Posts filed under “Digital Media”

The Universe of Pop Culture Bears

I woke up this morning, and true to my travel history, markets are under pressure. After I saw the futures this AM, I thought of this:


Source: FastCo Design

Category: Digital Media, Humor, Markets

Where Are Clothes Manufactured?

Click for an interactive graphic. Source: Visual.ly

Category: Digital Media, Economy, Markets

Degrees of Spending

Click for some interactive internets. Source: Retale

Category: Consumer Spending, Digital Media

Amazon Fire Phone Review: Full of Gimmicks, Lacking Basics

Source: WSJ

Category: Digital Media, Technology

Tweets of the Week 7.25.14

Markets & Investing The chase for higher yield continues Investors are rushing into emerging markets looking for higher yields http://t.co/UVjHqBn6pf pic.twitter.com/m1gtsFHEAd — Wall Street Journal (@WSJ) July 23, 2014 Contrarian investing at its finest the more people say you can't buy bonds, the higher bond prices go. it's kind of awesome — J.C. Parets (@allstarcharts)…Read More

Category: Digital Media

Marijuana Laws by State in USA

Source: Vox

Category: Digital Media, Legal, Politics

Top 50 S&P 500 Companies’ 401(k)s

  Click for the interactive version.   Source: Bloomberg Visual Data  

Category: 401(k), Corporate Management, Digital Media

Searching for water on Ganymede

Source: Know More

Category: Digital Media, Science

The Middle East Friendship Chart

Source: Slate

Category: Digital Media, Politics, War/Defense

Global House Price Index

Home sales, at least in the U.S., seem to be rising. Existing home sales in June increased to 5.04 million annualized. That number may be affected by the weather, as June sales most likely come from contracts signed after the depths of winter.

To find out if this is a global improvement, we can take a look at the International Monetary Fund’s Global House Price Index. Its data and lovely infographics give us a few interesting things to digest. (You can also use the BIS data or OECD statistics).

The first chart shows the annual percentage change in housing prices. The U.S. is 10th, and housing prices in the country are still far below (35 percent, or so) their 2006 peak.

Continues here

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Category: Data Analysis, Digital Media, Real Estate