Posts filed under “Apprenticed Investor”

Questions For Your Financial Advisor

A good list for those of you who delegate your investing to an outside adviser.

Consider asking these questions of your advisor during your quarterly and/or 2008 year-end review:

1. What were your adviser’s expectations for the stock market’s returns in 2008 and how did these expectations compare to the actual results?

2. How did your investment performance compare to that of the major indices? In what areas did you outperform, and in what areas did you underperform — and why?

3. What was your adviser’s economic and credit expectations, and how did these expectations compare to the actual events? Where and why were his assumptions wrong?

4. Did your adviser change his strategy as economic and financial events changed? If he didn’t, why not?

5. Did you experience outsized individual stock or large specific industry or sector share price losses? Did your adviser institute a discipline to stop losses, or were your losses allowed to compound? Did your adviser "double down" on poor investments?

6. Ask your adviser whether he "eats is own cooking" — that is, did he invest along with you in the same investments, and are both of your interests aligned?

Hat tip: Doug Kass

Category: Apprenticed Investor, Trading

Lose the Wall Street Research MSMedia Blogs

Category: Apprenticed Investor, Financial Press, Psychology, Weblogs

Bob Farrell’s 10 Rules for Investing

Category: Apprenticed Investor, Contrary Indicators, Investing, Markets, Psychology, Short Selling, Trading

Is the Market Still a Future Indicator?

Category: Apprenticed Investor, Hedge Funds, Markets, Trading, Valuation

Lessons Learned From A Dangerous Year

Category: Apprenticed Investor, Economy, Markets, Trading

Seven Stock Blunders

Category: Apprenticed Investor, Investing, Trading

Rules for Living from Nassim Taleb

The Author of Fooled by Randomness and The Black Swan has some suggestions for you:

Taleb’s top life tips

1. Scepticism is effortful and costly. It is better to be sceptical about matters of large consequences, and be imperfect, foolish and human in the small and the aesthetic.

2. Go to parties. You can’t even start to know what you may find on the envelope of serendipity. If you suffer from agoraphobia, send colleagues.

3. It’s not a good idea to take a forecast from someone wearing a tie. If possible, tease people who take themselves and their knowledge too seriously.

4. Wear your best for your execution and stand dignified. Your last recourse against randomness is how you act — if you can’t control outcomes, you can control the elegance of your behaviour. You will always have the last word.

5. Don’t disturb complicated systems that have been around for a very long time. We don’t understand their logic. Don’t pollute the planet. Leave it the way we found it, regardless of scientific ‘evidence’.

6. Learn to fail with pride — and do so fast and cleanly. Maximise trial and error — by mastering the error part.

7. Avoid losers. If you hear someone use the words ‘impossible’, ‘never’, ‘too difficult’ too often, drop him or her from your social network. Never take ‘no’ for an answer (conversely, take most ‘yeses’ as ‘most probably’).

8. Don’t read newspapers for the news (just for the gossip and, of course, profiles of authors). The best filter to know if the news matters is if you hear it in cafes, restaurants… or (again) parties.

9. Hard work will get you a professorship or a BMW. You need both work and luck for a Booker, a Nobel or a private jet.

10. Answer e-mails from junior people before more senior ones. Junior people have further to go and tend to remember who slighted them.

click for video

Nassim_taleb

Source:
Nassim Nicholas Taleb: the prophet of boom and doom
Bryan Appleyard
The Sunday Times, June 1, 2008
http://business.timesonline.co.uk/tol/business/economics/article4022091.ece

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Category: Apprenticed Investor, Books, Investing, Video

The Psychology of Selling

Category: Apprenticed Investor, Markets, Psychology, Real Estate, Trading

It’s a Great Time to Be an Investor !

Category: Apprenticed Investor, Investing, Markets, Psychology, Trading

Why Does -20% = Bear Market?

Category: Apprenticed Investor, Financial Press, Markets, Technical Analysis