Posts filed under “Friday Night Jazz”

Let It Be: Fiat Monkees & Golden Beatles

Let It Be: Fiat Monkees & Golden Beatles
By Grant Williams

“And when the brokenhearted people
Living in the world agree
There will be an answer, let it be.”
– Let It Be, The Beatles

 

“Oh, and our good times starts and end
Without dollar one to spend.
But how much, baby, do we really need?”
– Daydream Believer, The Monkees

 

“But today there is no day or night
Today there is no dark or light.
Today there is no black or white,
Only shades of gray.”
– Shades of Grey, The Monkees

 

“Living is easy with eyes closed
Misunderstanding all you see.”
– Strawberry Fields Forever, The Beatles

 

 

Things That Make You Go Hmmm…

Madness!! Auditions. Folk & Roll Musicians-Singers for acting roles in new TV series. Running Parts for 4 insane boys, age 17-21. Want spirited Ben Frank’s types. Have courage to work. Must come down for interview.

On September 8-10, 1965, this ad appeared in the Hollywood Reporter and Daily Variety, as two aspiring filmmakers, Bob Rafelson and Bert Schneider, inspired by what was to become one of the best and most influential musical films of all time, set about trying to cast the leads in a television show about four crazy kids living the rock ‘n’ roll lifestyle that the protagonists in the aforementioned film had made so appealing to the masses.

 

Monkees%20LP%20Cover.psd

 

That film was A Hard Day’s Night, its stars The Beatles, and the four young men (chosen from 437 applicants) who would be groomed to supplant them in Americans’ hearts and minds were Davy Jones, Mickey Dolenz, Peter Tork, and Mike Nesmith. Together, these four part-time musicians and wannabe actors would become The Monkees; and Rafelson & Schneider’s plan was to make them bigger than even The Beatles could dream of being. Armed as they were with the power of television entering its golden age, they had the odds stacked in their favour — or so it seemed.

In 1965, the Beatles were the preeminent band in the world and at the very peak of their power. The time seemed right for a knock-off band that would enable its architects to live the high life and create untold riches out of thin air. After all, The Beatles were genuinely talented songwriters and musicians, and those were in limited supply, even in the 1960s. It was far easier to produce a band that didn’t have to rely on something tangible, such as talent, in order to be accepted by the public — as long as you could sell it to people by capitalizing on The Beatles’ success.

That band was to be The Monkees.

The premise was, in the words of Dolenz, to produce “a TV show about an imaginary band … that wanted to be The Beatles, [but] that was never successful”.

The Beatles were music’s gold standard; the Monkees would be a convenient fiat alternative.

Interestingly enough, given this week’s reference to The Beatles, the word fiat comes from the Latin fiat, meaning “let it be” (or “it shall be”; but, since Paul McCartney didn’t choose that as the title of his anthem to the assumption that everything will magically work out in the end, it’s not quite as convenient for the purposes of my ramblings).

How did the fiat alternative to John, Paul, George, and Ringo fare? Well, the answer is perhaps somewhat surprising.

Initially, The Pre-Fab Four, Mike, Davy, Peter, and Mickey (it just doesn’t have the same ring[o] to it, I’m afraid), were assiduously kept away from the musical instruments they were supposed to play when recording the songs that would, according to Rafelson & Schneider’s strategy, sell by the millions and make everybody rich — despite the fact that they were all reasonably accomplished musicians and, in the case of Nesmith and, latterly, Dolenz, capable of composing successful pop songs.

Jones was chosen to sing lead vocals (something that rankled with the rest of the band, who felt that Dolenz’s more distinctive voice was far more likely to set the band apart); Dolenz was picked as the drummer (even though Jones was far more accomplished in that role, but his diminutive stature meant he disappeared behind the high-hat cymbals); Nesmith took lead guitar (even though Dolenz was an accomplished guitarist but had never played drums before); and that left Tork, who picked up the bass (even though Nesmith was skilled in the playing of that instrument) and keyboards.

