My airplane reading for today:

• Dow Closes Above 15,000 (WSJ) but see also Dow’s hitting new highs — but are you? (MarketWatch)
• How To Invest, Think and Live Like Sir John Templeton (Forbes)
• Germans Splurge on Italian Homes Locals Can’t Afford (Bloombergsee also The German model is not for export (FT.com)
‘Cause these guys did so well spotting bubbles last time: Fed Council Warns of Credit Risk, Asset Price Bubble (Businessweek)
• Welcome to the post-BRIC world (Economist) see also No-one is impressed by China’s amazing April trade figures (FT Alphaville)
• Five Rich Men to Watch at Ira Sohn (WSJ)
• Funds See Opportunity in Real Estate (WSJ) but see Federal judge questions constitutionality of Colorado foreclosure law (Denver Post)
Going Public: Endowment performance at our great state universities (All About Alpha)
• Navy Ship Can’t Meet Mission, Internal U.S. Report Finds (Bloomberg)
• This Is the Most Detailed Picture of the Internet Ever (and Making it Was Very Illegal) (Motherboard)

What are you reading?

 

Americans’ Confidence in the Economy Ties Record High
Chart
Source: Gallup

Category: Financial Press

Please use the comments to demonstrate your own ignorance, unfamiliarity with empirical data and lack of respect for scientific knowledge. Be sure to create straw men and argue against things I have neither said nor implied. If you could repeat previously discredited memes or steer the conversation into irrelevant, off topic discussions, it would be appreciated. Lastly, kindly forgo all civility in your discourse . . . you are, after all, anonymous.

15 Responses to “10 Mid-Week AM Reads”

  1. hue says:

    China Cyberspies Outwit U.S. Stealing Military Secrets (Bloomberg)

    Bee Deaths May Have Reached Crisis Point for Crops (NPR)

    Decline of Bees Forces China Farmers to Hand Pollinate (China Dialogue)

    • ilsm says:

      The US would indeed be lucky if China ignores Sun Tzu and tilts in the US’ inane pursuit of expensive capacity to maintain an industry complex that don’t deliver.

      While China spends a little more than the US Department of Veterans Affarirs.

    • rd says:

      Honeybees are being trucked around the country and brought to massive fields to forage on a single crop. There has been lots of discussion about pesticides etc. causing colony collapse but there is also evidence that simple lack of diversity in their diet may reduce bees immune systems and make them less healthy:

      http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/8467746.stm

      Farming used to have smaller fields with hedge rows between them which would provide significant bio-diversity. Farmers would also have fallow fields that would have a diverse array of plants in them. Pollinators would have a very diverse flower population throughout the growing season to harvest as they went about their business. Hitting up the farmer’s crop was just part of the day’s work, but by no means all of it. Now, farms can have 10s of thousands of acres of a single crop so the only diversity a bee will see is the migration from farm to farm for different crops – so the bees will get the equivalent of a diet of only Cheerios for two weeks followed by only bananas for two more weeks etc.. we would quickly become unhealthy if this is how we ate.

      Interestingly, cities may be better bee habitats now than rural areas with industrialized farming because of the huge plant diversity in cities with all of the gardens:

      http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2005/11/1115_051115_bees.html
      http://news.discovery.com/animals/new-bee-species-111121.htm

  2. James Cameron says:

    “For the first time, the federal government will release the prices that hospitals charge for the 100 most common inpatient procedures. Until now, these charges have been closely held by facilities that see a competitive advantage in shielding their fees from competitors.”

    Medicare reveals hospitals’ prices for first time (WAPO)

    http://goo.gl/x65xO

  3. James Cameron says:

    > Navy Ship Can’t Meet Mission, Internal U.S. Report Finds (Bloomberg)

    “The Navy has 20 vessels under contract out of a planned fleet of 52. Construction costs have doubled to $440 million per ship from an original goal of $220 million.

