Posts filed under “Energy”

United Kingdom Housing Energy Fact File 2013

Category: Digital Media, Energy, Think Tank

4th Anniversary of Gulf Oil Spill

BP and the Government Decided to Temporarily Hide the Oil by Sinking It with Toxic Chemicals … The Gulf Ecosystem Is Now Paying the Price   As we noted at the time, and on the first (and here), second and third anniversaries of BP’s Gulf oil spill, BP and the government made the spill much…Read More

Category: Energy, Really, really bad calls, Think Tank

Wind, Solar and Hydro Could Power All 50 States

It’s a MYTH that We Need Fossil Fuel Or Nuclear The big oil, gas, coal and nuclear companies claim that we need those energy sources in order to power America. Good news: it’s a myth. Mark Diesendorf – Associate Professor and Deputy Director, Institute of Environmental Studies, UNSW at the University of New South Wales…Read More

Category: Energy, Think Tank

Fracking Regulation

Source: Oil Buyer’s Guide, Bloomberg Brief

Category: Energy, Regulation

Tanker Tracker

Source: Oil Buyer’s Guide, Bloomberg Brief

Category: Digital Media, Energy, Transports

NASA Image Shows North Korea in the Dark

North Korea has a population of around 24 million people but a photo released by NASA reveals that at night the country is almost completely dark compared to its neighbors China and South Korea. WSJ’s Monika Vosough reports. (NASA)

Category: Energy, Video

Your Broccoli Is Way Too Thirsty

Click for larger graphic Source: MoJo via WaPo Continues here

Category: Commodities, Digital Media, Energy, Food and Drink

Category: Energy, Think Tank

How Does the U.S. Power Grid Work?

Very cool explanatory:

With over 160,000 miles of transmission lines, the U.S. power grid is designed to handle natural and man-made disasters, as well as fluctuations in demand. How does the system work? WSJ’s Jason Bellini has #TheShortAnswer.

Category: Energy, Technology, Video

Putting Fukushima In Perspective

There was no background radioactive cesium before above-ground nuclear testing and nuclear accidents started. Wikipedia provides some details on the distribution of cesium-137 due to human activities: Small amounts of caesium-134 and caesium-137 were released into the environment during nearly all nuclear weapon tests and some nuclear accidents, most notably the Chernobyl disaster. *** Caesium-137…Read More

Category: Energy, Really, really bad calls, Think Tank