In short, an alternative to the most successful band of the day was created by parties interested in having a simpler, more lucrative alternative under their control. It was created and configured not with its long-term viability in mind but rather with appearances as the main driver, in the expectation that, even though the level of talent underpinning the band was hardly of the calibre of Lennon & McCartney, it would be enough — at least for a while.

And guess what? It was.

In August 1966, the Monkees’ debut single, “Last Train to Clarksville”, was released and Monkeemania was born. The group’s network TV show debuted a month later, in September 1966 (in the days when there were only a handful of channels to watch). It was designed to appeal to the teen audience enthralled with the lovable Brits, and so the band’s popularity was assured — despite the impracticalities of the project, which were highlighted very clearly in a review that ran in the Washington Post:

The series stars a fearsome foursome in the Monkees, a wholly manufactured singing group of attractive young men who come off as a combination of The Beatles, the Dead End Kids and the Marx Brothers. Critics will cry foul. Longhairs will demand, outraged, that they be removed from the air. But the kids will adore the Monkees …. unlike other rock ‘n’ roll groups, the boys had never performed together before. Indeed, they’d never even met …. they’ve been working to create their own sound.

In reality, the Monkees didn’t play their own instruments on their debut album (which led to enormous conflict between the band and their producers), but the popularity of “The Fiatles” was undiminished. Their “upbeat, young, happy, driving, pulsating sound” was all that mattered to both their creators and their audience. As long as the masses accepted The Monkees, the talent underpinning their success was of altogether secondary importance.

The following year, 1967, something rather extraordinary happened.

That year, The Beatles released a collection of songs in an album entitled Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band — which would go on to be voted the number-one album of all time by Rolling Stone magazine (a position it retains to this day). Meanwhile, another popular rock combo of the day, The Rolling Stones, released two albums, Between the Buttons and Their Satanic Majesties Request; Jimi Hendrix introduced the public to Are You Experienced?; and The Doors unveiled their eponymous debut album, featuring “Break on Through”, “The End”, and “Light My Fire”.

Well, guess what?

The number-one, top-selling album of 1967 was (drum roll, please):

More%20Of%20The%20Monkees.psd

Yes folks, More of The Monkees, featuring “When Love Comes Knockin’ (At Your Door)”, written by Carole Bayer Sager and Neil Sedaka; “Sometime in the Morning”, penned by Gerry Goffin and Carole King; “(I’m Not Your) Steppin’ Stone”, by Boyce and Hart; and the instant classic “I’m A Believer” … hot off the pen of Neil Diamond.

Not only that, but if we let our eyes wander down the list of 1967′s best-selling albums, we find at number two The Monkees, which included “(Theme from) The Monkees” and “Last Train to Clarksville” — both of which were writen by Boyce and Hart.

Monkee%20Album%20Cover.psd

Now, to be absolutely clear, I am not bagging the Monkees — I happen to love their music — but merely making the (somewhat labored) point that sometimes a fiat alternative to something backed with something a little more valuable, can have its day in the sun and even supplant its intrinsically more sound cousin for a brief period.

But ultimately, over time, something which is real will always be recognized by the masses as superior to something created for superficial purposes — particularly during times of crisis.

For those keeping score at home, The Beatles and The Rolling Stones are second only to Bob Dylan’s 11 albums in the top 500, with 10 each, and the Beatles have 4 albums in the top 10 (including, of course, the number-one album of all-time in Sgt. Pepper).

