From Bloomberg Visual Data:

Some 83 aircraft have been declared “missing” since 1948, according to data compiled by the Aviation Safety Network. The list includes planes capable of carrying more than 14 passengers and where no trace — bodies or debris — has ever been found.


Source: Bloomberg Visual Data

Category: Digital Media, Research

Please use the comments to demonstrate your own ignorance, unfamiliarity with empirical data and lack of respect for scientific knowledge. Be sure to create straw men and argue against things I have neither said nor implied. If you could repeat previously discredited memes or steer the conversation into irrelevant, off topic discussions, it would be appreciated. Lastly, kindly forgo all civility in your discourse . . . you are, after all, anonymous.

7 Responses to “Dozens of Planes Have Vanished in Post-WWII Era”

  1. Bob is still unemployed   says:

    Water is a phenomenal conductor of sound.

    I can’t help but wonder if any sensor networks designed to listen for submarines have picked up the sound of the jet hitting the water. I further wonder if such sounds were picked up, but cannot be made public due to a classified nature of the sensor arrays.

    • supercorm says:

      I’m pretty sure the NSA can spot any shutgun shot on this planet. Like you said, you just don’t want to reveal your capabilities to locate “non-important” people …

      … what was in this plane cargo anyway ?!

  2. rd says:

    It looks like the Bermuda Triangle is one of the safer places to fly planes,

  3. willid3 says:

    simple answer to where the plane is? all one would have to do to confirm or disprove is look right?

    http://www.wired.com/autopia/2014/03/mh370-electrical-fire/

  4. rfk says:

    If I had to place a bet, based upon what we know of the foot dragging, the head fakes and other misdirection of the Malaysians and the Chinese, the flight simulator, which in itself, be another head fake, …

    I would speculate that the Malaysia – Beijing route is one of the routes where gold is transported.