My afternoon train reading:

• A Pivotal Financial Crisis Case, Ending With a Whimper (DealBook)
• What Michael Lewis Gets Wrong About High-Frequency Trading (Businessweekand also 60 Minutes Sanitizes Its Report on High Frequency Trading (Wall Street On Parade)
• Gross Worst as Volatility Spikes in Fund: Riskless Return (Bloomberg)
• Silicon Valley Thinks You’re a Fool (Daily Beast) see also Google founders look to cement control with novel share split (FT)
• The Capex Comeback – Still Just Talk (Reformed Broker)
• Inequality is caused by ideology, not technology (John Quiggin)
• Here’s How Someone Else’s Debt Could Ruin Your Credit Rating (New Republic)
• How To Actually Save The Port Authority (Esquiresee also ‘Exhaustive’ Christie Report Omitted Port Authority (WNYC)
• Here’s What It’s Like To Live With The $316,000 Ferrari F12 Berlinetta (Business Insider)
• U.N. Climate Panel: “We’re Fucked. Hello? Is Anyone Listening? We. Are. Fucked.” (Rude Pundit)

What are you reading?

 

For Borrowers, Bonds Are Beautiful

Source: WSJ

 

Category: Financial Press

Please use the comments to demonstrate your own ignorance, unfamiliarity with empirical data and lack of respect for scientific knowledge. Be sure to create straw men and argue against things I have neither said nor implied. If you could repeat previously discredited memes or steer the conversation into irrelevant, off topic discussions, it would be appreciated. Lastly, kindly forgo all civility in your discourse . . . you are, after all, anonymous.

9 Responses to “10 MidWeek PM Reads”

  1. Concerned Neighbour says:

    Re: climate change, we are indeed quite rogered. We need a moonshot in new energy technologies, energy efficiency, and family planning to slow and eventually reverse population growth. Of course, none of those things will happen. Because freedom, oil, religion, and all that other good stuff.

  2. Apps Solidify Leadership Six Years into the Mobile Revolution (Flurry)

    http://goo.gl/szOi5w

  3. chartist says:

    I think Bill Gross profited most from the greatest bull bond bull market in history…Color me not impressed.

  4. rd says:

    I find this argument over ADP vs BLS jobs reports fascinating:

    http://www.businessinsider.com/adp-responds-to-criticism-of-payroll-report-2014-4

    I would think that one of the key questions would be whether or not the ADP reports could predict the BLS reports after they have been adjusted a couple of times. The inital BLS reports themselves seem to be fairly inaccurate, requiring frequent adjustments in later months. So why would the accuracy of predicting an inaccurate number be of great value to anybody other than an instantaneous trader?

    If the ADP reports could be shown to predict the final numbers after a couple of later adjustments, then that should be of great value to economists trying to ascertain the true state of the economy. However, nobody seems to be analyzing that.

    BTW – I just love some of the comments that jobs reports don’t really matter in an improving economy because it is a lagging indicator. It is always good to have confirmation that things did actually improve.

  5. DiggidyDan says:

    Wages vs. College Tuition costs. . . it is near impossible to “work your way through college” without relying on outside sources of cash (family, scholarships, or loans).

    http://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2014/04/the-myth-of-working-your-way-through-college/359735/

    It ain’t like it used to be folks. And even if you manage it, you will likely have a hard time finding a well paying job like there used to be waiting for most college grads.

  6. theexpertisin says:

    There is nothing like a stint in the military to fashion life skills our colleges and universities fail to teach. A measure if each is ideal. And the military will pay for your college education.

    Through direct observation, the folks who mock this approach are the ones who probably needed both “schools” the most.
    .

  7. bonalibro says:

    Does HFT fleece the little guy? It’s hard to say. It’s well known that the online discount brokers front run all their trades. That’s how they can afford to them for ten bucks each. If they are doing the front running, it stands to reason they aren’t going to let some other guy front run them first. But for big institutional stock flippers, yeah. You can bet these guys are getting fleeced. How could they not be? Should I care? Only in that I care that the whole system is rotten and needs to be restructured.