Posts filed under “Books”

Books Bought By Big Picture Readers (July 2013)

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Once again, its time to peruse the data to see which books TBP readers bought last month. Amazon’s embed code lets me track every click from these links — how many people look at the page, how many books get seen, and/or collectively purchased.

Its anonymous — I don’t know who bought what — but there’s lots of data on the various books generated.

These were the most popular TBP books for July:

Choose Yourself! (James Altucher)
Bailout Nation (Barry Ritholtz)
Coaching Questions: A Coach’s Guide to Powerful Asking Skills (Tony Stoltzfus)
Thinking, Fast and Slow (Daniel Kahneman)
Adapt: Why Success Always Starts with Failure (Tim Harford)
The Creature from Jekyll Island (G. Edward Griffin)
Poor Charlie’s Almanack (Charles T. Munger)
Hedge Hogs (Barbara T. Dreyfuss)
New Ideas from Dead Economists (Todd G. Buchholz)

Kindle and eBooks after the jump

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Choose Yourself! (James Altucher)
Thinking, Fast and Slow (Daniel Kahneman)
Adapt: Why Success Always Starts with Failure (Tim Harford)
Bailout Nation (Barry Ritholtz)
The Paradox of Choice (Barry Schwartz)

Category: Books, Consumer Spending

The Best (Non-Financial) Financial Books

From time to time people ask me to give them recommendations on good finance books. When I respond, I either get blank stares or laughs… What’s so funny about the Tao Te Ching, Thoreau’s Walden, or Daniel Gilbert’s Stumbling On Happiness? Were they expecting something like Dave Ramsey’s Financial Peace, Kiyosaki’s Poor Dad / Rich…Read More

Category: Books, Philosophy

Books Bought By Big Picture Readers (June 2013)

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Chart

 

Once again, its time to peruse the data to see which books TBP readers bought last month. Amazon’s embed code lets me track every click from these links — how many people look at the page, how many books get seen, and/or collectively purchased.

Its anonymous — I don’t know who bought what — but there’s lots of data on the various books generated.

These were the most popular TBP books for June:

Choose Yourself! (James Altucher)
Bailout Nation (Barry Ritholtz)
Coaching Questions: A Coach’s Guide to Powerful Asking Skills (Tony Stoltzfus)
Life Coaching Activities and Powerful Questions: A Life Coaching Activities Workbook! (Phyllis E Reardon)
Philosophy: Who Needs It (Ayn Rand)
The Creature from Jekyll Island: A Second Look at the Federal Reserve (G. Edward Griffin)
The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less (Barry Schwartz)
Thinking, Fast and Slow (Daniel Kahneman)
Poor Charlie’s Almanack (Peter D. Kaufman)

 

Kindle and eBooks after the jump

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Category: Books

Choose Yourself by James Altucher

Choose Yourself by James Altucher The world is changing. Markets have crashed. Jobs have disappeared. Industries have been disrupted and are being remade before our eyes. Everything we aspired to for “security,” everything we thought was “safe,” no longer is: College. Employment. Retirement. Government. It’s all crumbling down. In every part of society, the middlemen…Read More

Category: Books

The Paradox of Choice

9780060005696

I discovered The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less, through a TED talk (after the jump) — I haven’t read it yet, but it looks quite interesting.

Reviews:

“In this revolutionary and beautifully reasoned book, Barry Schwartz shows that there is vastly too much choice in the modern world. This promiscuous amount of choice renders the consumer helpless and dissatisfied. The Paradox of Choice is a must read for every thoughtful person.”
— Martin Seligman, author of Learned Optimism and Authentic Happiness

“The Paradox of Choice carries a simple yet profoundly life-altering message for all Americans. Based on new research, Barry Schwartz explores why we want more choices when the best possible choice is already at hand, and how the creation of this “choice overload” undermines good decision-making. His eleven practical, simple steps to becoming less choosy will change much in your daily life. Buy this book now!”
— Philip G. Zimbardo, author of Shyness: What It Is, What to Do About It

“Today’s world offers us more choices but, ironically, less satisfaction. In this provocative and riveting book, Barry Schwartz shines the light of psychological science on popular culture and shows us steps we can take toward a more rewarding life. This is one of those rare books I just couldn’t put down.”
— David G. Myers, author of Intuition: Its Powers and Perils

 

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Category: Books, Psychology

Books Bought By Big Picture Readers (April 2013)

Click to enlarge
Chart

Once again, its time to peruse the data to see which books TBP readers bought last month. Amazon’s embed code lets me track every click from these links — how many people look at the page, how many books get seen, and/or collectively purchased.

Its anonymous — I don’t know who bought what — but there’s lots of data on the various books generated.

