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via The Idea Farm

Category: Digital Media, Investing

Please use the comments to demonstrate your own ignorance, unfamiliarity with empirical data and lack of respect for scientific knowledge. Be sure to create straw men and argue against things I have neither said nor implied. If you could repeat previously discredited memes or steer the conversation into irrelevant, off topic discussions, it would be appreciated. Lastly, kindly forgo all civility in your discourse . . . you are, after all, anonymous.

7 Responses to “Global Cape: Europe Cheap, USA Dear”

  1. ZevCapital says:

    Wow, what a great view of the world. There are some strong geopolitical reasons to get long Greece, Argentina, Italy, Spain, and Portugal.
    If the US is going to be more active in pursuing bilateral relations with sovereign countries in the European periphery, Italy and Spain are looking like screaming buys. Might be the most difficult buy in history but the best trades always feel that way.
    Permabears can commence ad hominem attacks now.

  2. Chief Tomahawk says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aussie_Aussie_Aussie,_Oi_Oi_Oi

    Yeeessshhhhh!!!!!

    That Auzzie dollar/greenback cross in the last 3 months = not too ‘good’day’ mate.

  3. Triffy says:

    An unlabeled chart! I have no idea what it means.

  4. Iamthe50percent says:

    Now to demonstrate my complete ignorance as requested by our host:

    Based on gut alone, buy Italy. It’s a crazy place, but they always muddle through. I’d much rather invest in Italy than Russia for the same CAPE.

    And in Germany, where unions, management, and the government work together to keep the economy going. Compare that to here and ask why returns here are nearly half Germany’s. I’ve got my money where my mouth is with a large stake in Volkswagen. The dividend tax is a pain, though. They need a better tax treaty with the US to exempt IRA’s. Maybe they feel they have enough investment.

    • Alain says:

      At a quick glance Volkswagen is crazy cheap. Trading at a P/E of 3.5 and 12 month forward P/E of 6.5. Their peers such as Ford trade in the 10 to 12 range. Can’t see any reason in particular why the disconnect between the two.