The Monkees don’t appear in the top 500.

~~~

-Grant Williams

 

 

Category: Friday Night Jazz, Music, Think Tank

George Carlin: All My Stuff $115

George Carlin: All My Stuff (2007) Normally $189.98, now on sale for $115 This 14-disc career retrospective set includes all twelve of George Carlin s HBO concert specials, spanning nearly thirty years. One of the greatest comedians of all time, Carlin performs his most memorable routines (Baseball and Football, A Place for My Stuff, Losing…Read More

Category: Friday Night Jazz, Humor, Weekend

McCartney Rules

1. Excellence If it’s not great, don’t release it. Put it up on YouTube, not the album, if you’re trying to get everybody’s attention, make sure your music deserves it. 2. Availability Put your complete album on YouTube and all streaming services. That’s where people discover your music. Your hard core fans will buy it,…Read More

Category: Friday Night Jazz, Music

Paul McCartney is Awesome. EOM

Paul McCartney has a new album of all-new material coming out this Tuesday titled ‘New‘, which is also the name of the lead single, which I’ve just started to hear on some local stations today. To promote the record, Paul’s been making the traditional media rounds and some non-traditional stops as well. Yesterday Paul and…Read More

Category: Friday Night Jazz, Music, Weekend

Song of the Summer: Blurred Lines’ Best Covers

Duke – Blurred lines COVER Jimmy Fallon, Robin Thicke & The Roots Sing “Blurred Lines” Robin Thicke – Blurred Lines (Taryn Southern, Julia Price, Jimmy Kimmel and Guillermo in “Blurred Lines” (feat. Robin Thicke Queens Of The Stone Age – Blurred Lines (Live Lounge) Vampire Weekend Robin Thicke Blurred Lines BBC Radio 1 Live Lo…Read More

Category: Friday Night Jazz, Music, Weekend

Friday Night Music IP Litigation: Robin Thicke vs Marvin Gaye

The argument that the beat and falsetto are property of the Marvin Gaye estate strikes me as a stretch. These songs have a similarities, but its a gonna be tough for the Gaye Estate to prove infringement.   Marvin Gaye – Got To Give It Up   Robin Thicke – Blurred Lines ft. T.I., Pharrell…Read More

Category: Friday Night Jazz, Intellectual Property, Music

Kat Edmonson Covers ‘Just Like Heaven’

Kat Edmonson ‘Just Like Heaven’ from her 2009 album ‘Take To The Sky’       Previously: Just Like Heaven (August 13th, 2010) (A lovely cover of The Cure’s Just Like Heaven from Katie Melua)  

Category: Friday Night Jazz, Music, Weekend

Fleetwood Mac, Jones Beach Theater

Last weekend, on a gorgeous evening, I took the missus to see Fleetwood Mac at Jones Beach Theater.

They were never my kinda band, although I will admit to liking the album Fleetwood Mac. Their breakout hit, Rumors, was too commercial for me, lacking much of an edge. (Bill Clinton adopted Don’t Stop (thinking about tomorrow) as his campaign theme song)

The years have treated the songs surprisingly well — they more or less hold up. My guess is because of what an interesting and brilliant guitarist Lindsey Buckingham is. (I had no idea prior). Stevie Nicks has a huge fan base who adore her, but I found her sincere but a bit ditzy, and she seemingly messed up the lyrics to Rhiannon.

They are doing a national tour, and I assume they are going to get tighter as the shows go on. If you are a fan, you are encouraged to go. Everyone else can skip it.

 

Photos after the jump

 

 

Fleetwood Mac, Jones Beach Theater, Wantagh, NY
FLeetwood mac setlist

 

Read More

Category: Friday Night Jazz, Music, Weekend

Friday Night Mash Up: I Heart Bowie

  DJ Supercrunk spent the last few months working on a David Bowie-inspired mash-up tribute album entitled I HEART BOWIE. You can download the album for free at IHEARTBOWIEPROJECT.COM. He sampled David Bowie’s music and remixed it with hip-hop heavyweights. As a long-time Bowie fan and a hip-hop DJ, he considers this piece of work…Read More

Category: Friday Night Jazz, Music

Daft Punk: Covers of Get Lucky, Game of Love

Last week, we published Bob Lefsetz’ discussion of The Daft Punk Album. Tonite, a couple of outstanding covers of a few songs on the album: —————————————-­——————————- San Cisco put a different spin on Daft Punk’s huge tune ‘Get Lucky’ with some very unique percussion (read: bongos). Like A Version is a segment on Australian radio…Read More

Category: Friday Night Jazz, Music