Good Wednesday morn . . . Some beach reading for you:

• Is shrinking stock market a bullish sign? (USA Today) see also Stocks are far less risky than you think (MarketWatch)
• The Best and Worst Thing About Investing (Reformed Broker)
• A Rational and Inefficient Noise Event (Political Calculations)
• Time to stop obsessing about central banks (FT Alphaville)
• What Lottery Winners and Tom Perkins Have in Common (Businessweek) see also Why You Are Spending More and Enjoying It Less (WSJ)
• Rodrik: Death by Finance (Project Syndicate)
• Statistical illusions (Columbia Journalism Review) see also Newspapers: still the most important medium for understanding the world (New Statesman)
• When You Fall in Love, This Is What Facebook Sees (The Atlantic)
• Spy Chief: We Should’ve Told You We Track Your Calls (Daily Beast)
• There Are Whales Alive Today Who Were Born Before Moby Dick Was Written (Smithsonian Magazine)

What are you reading?

 

 Gold Above Its 200 DMA

Source: Bespoke Investment Group

Category: Financial Press

Please use the comments to demonstrate your own ignorance, unfamiliarity with empirical data and lack of respect for scientific knowledge. Be sure to create straw men and argue against things I have neither said nor implied. If you could repeat previously discredited memes or steer the conversation into irrelevant, off topic discussions, it would be appreciated. Lastly, kindly forgo all civility in your discourse . . . you are, after all, anonymous.

17 Responses to “10 Mid-Week Reads”

  1. WickedGreen says:

    Hank the Crank was just on Doomberg arguing FOR the minimum wage hike proposed by President Obama!

    Because he just got back from Colorado, and he’s still high as a kite?

    Nay.

    Because it would stimulate the economy?

    Uh, no.

    Because 7 bucks an hour is a moral obscenity that virtually guarantees poverty, ill health, poor education, and a life of constant struggle?

    Natch.

    Because: Republicans are easily scapegoated and will suffer in the midterm elections if they don’t go along.

    It is my sincere and everlasting wish that Hank ends his days incoherently screaming his rotten lungs out at the minimum wage nurses assistant who wipes his mouth/keister just a little too caustically at the 1% Home for the Permanently Deranged.

  2. Bob is still unemployed   says:

    And the toll charges for using the Internet start to appear…

    Verizon wants Netflix to pay for traffic (theinquirer.net)

    “…INTERNET SERVICE PROVIDER (ISP) Verizon reportedly is throttling traffic to Netflix users.

    “As we previously reported, a number of the broadband provider’s customers have complained about ‘unwatchable’ buffering on the service since Verizon won a federal appellate court ruling allowing it to prioritise internet traffic….”

  3. VennData says:

    I wanna see the GOP asshats laugh at ‘Save the Whales’ on this one from the Smithsonian… All you care about are your tax cuts, screw double hulling the oil tankers, the Reagan mantra,

    Kill everything so you can drive your SUV GOPer.

  4. RW says:

    Not likely to happen and not likely to stop politicians interfering w/ businesses and business practices they don’t approve of either but it’s good to see the other knee jerk regardless; shows there’s still some reflex.

    VW workers may block southern U.S. deals if no unions: labor chief

    (Reuters) – Volkswagen’s top labor representative threatened on Wednesday to try to block further investments by the German carmaker in the southern United States if its workers there are not unionized.

    • willid3 says:

      but but didnt the GOP guarantee that there would be more jobs?????

      this just has to be caused by Obama!!!!

  5. romerjt says:

    Reading – The Second Machine Age good expl of inequality, . . . needs to be a bit “more for the masses” readable

  6. catman says:

    Beach reading? Funny, funny guy.

  7. rd says:

    re: Shrinking stock market

    The discussion appears to indicate that there is only the public stock market. The reality is that there is both a public and private stock market. Presumably the valuations of those cannot get too out of whack or the PE will IPO the privately held stock if public valuations are very high or would buy publicly held under-priced stock.

    In the end, the total value of the stock market, public and private, should be about the same whether or not it is totally public or totally private or a combination. Large insitutions like pension funds and universities would transfer much of their public stock money over to PE if they believed that PE was under-priced relative to the public market. Why would they want to hold public stock at 18x (as an example) if a PE firm was offering to let them in on a similar firm for 10x?

  8. rd says:

    Olympic medal inflation – where is Paul Volcker when you need him?

    http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-02-19/olympic-medal-inflation-triumph-at-the-winter-games-has-never-been-easier#r=hp-ls

    The inflation means that comparing total medals won by country over the history of the Olympics is virtually meaningless. However, I think in general the number of medals won by individual athletes is still largely relevant as most of the medal inflation has occurred by adding sports instead of more events per sport. They have been adding some team events that can up the potential medal count per athlete (team figure skating, sliding etc.) but that also means that the athletes need to participate in multiple events in a single Olympics to win those extra medals, no small feat for endurance sports like XC-skiing or violent sports like freestyle skiing and alpine where small amounts of exhaustion or injury can mean the difference between victory and defeat.

    Bjorndaehlen just became the most decorated Winter Olympian. He won an individual gold and a team gold to do it at age 40 while skiing, and not winning, some challenging races in between. Very impressive – not much evidence of grade inflation there.

  9. willid3 says:

    does a lie make you guilty of a crime?

    http://baselinescenario.com/2014/02/18/telling-a-lie-does-not-make-you-guilty-of-a-federal-crime/

    some times it does

    the real question is why do we allow sellers to lie to buyers? and why do buyers put up with it? maybe because the buyers dont really care about the lies?

  10. willid3 says:

    why we are doomed?

    http://www.businessinsider.com/robert-gordon-technology-paper-2014-2?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed:+TheMoneyGame+%28The+Money+Game%29

    i suspect its more because of the loss of income than any thing else

    but that been going on a lot longer that in this chart

  11. willid3 says:

    where the high speed internet will be? at lots lower prices too?

    http://googlefiberblog.blogspot.com/

  12. willid3 says:

    lets repeat the mortgage mess? with a new set of companies this time?
    http://qz.com/177915/youve-probably-never-heard-of-the-company-managing-your-home-loan/

  13. willid3 says:

    bell curve myth?
    http://qz.com/178396/the-bell-curve-is-a-myth/

    or the way companies tend to manage their employees?