Posts filed under “Apprenticed Investor”

The Remarkable Life & Lessons of Ronald Read

 

 

My Sunday Washington Post Business Section column is out. This morning, we look at the remarkable life and lessons of Ronald Read. It is a fascinating tale.

Here’s an excerpt from the column:

“You may have read about the remarkable life and times of Ronald Read. He was the gas station attendant and lifelong resident of Windham County, Vt., who had quietly accumulated a portfolio worth a fortune. As theBrattleboro ­Reformer reported earlier this year, Read died last June at age 92. Despite his relatively modest wages, he left an estate with “stock holdings and property” valued at nearly $8 million. His bequest was to leave most of it to the Brattleboro Memorial Hospital and Brooks Memorial Library.

His close friends and family were shocked when they learned the value of his estate.

 There is wisdom to be learned from Read’s investing and life experiences. How a man of modest means accumulated so much wealth contains exemplary lessons for saving that apply to all of us. But there is also a cautionary tale about recognizing the value of your finite time here on earth. Perhaps learning to enjoy life while you can is part of that equation.”

The entire column contains lessons we can all learn from the remarkable Mr. Read.

 

Source:
The remarkable life and lessons of Ronald Read, the $8 million janitor
Barry Ritholtz
Washington Post, Todays April 26 2015
http://wapo.st/1z1VZj2

 

Category: Apprenticed Investor, Investing, Psychology

Protect Your Assets: Common-sense Cybersecurity for Investors

Let’s get the scary stuff out of the way upfront: Cybercrime costs the global economy $575 billion annually, according to reports. The United States takes a $100 billion hit, the largest of any country, according to Politico. A report from former U.S. intelligence officials counted 40 million people whose personal information was stolen within the past year.Online theft…Read More

Category: Apprenticed Investor, Investing, Web/Tech

Probability, Mean Reversion and Forecasting

We’re down to the Final Four in this year’s iteration of March Madness, also known as the national collegiate basketball tournament. Our earlier discussion of “The March Madness Theory of Investing“ didn’t sit well with some readers. The lessons we sussed out from the bracket-destroying results included home-country bias, how expert forecasts are about as good as those…Read More

Category: Apprenticed Investor, Bad Math, Psychology, Sports

Mesa Culpa: My 2014 Mistakes

Ritholtz: Admitting my 2014 mistakes Barry Ritholtz Washington Post, March 22, 2015   .   “Pain + Reflection  = Progress.” — Ray Dalio, founder of Bridgewater Associates 2014 is behind us, and before the first quarter sneaks by, I am obligated to offer my annual admissions of error. One of my biggest peeves about finance is…Read More

Category: Apprenticed Investor, Investing

What March Madness Can Teach US About Investing & Trading

We are down to the Sweet 16 in the NCAA’s men’s college basketball tournament, otherwise known as March Madness, which depending upon your perspective is either the most exciting month in sports or the American collegiate plantation system writ large. As is my wont, I seek out lessons in what I see, hunting for parallels in sports, politics, et…Read More

Category: Apprenticed Investor, Cognitive Foibles, Investing

My Mea Culpas from 2014

    > My Sunday Washington Post Business Section column is out. Its time for my annual mea culpas from last year. I like what the editors did with the print version headline: As neither of us is infallible, here are my mea culpas from 2014. Here’s an excerpt from the column:  I have been performing…Read More

Category: Apprenticed Investor, Investing

Three Commandments of Stock Valuation

Many metrics can be used to value markets. Which should you trust? Barry Ritholtz Washington Post, March 7 2015       “Faced with the choice between changing one’s mind and proving that there is no need to do so, almost everyone gets busy on the proof.” — John Kenneth Galbraith Let’s take a look…Read More

Category: Apprenticed Investor, Investing, Valuation

Are Stocks Cheap or Expensive? How to Tell

>   This morning in my Sunday Washington Post Business Section column, we look at the issue of how expensive U.S. stocks are. There are several ways to determine this, fraught with the potential for error. If you want to determine how cheap or expensive the stock market is,  I suggest three commandments to consider: ●Thou shalt…Read More

Category: Apprenticed Investor, Investing, Valuation

Be Like Warren Buffett? No . . . Be Like You

Much of the financial world is all abuzz over the 50th annual letter to shareholders of Berkshire Hathaway, released this past weekend.Financial journalists, amateur Buffett sleuths, Graham & Dodd aficionados and just about everyone I know spent some quality time this weekend with this letter. They are all trying to identify that one pearl of wisdom that…Read More

Category: Apprenticed Investor, Investing

What do falling oil prices mean for the U.S. in the short and long term Barry Ritholtz Washington Post, February 14 2015       Since early 2014, the price of oil has plummeted. It peaked last year at $105 a barrel and is now about $50.The consumption and production of energy is a major…Read More

Category: Apprenticed Investor, Economy, Energy