My end of week reading materials:

• Where should you put your money now? (CNN)
• Everything Is Amazing and Nobody Is Happy (Motley Fool) see also What a 241 year-old Dutch credit crisis tells us about market optimism (Quartz)
Shiller/Gundach: Two Bubble Hunters Size Up the World (Barron’s)
• Renminbi trade finance: less than meets the eye (FT.com) see also Euro displays uncommon strength (WSJ)
• Unemployment Won’t Hit 6.5% Until 2015, Fed Research Suggests (WSJ)
• On the World’s Roads, More American Wheels (NY Times) see also Would You Rather Have Brazil’s Economic Problems or America’s? (Harvard Business Review)
• 401(k)s tweak fees for investors. You may soon be paying more—or less. (WSJ)
• Long-term unemployment is still at its highest levels since World War II (Wonkblog) see also No, a $15-Hour Fast Food Wage Isn’t Crazy (Daily Beast)
• Sentient code: An inside look at Stephen Wolfram’s utterly new, insanely ambitious computational paradigm (Venture Beat)
• U.S. Military Lingo: The (Almost) Definitive Guide (NPR)

What are you reading?

 

U.S. Oil Prices Fall Sharply as Glut Forms on Gulf Coast

Source: WSJ

 

Category: Financial Press

Please use the comments to demonstrate your own ignorance, unfamiliarity with empirical data and lack of respect for scientific knowledge. Be sure to create straw men and argue against things I have neither said nor implied. If you could repeat previously discredited memes or steer the conversation into irrelevant, off topic discussions, it would be appreciated. Lastly, kindly forgo all civility in your discourse . . . you are, after all, anonymous.

7 Responses to “10 Friday AM Reads”

  1. hue says:

    America’s Internet Speeds Are Embarrassingly Slow (Minyanville)

    Why Is Google Buying So Many Robot Startups? (MIT Technology Review)

    This Bud’s for You: Establishing the Anheuser Busch of Marijuana (NYPo) Wake & Bake: It’s Hard to Quit the Dirt-Eating Habit (Alan Huffman: The Clarion-Ledger)

  2. willid3 says:

    3 stooges version of austerian economic theory?
    http://krugman.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/12/06/the-three-stooges-theory-of-fiscal-policy/?_r=0

    after beating my head against the wall, it feels a lot better when i stop doing that?

  3. VennData says:

    Obama lies again! These cannot be the real employment numbers!

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/07/business/economy/us-economy-adds-203000-jobs-as-unemployment-falls-to-5-year-low.html

    And more lies form this most scandal-plagued presidency EVER!

    http://news.yahoo.com/white-house-reverses-says-obama-met-uncle-lived-222107168.html

    – Jack Welch

  4. willid3 says:

    doesnt deregulation always lead to lower prices or so we are told. until it doesnt then we are told, um, no we really didnt mean that

    http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-lazarus-20131206,0,3897664,full.column#axzz2mi0fx9LR

  5. swag says:

    I enjoyed the CNN article “Where should you put your money now?” and I appreciate the recommendations.

    And I have a somewhat rude question for portfolio managers who steer their clients toward ETFs. Do you give your clients a management fee break to account for the expense ratio of the ETF (a built in management fee, if you will, of the ETF). The Vanguard ETFs in the article have pretty low expenses ratios, as do even the Spyder ETFs (looks like they’re catching up with the low expense crowd, finally), but stuff like DVYE that has an expense ratio of .49%, well that expense ratio lops off a healthy chunk of the 3.9% dividend yield, so I’m wondering how many basis points portfolio managers charge for “managing” that? Not that ETF selection or asset allocation aren’t important parts of what the PMs are doing, just that larding a portfolio with ETFs can add costs (hidden?) for the uninquisitive client.

    Thanks!