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How’s Your MetaCognition?

Posted By Barry Ritholtz On August 16, 2013 @ 8:45 am In Philosophy,Psychology | Comments Disabled

 

“Knowing yourself is the beginning of all wisdom.”

-Aristotle

 

Over the past few weeks, I have been waxing eloquent on the subject of self-awareness, knowledge, and recognizing one’s own lackings thereto. Last week, we discussed the Value of Not Knowing [1]; that followed the prior week’s discussion of why I don’t bother guessing a monthly NFP number [2].

Today, I want to discuss Self-Enlightenment — why understanding yourself is so important to investors. This isn’t a Zen discussion of achieving a higher sense of oneness with the universe; rather, it is an explanation as to why knowing what it is you actually know, understanding what you don’t know, and having a high level of recognition of the danger when you think you know (but really don’t) is so crucial.

Those of you have seen our “Brain on Stocks [3]” presentations know that MetaCognition is an important part of understanding. You also know that a significant part of expertise is the intense understanding of one’s own skills and limitations. The other side of Dunning Kruger effect [4] — which we have discussed repeatedly — is that the amateur and the unskilled participant are stunningly unaware of their own inferior knowledge and skill set. They do not know what they do not know — often, fatally so.

So perhaps the best question we can ask of an investment manager (or an investor can ask themselves) is not “How Smart Are You?” Rather, it is “How’s your MetaCognition?” How self-enlightened are you? How well do you understand what you don’t know?”

From Socrates to Plato to Aristotle, metacognition was an important part of Greek philosophy. Socrates perhaps most famously declared “I only know that I know nothing;” He was perhaps the first human to wax eloquent on metacognition. It may be counter-intuitive, but understanding one’s own ignorance is the first step to attaining knowledge.

Perhaps Shakespeare put it best in As You Like It [5]: “The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man, knows himself to be a fool.”

How’s your metacognition?

 


Article printed from The Big Picture: http://www.ritholtz.com/blog

URL to article: http://www.ritholtz.com/blog/2013/08/hows-your-metacognition/

URLs in this post:

[1] Value of Not Knowing: http://www.ritholtz.com/blog/2013/08/on-the-value-of-not-knowing/

[2] guessing a monthly NFP number: http://www.ritholtz.com/blog/2013/08/whats-your-nfp-number-dont-have-one/

[3] Brain on Stocks: http://www.ritholtz.com/blog/?domains=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ritholtz.com%2F&sitesearch=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ritholtz.com%2F&cx=015905226837203657063%3Ax1cwdcykvvw&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&cof=FORID%3A11&s=Search&q=Brain+on+Stocks

[4] Dunning Kruger effect: http://www.ritholtz.com/blog/?domains=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ritholtz.com%2F&sitesearch=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ritholtz.com%2F&cx=015905226837203657063%3Ax1cwdcykvvw&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&cof=FORID%3A11&s=Search&q=Dunning+Kruger

[5] As You Like It: http://shakespeare.mit.edu/asyoulikeit/full.html

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