- The Big Picture - http://www.ritholtz.com/blog -

Rising Rates Unliklely to Kill This Bull Market

Posted By Barry Ritholtz On July 28, 2014 @ 9:30 am In Federal Reserve,Fixed Income/Interest Rates,Investing,Markets | 8 Comments

One of the oldest rules on Wall Street is, don’t fight the Fed. When the Federal Reserve is cutting rates, you want to be long equities, and when it is tightening, get out of the way. This has been a cause for concern since the Fed began talking of tapering its program of quantitative easing and ending its zero interest-rate policy.

But the knee-jerk response to an over-simplified rule of thumb might be wrong. When we look at the actual data — what happens to stocks when rates rise — we find a very different set of results than this heuristic suggests. Before I get to the numbers let’s look at both the positive and negative sides of increasing rates.

It is understandable that there is concern with a rising-rate environment. Often, higher rates signal an overheating economy, higher costs of credit to purchase goods and services and a potential profit squeeze as operating expenses rise. When the Fed is in its inflation-fighting mode, too much tightening will cause a recession.

However, there are also positives to increasing interest rates. Rates are merely the price of capital. Higher demand for capital means the economy is strengthening, as consumers borrow to spend on goods and to buy homes and companies seek to hire and do more investment spending. Higher rates also mean the risk of deflation is decreasing. Lastly, it reflects a normalization of Fed interventions, which today would suggest that the credit crisis is behind us.

Continues here [1]

 

 

 


Article printed from The Big Picture: http://www.ritholtz.com/blog

URL to article: http://www.ritholtz.com/blog/2014/07/rising-rates-unliklely-to-kill-this-bull-market/

URLs in this post:

[1] Continues here: http://www.bloombergview.com/articles/2014-07-28/the-threat-of-rising-rates

Copyright © 2008 The Big Picture. All rights reserved.