My afternoon train-reading:

• Hedge Funds Up 7.4% in 2013 to Trail S&P 500 for Fifth Year (Businessweek)
• The Science of Motivation: Your Brain on Dopamine (I Done This) see also This is your brain on religion: Uncovering the science of belief (Salon)
• REITs got trounced in 2013. Was the selloff overblown? (WSJ)
• Sen. Warren refuses to quit on banking oversight (Housing Wire) see also Elizabeth Warren, the antidote to CNBC (Columbia Journalism Review)
• How to give your kids everything but a sense of entitlement (Quartz)
• Charts: Income growth has stalled for most Americans (Mother Jones) see also  Economists agree: Raising the minimum wage reduces poverty (Washington Post)
• David Pogue: An Introduction To Yahoo Tech! (Yahoo)
• This Is The Internal Grading System Google Uses For Its Employees — And You Should Use It Too (Business Insider)
• Seven Movies That Changed People’s Politics, According to Science (Slate)
• Peter Gabriel: Friends Who Finally Scratch Back (WSJ)

What are you reading?

 

While the world is in a Heat Wave, America has a Polar Vortex

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Source: Amazing Maps

 

Category: Financial Press

Please use the comments to demonstrate your own ignorance, unfamiliarity with empirical data and lack of respect for scientific knowledge. Be sure to create straw men and argue against things I have neither said nor implied. If you could repeat previously discredited memes or steer the conversation into irrelevant, off topic discussions, it would be appreciated. Lastly, kindly forgo all civility in your discourse . . . you are, after all, anonymous.

7 Responses to “10 Midweek PM Reads”

  1. Bob is still unemployed   says:

    Do you know where your security risks really lie? Here’s another take on the topic.

    Senior managers are the worst information security offenders (net-security.org)

    “As companies look for solutions to protect the integrity of their networks, data centers, and computer systems, an unexpected threat is lurking under the surface—senior management.

    “According to a new survey, 87% of senior managers frequently or occasionally send work materials to a personal email or cloud account to work remotely, putting that information at a much higher risk of being breached.

    “Released by global investigations, intelligence, and risk services company Stroz Friedberg, the survey also found that 58% of senior management reported having accidentally sent the wrong person sensitive information, compared to just 25% of workers overall….”

  2. Roger Wicker is especially endearing because he opposed increasing the debt ceiling in January 2012. He also supported a balanced budget amendment, and wants to restore fiscal responsibility to “an out-of-control Congress requiring them to live under the same budget constraints as families and businesses.”

    Roger Wicker really rocks.

    “NASA will complete a $350 million tower to test rocket engines for a program that was canceled in 2010. The A-3 test stand will be finished early this year at Stennis Space Center in Mississippi. Its funding survived thanks to Senator Roger Wicker, a Republican from that state who supported the test stand’s completion even though NASA doesn’t need it.”

    NASA’s Defunct Project Survives on Mississippi Pork (Bloomberg)

    http://goo.gl/X0Defa

  3. pielou says:

    The polar vortex is just an invention from the lobby of the climate change denier.

    • RW says:

      Possibly this was an attempt at sarcasm and no note or indicator as such (nuance is difficult in a text-only medium) but, in any case …

      No.

      I first saw the term “polar vortex” referenced in climate models no later than the early 1980′s, often in connection with the prediction of more severe “cold snaps.” The term is actually quite old however, possibly first referenced in Littell’s Living Age No. 495, 12 November 1853, p. 430.

      Shorter version: “Polar Vortex” as a descriptive term for a specific environmental phenomenon was recognized at least 160 years ago.

    • rd says:

      This was an interesting article on the impact of dust from drought-stricken Southwest on the Colorado snow pack. Farming practices also apparently exacerbate dust generation.

      http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303640604579298572039061660

      Dust from the Sahara has also been found to be a major suppresent of Atlantic hurricane activity. Climate change has all sorts of very complex feedback mechanisms that either exacerbate problems or help suppress them. I don’t think the models are good enough to tease out the consequences yet of climate change due to these complex feedback mechanisms.

  4. rd says:

    Re: Economist agree minimum wage reduces poverty:

    Umm..not all
    http://www.marketwatch.com/story/the-war-on-poverty-kept-poor-people-poor-2014-01-08

    I agree with part of his first point that there are too many occupational licensures and his third point that the War on Drugs needs to end.

    However, his thesis that market forces were responsible for reducing poverty misses a couple of huge LBJ initiatives that helped drive those market forces. First, LBJ’s War on Poverty was mated at the hip with his concurrent Civil Rights Act. Opening up the regular economy to minorities and women was a huge factor in allowing “market forces” to reduce poverty. Many of the people who did not agree with the War on Pverty were also the people who did not believe in civil rights.

    The market forces would have likely kept minorities “in their place” and many women would not have entered the work force without the weight of the Civil Rights Act to crowbar the door to the market forces open. Second, things like the minimum wage allowed for guarantees that people would not be exploited mercillessly in the work place. Future follow-ups with OSHA etc. provided more security that they would not get seriously injured or killed on the job as well.

    LBJ’s expansion of Social Security has dramatically lowered elder poverty during a period of increasing longevity. Medicare has also provided healthcare security to the elderly.

    I have the utmost respect for LBJ’s domestic accomplishments. His decision not to run in 1968 because of the Vietnam War is one of the few times that a high-ranking politician has really put what he felt was the good of the country ahead of his own ambitions. Every other president in recent times has gone for re-election whenever eligible even if another person from his party may have been more appropriate at that time.