    “LCS will stand up to the scrutiny,” Representative Jo Bonner, a Alabama Republican who represents Mobile where the Austal vessel is built, said today in an interview. “I welcome it.”

    Yeah, it sure looks like it . . . maybe this can double as a strategic bomber? . . . meanwhile, here are some of the issues Jo Bonner really cares about:

    * Cut spending—get the exploding deficit under control
    * Provide the tools to cut spending: e.g., the line item veto & balanced budget amendment
    * Force the Government to live within its means
    * Keep the Government small & accountable
    * Oppose tax increases

    http://goo.gl/Wpu4a (Jo Bonner, US Congress, Issues)

    • ilsm says:

      The LCS is solely to keep shipyards in business.

      It is a billion dollar PT baot, to shoot Japanese barges out of the waters around New Guinea.

      • ottnott says:

        This criticism of the LCS is unfounded. We can only hope that an increasing number of government agencies will match the Navy’s achievements in the vital area of running government like a business.

        The benefits of those achievements are clear:

        –Efficient use of labor for cost-competitive operation? Check.
        “Crew interviews confirmed fatigue levels setting in by the third day of normal LCS operations,” the report found. “The minimal-manning level and subsequent fatigue result in significant operational and safety impacts, with notable degradation of crew readiness, performance levels and quality of life.”

        –Cost-effective worker safety in place of nanny-state red-tape cocoons? Check.
        “The Navy has acknowledged that the vessels are being built to the service’s lowest level of survivability, a Pentagon-approved decision that sought to balance cost and performance. …The Littoral Combat Ship is “ill-suited for combat operations against anything but” small, fast boats not armed with anti-ship missiles, the Perez report found.” [I give this one bonus points for backwards compatibility with missions against Viking longboats.]

        –Providing customers with more choices, fewer commands? Check.
        “The confidential report found, though, that the 96-hour goal doesn’t represent the entire process of switching weapons modules. …One wargame demonstrated that “getting all of the right people and equipment on station to conduct the exchange could take several weeks,” according to the report, and that process “removed LCS from the tactical fight.””

        The resulting surge in economic activity is no surprise:
        “Construction costs have doubled to $440 million per ship from an original goal of $220 million.”

    • willid3 says:

      of course. as long as they can cut spending on people but increase spending corporations they are happy. and they can sell that spending on corporation as job creation. even though it does no such thing.
      what really create jobs is people spending money. but thats not who they really support. but as long as they cover that up with we did this to create jobs! they dont have to worry about it

  4. VennData says:

    Guys make plastic gun with 3D printing.

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/andygreenberg/2013/05/05/meet-the-liberator-test-firing-the-worlds-first-fully-3d-printed-gun/

    NRA doesn’t approve of this! Cuz it doesn’t put money into the pockets of the gun makers.

  5. rd says:

    “It is unfortunate that [Schneiderman] has chosen this route rather than engage in a constructive dialogue,” Wells Fargo added in its statement.

    This sounds like a line from the hostage-takers in the Die Hard movies. Reese Witherspoon should have used this line to get her husband out of the drunk driving charge instead of ranting on about standing on American soil..

    http://www.marketwatch.com/story/banks-still-have-trouble-getting-paperwork-right-2013-05-08?link=home_carousel

  6. That Gallup chart looks like more of that “invisible exuberance” that Barry doesn’t see on TV.

    Then again, that “record high” is only based on 5 years of data. 5 years ago this month, we were six months into a recession that “nobody” could see while it was happening (except for a few fine folks here and elsewhere), house prices were falling, and stocks were still down-and-out from the October 2007 peak. Yeah, compared to five years ago, things are maybe a bit better.

  7. VennData says:

    CNBC’s saying those tough Texan judges are going to cut Jeff Skilling’s sentence by ten years.

    Good Job Texas! Let those criminals go!

  8. DeDude says:

    AIRPLANE reading ????

    Uh-ohh – time to cover with some shorts (whatever it is you usually cover with shorts).