PJ-BP965A_WEATH_G_20130814193013

 

 

WSJ:

“The Weather Channel knows the chance for rain in St. Louis on Friday, what the heat index could reach in Santa Fe on Saturday and how humid Baltimore may get on Sunday.

It also knows when you’re most likely to buy bug spray.

The enterprise is transforming from a cable network viewers flip to during hurricane season into an operation that forecasts consumer behavior by analyzing when, where and how often people check the weather. Last fall the Weather Channel Cos. renamed itself the Weather Co. to reflect the growth of its digital-data business.

The Atlanta-based company has amassed more than 75 years’ worth of information: temperatures, dew points, cloud-cover percentages and much more, across North America and elsewhere.

The company supplies information for many major smartphone weather apps and has invested in data-crunching algorithms. It uses this analysis to appeal to advertisers who want to fine-tune their pitches to consumers.”

 

 

Source:
Weather Channel Now Also Forecasts What You’ll Buy
Company’s Data Helps Fine-Tune When and Where Advertisers Should Place Spots
KATHERINE ROSMAN
WSK, August 14, 2014  
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323639704579012674092402660.html

Category: Data Analysis, Science, Television

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4 Responses to “How the Weather Channel Forecasts What You’ll Buy”

  1. [...] when temperatures are above average. The original piece was in The Wall Street Journal, but this link with some details is available to [...]

  2. [...] when temperatures are above average. The original piece was in The Wall Street Journal, but this link with some details is available to [...]

  3. farmera1 says:

    Isn’t the mix of big data, consumerism, and retailing a wonderful thing. Can hardly wait to see the future.

    Trouble is the 1%ers will have trouble using all the beer unless they buy it to give to the average Joe sorta like giving bread to the Roman citizens.

  4. msnthrop says:

    This is great..the physical geography class I teach has a ton of business students this go around…I’ll add this map to my discussion of pressure systems in the atmosphere!