Posts filed under “Cognitive Foibles”

College: The Great Unleveler


Source: Opinionator

Category: Cognitive Foibles

AAII Presentation: Brain on Stocks

The ongoing battle between you and that large, mostly under-utilized slab of grey matter resting atop your spinal cord, doing very little of anything (except keeping you alive…)   AAII Brain on Stocks Presentsation NYC 2014   Downlaod: AAII NYC 2014  

Category: Cognitive Foibles, Psychology

How Is Your Brain Interfering With Your Investing?

I am the guest speaker tonight at AAII’s NYC meeting in midtown. The subject: Why your brain is the source of nearly all of your investing errors, and what you can do about it. (Details here).   Click for more details   Should be fun!

Category: Cognitive Foibles, Investing, Psychology

What I learned after 30,000 posts . . .

After 30,000 posts, Big Picture blogger has figured a few things out Barry Ritholtz Washington Post, September 19, 2014     Sometime last week, I published my 30,000th blog post. This was no small accomplishment — I started the Big Picture blog back in 2003. Since then, I have published a stream of charts, investing…Read More

Category: Apprenticed Investor, Cognitive Foibles, Weblogs

Mauboussin: Untangling Skill and Luck

Michael Mauboussin is our Masters in Business interview this weekend.

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What role, exactly, do skill and luck play in our successes and failures? Some games, like roulette and the lottery, are pure luck. Others, like chess, exist at the other end of the spectrum, relying almost wholly on players’ skill.

In his provocative book, Michael Mauboussin untangles the intricate strands of skill and luck, defines them, and provides useful frameworks for analyzing their relative contributions. He offers concrete suggestions for how to put these insights to work to your advantage in business and other dimensions of life.

About the author:
Michael J. Mauboussin is a Managing Director and Head of Global Financial Strategies at Credit Suisse. Prior to rejoining CS in 2013, he was Chief Investment Strategist at Legg Mason Capital Management. He is also the author of three books, including More Than You Know: Finding Financial Wisdom in Unconventional Places, named in the The 100 Best Business Books of All Time by 800-CEO-Read. Michael has been an adjunct professor of finance at Columbia Business School since 1993, and received the Dean’s Award for Teaching Excellence in 2009. He is also chairman of the board of trustees of the Santa Fe Institute, a leading center for mulch-disciplinary research in complex systems theory.

Category: Cognitive Foibles, Video

Smarter and Less Smart As We Age

Academic Eric Johnson explains the impact of intelligence on finances at an Atlanta Fed Public Affairs Forum

 

 

Via Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta

 

Category: Cognitive Foibles, Psychology, Video

Last month, I spilled a considerable number of pixels explaining why Rupert Murdoch’s Time Warner bid had no significance to whether or not this is a market top. My short list included complaints of cherry picked data that somehow ignored most of Murdoch’s M&A activity over the past half century; a laughably small sample size…Read More

Category: Cognitive Foibles, Investing, Markets, Psychology, Really, really bad calls, Trading

Masters in Business: Michael Mauboussin

Michael Mauboussin began his career at Drexel Burnham Lambert in the 1980s through what he describes as a random stroke of good luck. He worked closely with Bill Miller, former chairman of Legg Mason Capital Management, and is now head of global financial strategies at Credit Suisse. He is also an adjunct at Columbia University…Read More

Category: Cognitive Foibles, Media

Cognitive Dissonance Is Hurting Your Returns

Regular readers know I enjoy discussing behavioral aspects of investing. The reasons for this are twofold: First, we can’t control the markets, but we can control our own reactions to it (at least we can try). And second, many studies have shown that investors suffer from a behavior gap between what they should garner in…Read More

Category: Cognitive Foibles, Investing, Psychology

Rupert Murdoch and The Dumbest Chart in the World

Yesterday morning, we learned of Rupert Murdoch’s bid for Time Warner for as much as $85 dollar a share, or more than $75 billion. Soon after, the annotated chart below showing the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index began circulating on trading desks and websites, suggesting Murdoch’s offer signaled a market top. Source: Financial Insyghts LLC…Read More

Category: Cognitive Foibles, Investing, M&A, UnGuru