Posts filed under “Apprenticed Investor”

Paul Tudor Jones: 13 Insights

I love this collection of Paul Tudor Jones insights and rules by way of Ivanhoff Capital:

 

13 Insights From Paul Tudor Jones

1. Markets have consistently experienced “100-year events” every five years. While I spend a significant amount of my time on analytics and collecting fundamental information, at the end of the day, I am a slave to the tape (and proud of it).

2. Younger generation are hampered by the need to understand (and rationalize) why something should go up or down. By the time that it becomes self-evident, the move is over.

3. When I got into the business, there was so little information on fundamentals, and what little information one could get was largely imperfect. We learned just to go with the chart. (Why work when Mr. Market can do it for you?)

4. There are many more deep intellectuals in the business today. That, plus the explosion of information on the Internet, creates an illusion that there is an explanation for everything. Hence, the thinking goes, your primary task is to find that explanation.

As a result of this poor approach, technical analysis is at the bottom of the study list for many of the younger generation, particularly since the skill often requires them to close their eyes and trust price action. The pain of gain is just too overwhelming to bear.

5. There is no training — classroom or otherwise — that can prepare for trading the last third of a move, whether it’s the end of a bull market or the end of a bear market. There’s typically no logic to it; irrationality reigns supreme, and no class can teach what to do during that brief, volatile reign. The only way to learn how to trade during that last, exquisite third of a move is to do it, or, more precisely, live it.

6. Fundamentals might be good for the first third or first 50 or 60 percent of a move, but the last third of a great bull market is typically a blow-off, whereas the mania runs wild and prices go parabolic.

7. That cotton trade was almost the deal breaker for me. It was at that point that I said, ‘Mr. Stupid, why risk everything on one trade? Why not make your life a pursuit of happiness rather than pain?’

8. If I have positions going against me, I get right out; if they are going for me, I keep them… Risk control is the most important thing in trading. If you have a losing position that is making you uncomfortable, the solution is very simple: Get out, because you can always get back in.

9. Losers average down losers

10. The concept of paying one-hundred-and-something times earnings for any company for me is just anathema. Having said that, at the end of the day, your job is to buy what goes up and to sell what goes down so really who gives a damn about PE’s?

11. The normal progression of most traders that I’ve seen is that the older they get something happens. Sometimes they get more successful and therefore they take less risk. That’s something that as a company we literally sit and work with. That’s certainly something that I’ve had to come to grips with in particular over the past 12 to 18 months. You have to actively manage against your natural tendency to become more conservative. You do that because all of a sudden you become successful and don’t want to lose what you have and/or in my case you get married and have children and naturally, consciously or subconsciously, you become more conservative.

12. I look for opportunities with tremendously skewed reward-risk opportunities. Don’t ever let them get into your pocket – that means there’s no reason to leverage substantially. There’s no reason to take substantial amounts of financial risk ever, because you should always be able to find something where you can skew the reward risk relationship so greatly in your favor that you can take a variety of small investments with great reward risk opportunities that should give you minimum draw down pain and maximum upside opportunities.

13. I believe the very best money is made at the market turns. Everyone says you get killed trying to pick tops and bottoms and you make all your money by playing the trend in the middle. Well for twelve years I have been missing the meat in the middle but I have made a lot of money at tops and bottoms.

 

Great stuff, Ivan !

Category: Apprenticed Investor, Investing, Rules

The Remarkable Life and Investing Lessons of Ronald Read

The remarkable life and lessons of Ronald Read, the $8 million janitor Barry Ritholtz Washington Post, April 26 2015       You may have read about the remarkable life and times of Ronald Read. He was the gas station attendant and lifelong resident of Windham County, Vt., who had quietly accumulated a portfolio worth…Read More

Category: Apprenticed Investor, Investing

The Remarkable Life & Lessons of Ronald Read

    My Sunday Washington Post Business Section column is out. This morning, we look at the remarkable life and lessons of Ronald Read. It is a fascinating tale. Here’s an excerpt from the column: “You may have read about the remarkable life and times of Ronald Read. He was the gas station attendant and…Read More

Category: Apprenticed Investor, Investing, Psychology

Protect Your Assets: Common-sense Cybersecurity for Investors

Let’s get the scary stuff out of the way upfront: Cybercrime costs the global economy $575 billion annually, according to reports. The United States takes a $100 billion hit, the largest of any country, according to Politico. A report from former U.S. intelligence officials counted 40 million people whose personal information was stolen within the past year.Online theft…Read More

Category: Apprenticed Investor, Investing, Web/Tech

Probability, Mean Reversion and Forecasting

We’re down to the Final Four in this year’s iteration of March Madness, also known as the national collegiate basketball tournament. Our earlier discussion of “The March Madness Theory of Investing“ didn’t sit well with some readers. The lessons we sussed out from the bracket-destroying results included home-country bias, how expert forecasts are about as good as those…Read More

Category: Apprenticed Investor, Bad Math, Psychology, Sports

Mesa Culpa: My 2014 Mistakes

Ritholtz: Admitting my 2014 mistakes Barry Ritholtz Washington Post, March 22, 2015   .   “Pain + Reflection  = Progress.” — Ray Dalio, founder of Bridgewater Associates 2014 is behind us, and before the first quarter sneaks by, I am obligated to offer my annual admissions of error. One of my biggest peeves about finance is…Read More

Category: Apprenticed Investor, Investing

What March Madness Can Teach US About Investing & Trading

We are down to the Sweet 16 in the NCAA’s men’s college basketball tournament, otherwise known as March Madness, which depending upon your perspective is either the most exciting month in sports or the American collegiate plantation system writ large. As is my wont, I seek out lessons in what I see, hunting for parallels in sports, politics, et…Read More

Category: Apprenticed Investor, Cognitive Foibles, Investing

My Mea Culpas from 2014

    > My Sunday Washington Post Business Section column is out. Its time for my annual mea culpas from last year. I like what the editors did with the print version headline: As neither of us is infallible, here are my mea culpas from 2014. Here’s an excerpt from the column:  I have been performing…Read More

Category: Apprenticed Investor, Investing

Three Commandments of Stock Valuation

Many metrics can be used to value markets. Which should you trust? Barry Ritholtz Washington Post, March 7 2015       “Faced with the choice between changing one’s mind and proving that there is no need to do so, almost everyone gets busy on the proof.” — John Kenneth Galbraith Let’s take a look…Read More

Category: Apprenticed Investor, Investing, Valuation

Are Stocks Cheap or Expensive? How to Tell

>   This morning in my Sunday Washington Post Business Section column, we look at the issue of how expensive U.S. stocks are. There are several ways to determine this, fraught with the potential for error. If you want to determine how cheap or expensive the stock market is,  I suggest three commandments to consider: ●Thou shalt…Read More

Category: Apprenticed Investor, Investing, Valuation