Posts filed under “Bailouts”

His Name is Mudd

"In 2006 and early 2007, the industry, many analysts and market observers were generally not predicting a downturn in the housing and credit markets to the magnitude of what has since emerged, and outlooks for particular market segments at that time varied significantly."

-Fannie Mae chief Daniel H. Mudd

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That is the excuse given by Fannie Mae CEO Daniel Mudd as to why the GSE bought into so much ruinous paper (and at the peak of the market to boot).

One would imagine that the people running the biggest purchaser of mortgages in the world would have their own independent expert view, would understand housing, and might be familiar with the real estate cycles in the United States.   

One would be wrong.

I find it amusing that some lying liars argue that the Fannie Mae (FNM) and Freddie Mac (FRE) were "forced" to purchase sketchy mortgages by some government HUD or CRA mandate. As the Washington Post reveals, that turns out to be completely false.
Rather, it was a mad grab for growth that sent Fannie into the arms of
the most risky mortgages.

Fannie was supposed to be buying mortgages and then securitizing them itself. Instead, Fannie Mae thought itself a large hedge fund, and was investing in RMBS and derivatives packaged by others. According to regulatory data, as far back as 2002, Fannie Mae had invested in "tens of billions of dollars of such securities."

The risk reach by Fannie is detailed in a number of the internal Fannie memos that describes this as part of their growth oriented business model:

In January 2007, as years of loose mortgage lending were about to send the nation’s housing market into devastating decline, Fannie Mae chief executive Daniel H. Mudd wrote a confidential memo to his board.

Discussing the company’s successes, Mudd said one of Fannie Mae’s achievements in 2006 was expanding its involvement in the market for subprime and other nontraditional mortgages. He called it a step "toward optimizing our business."

A month later, Fannie Mae outlined plans to further expand its activities in the subprime market. The company recognized the already weak performance of subprime loans but predicted that they would get better in 2007, according to another Fannie Mae document.

Internal documents show that even late in the housing bubble, Fannie Mae was drawn to risky loans by a variety of temptations, including the desire to increase its market share and fulfill government quotas for the support of low-income borrowers.

One last factor: WaPo adds that during the housing boom years, Fannie was "distracted by an accounting scandal and its fallout. For much of 2006, the company was focused on a continuing effort to correct years of false financial reports, a massive project that cost more than $1 billion and ultimately revealed that Fannie Mae had overstated past profits by $6.3 billion."

I didn’t think companies could overstate REVENUES by more than six billion dollars, and these clowns were overstating profits by that amount. (Why aren’t a lot of people in jail over this?)

There’s more at WaPo…

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Previously:
William Ackman on Fannie & Freddie (July 2008)
http://bigpicture.typepad.com/comments/2008/07/william-ackman.html

Even More Writedowns Coming  (July 2008)

http://bigpicture.typepad.com/comments/2008/07/ofheo-more-writ.html

Source:
Fannie’s Perilous Pursuit of Subprime Loans
David S. Hilzenrath
Washington Post, August 19, 2008; Page D01
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/08/18/AR2008081802111.html

Category: Bailouts, Corporate Management, Credit, Legal, Real Estate, Valuation

Category: Bailouts, Credit, Taxes and Policy

Bernanke Bailout

Category: Bailouts, Economy

China’s View of US SubPrime Issues

Category: Bailouts, Credit, Derivatives, Economy, Real Estate

Fannie & Freddie & Peter Pan Paulson

Category: Bailouts, Corporate Management, Credit, Real Estate

Protest at the Fed

While we are sitting around waiting for the widely anticipated stand pat 2:15 FOMC Fed statement, here are some interesting photos of a protest at last months meeting:

Discount_capitol

Peso

Socialism_wall_street

Full set of photos here

Hat tip: Cunning Realist

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Read More

Category: Bailouts, Federal Reserve, Psychology

Poole: Save Fannie/Freddie, Then Dismantle Them

Category: Bailouts, Credit, Derivatives, Federal Reserve

Quote of the Day: Rampant Capitalism ?

Category: Bailouts, Credit, Financial Press

Moral Hazard ?

Category: Bailouts

Pimco’s Gross: Fannie, Freddie Mortgages ‘Excellent’

Let’s call this a bit of counter programming to all of our negative coverage of Fannie Mae (FNM) and Freddie Mac (FRE):

Bill Gross, who manages the world’s biggest bond fund, said it’s not possible for government sponsored mortgage-finance companies Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to raise capital without the Treasury Department’s support.

"Let’s be blunt: to the extent the Treasury suggests they’ll never have to use their authority, that’s a sham,” said Gross of Pacific Investment Management Co. "It’s fallacious to suggest that the agencies could issue capital, preferred stock, without the co-participation of the Treasury. I don’t think that’s possible.”

Freddie Mac said on July 18 that it intends to proceed with a $5.5 billion capital-raising plan it announced in May that will include both common and preferred securities. Pimco wouldn’t buy the companies’ stock without the Treasury’s involvement, Gross said, in a Bloomberg Television interview from the firm’s headquarters in Newport Beach, California.

Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson is pushing Congress to authorize the Treasury to purchase equity stakes in Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and expand government-backed credit lines to them amid concern that they don’t have enough capital to weather the worst housing slump since the Great Depression. Freddie Mac shares have tumbled 74 percent this year and Fannie Mae has dropped 65 percent. The companies make money by guaranteeing mortgage-backed securities they create out of loans bought from lenders and sell to investors worldwide.

Mortgage-backed bonds issued by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are “an excellent buy” compared with debt of the agencies, Gross said.

Bill Gross, who manages the world’s biggest bond fund at Pacific
Investment Management Co., talks about Treasury Secretary Henry
Paulson’s plan to rescue Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the outlook for
U.S. home prices, Federal Reserve monetary policy and the bond market.

click for video
Gross_on_fannie

00:00 Passage of GSE rescue plan is "critical."
01:03 Recapitalization of Fannie and Freddie
01:49 Fannie and Freddie mortgages are "excellent."
02:55 Government’s GSE model "has to be amended."
03:54 Outlook for the U.S. housing market, prices
04:58 Capital-raising efforts by Fannie and Freddie
06:00 Rate hikes by Fed would be "wrong approach."
07:17 Treasuries and TIPS; measures of inflation
09:23 Relationship of credit turmoil, home prices
10:36 Investment in bank debt; U.S. dollar value
12:53 "Inappropriately" valued U.S. Treasuries

Source:
Pimco’s Gross Says Fannie, Freddie Need Treasury
Kathleen Hays and Sandra Hernandez
Bloomberg, July 21 2008
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&sid=aeycKikYswvw

Category: Bailouts, Credit, Video