ed/2013/04/using-real-gdi-in-the-effective-demand-equation.html

    Apparently using real GDI is better than real GDP for recession detection. One drawback is that you have to wait an extra month for the real GDI number release…

  6. RW says:

    Some infoporn for the day. Have no idea how useful the data might be but the regions formed by ‘cash flows’ form an interesting set of regional separations none-the less, pretty much ignoring political boundaries, red vs. blue, and so forth. The data source, http://www.wheresgeorge.com, is interesting too. (ht S. Roth

    A New Map Of The U.S., Created By How Our Dollar Bills Move

    Using a site that tracks dollar bills, a theoretical physicist noticed that our state boundaries are rather arbitrary, but that money tends to stay within new, more realistic boundaries.

  7. MikeNY says:

    Great post by AEP, and I suspect he may be right.

    The Fed’s sedulous serial bubble-blowing in defense of the status quo will fail, and when our politicians fear the people with their pitchforks, we will find the money to spend on infrastructure — that is, jobs. So what if the Fed prints that money? They want higher inflation. This is the course of least resistance.

  8. rd says:

    Interesting story about Hurrican Sandy recovery:

    http://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-news/overdue-insurance-reports-disp/9960222

    As a civil engineer, I will point out that forecasting storm surges in the NY-NJ area is exte\remely difficult with the large tidal estuaries and the islands of Manhattan and Long Island. These islands make for very complex tidal and storm surge interactions as we saw in Sandy. However, a basic rule of thumb is that most of coastal North America is prone to violent weather in most areas and tsunamis in a lot of other areas. So, in the end there are very few areas where you are safe from flooding if you live below an elevation of 15-20 feet below mean sea level.

  9. rct01 says:

    Screw the article saying higher taxes for high income earners. I like Hong Kong’s model capping income taxes at 25%. You shouldn’t have to pay more than that. That is ENOUGH.