These were the most popular TBP books for April:

In The Plex: How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives (Steven Levy)
The Triumph of Contrarian Investing (Ned Davis)
Bailout Nation (Barry Ritholtz)
Being Right or Making Money (Ned Davis)
Contagious (Jonah Berger)
The Bankers’ New Clothes (Anat Admati)
Wait: The Art and Science of Delay (Frank Partnoy)
How We Know What Isn’t So (Thomas Gilovich)
Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion (Robert B. Cialdini)
Markets in Motion (Ned Davis)
Thinking, Fast and Slow (Daniel Kahneman)
Big Data (Viktor Mayer-Schonberger, Viktor Mayer-Schonberger)
Poor Charlie’s Almanack (Charles T. Munger)
The battle for stock market profits (Gerald M Loeb)

 

Kindle and eBooks after the jump

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Category: Books

I had a chance at a recent Wired event to chat with Steven Levy about In The Plex which I enjoyed greatly. It is a fun, fascinating read about how a great innovation in search and a second innovation — monetizing it — led to creation, development, and dominance of Google.

In The Plex: How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives

Levy, who had done a few way early and quite complementary articles on Google (before anyone knew who they were) was granted “unprecedented access to the company” and it shows in his quite revelatory book about how how Google became the company it is today.

The key to Google’s success in all of their businesses, according to Levy, is the engineering mind-set and adoption of such Internet values as speed, openness, experimentation, and risk taking.

I was tempted to accuse Levy of fawning over the company, but he is pretty brutal on how Google stumbled so badly in China as well as in social networking,

He writes with a deep understanding of engineering and software — which works terrifically well in this book. That technology savvy is what was noticeably missing from Walter Isaacson’s biography of Steve Jobs.

If you are curious as to how things operate in the Googleplex, this books gives you the details.

 

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Category: Books, Web/Tech

Books Bought By Big Picture Readers (March 2013)

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Once again, its time to peruse the data to see which books TBP readers bought last month via Amazon’s magic embed code (we can track click from these links).  Its anonymous — I don’t know who bought what — but there’s lots of data on the various books generated.

These were the most popular TBP books for March:

Contagious (Jonah Berger)
Poor Charlie’s Almanack: The Wit and Wisdom of Charles T. Munger (Charles T. Munger)
Big Data (Viktor Mayer-Schonberger)
How We Know What Isn’t So (Thomas Gilovich)
Bailout Nation (Barry Ritholtz)
The Myth of the Rational Market (Justin Fox)
Thinking, Fast and Slow (Daniel Kahneman)
• Wait: The Art and Science of Delay (Frank Partnoy)
• Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion (Robert B. Cialdini)
Pound Foolish (Helaine Olen)
The Bankers’ New Clothes (Anat Admati)

Kindle and eBooks after the jump

 

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Category: Books

Books Everyone Should Read

Click to enlarge Source: Information is Beautiful

Category: Books, Digital Media

The Bankers’ New Clothes

The Bankers’ New Clothes: What’s Wrong with Banking and What to Do about It

This book is next up in my queue. It looks to be a primer on why big, highly leveraged banks are bad for the economy.

The reviews are outstanding; full chapter 9 after the jump. The book’s site is here; Amazon page here.

 

Reviews:

More than four years after the financial meltdown devastated the economy, our banking system remains resistant to reform and riddled with risk. The Bankers’ New Clothes challenges us to question the status quo and to think anew about the transformative changes in banking that are needed to serve the public interest. This work should spur a long-overdue debate on real banking reform.”

-Phil Angelides, chairman of the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission

The Bankers’ New Clothes underscores that there is perhaps no reform more important and central to a stable financial system than capping the ability of financial institutions to take excessive risks using other people’s money.

-Sheila C. Bair, former chair of FDIC and author of Bull by the Horns

The Bankers’ New Clothes accomplishes the near impossible by translating the arcane world of banking regulation into plain English. In doing so, it exposes as false the self-serving arguments against meaningful financial reform advanced by Wall Street executives and the captured politicians who serve their interests. This revelatory must-read shreds bankers’ scare tactics while offering commonsense reforms that would protect the general public from unending cycles of boom, bust, and bailout.

-Neil Barofsky, author of Bailout

Bankers have sold us a story that their risky practices are the necessary cost of a dynamic system. Admati and Hellwig expose this as a misguided and dangerous lie, and show how banks can be made more stable–if less profitable for the bankers themselves–without sacrificing economic growth. This brilliant book demystifies banking for everyone and explains what is really going on. Investors, policymakers, and all citizens owe it to themselves to listen.

-Simon Johnson, coauthor of 13 Bankers

A clearheaded antidote to the ill-advised snap reactions to the financial crisis, The Bankers’ New Clothes carefully counteracts arguments that the banking system is now more secure. With direct and rigorous analysis, Admati and Hellwig lay bare the ongoing misinformation about modern banks, and show what remains wrong with banking. This book is the voice shouting that the bankers are still not wearing any clothes. We should listen.

-Frank Partnoy, author of Infectious Greed

I like this book. The Bankers’ New Clothes explains in plain language why banking reform is still incomplete, contrary to what lobbyists, politicians, and even some regulators tell us.

-Paul Volcker, former chairman of the U.S. Federal Reserve and the U.S. Economic Recovery Advisory Board

 

Full chapter after the jump . . .

 

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Category: Bailouts, Books, Crony Capitalists