Posts filed under “Philosophy”

How to Increase Productivity and Enjoy Life More

The “Sprinter” Method of Increasing Productivity

Tony Schwartz notes:

Our most fundamental need as human beings is to spend and renew energy.

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When I began to crash in the early afternoon following my red-eye flight, I took a 30-minute nap in the room we have set aside for that purpose in our office. The nap didn’t give me nearly enough rest to fully catch up, but it powerfully revived me for the next several hours.

At the other end of the spectrum, exercise … positively influences our cognitive functioning, and our mood.

The truth is that we ought to be exercising nearly every day, ideally for at least 45 minutes, including strength training at least twice a week.

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The secret to optimal well-being and effectiveness is to make more rhythmic waves in your life.To build the highest level of fitness, for example, it’s critical to challenge the heart at high intensity for short periods of time, and then to recover deeply.

The bigger the amplitude of your wave — the higher your maximum heart rate, and the more deeply you recover — the more flexibly you can respond to varying demands and the healthier you likely are.

The same rhythmic movement serves us well all day long, but instead we live mostly linear, sedentary lives. We go from email to email, and meeting to meeting, almost never getting much movement, and rarely taking time to recover mentally and emotionally.

Even a little intentional recovery can go a long way. It’s possible, for example, to clear the bloodstream of cortisol just by breathing deeply — in to a count of three, out to a count of six — for as little as a minute. Try it right now. See if it changes the way you feel.

Paradoxically, the most effective way to operate at work is like a sprinter, working with single-minded focus for periods of no longer than 90 minutes, and then taking a break. That way when you’re working, you’re really working, and when you’re recovering, you’re truly refueling the tank.

Making rhythmic waves is the secret to getting more done, in less time, at a higher level of engagement, with a better and more sustainable quality of life.

Schwartz explained last year:

In the renowned 1993 study of young violinists, performance researcher Anders Ericsson found that the best ones all practiced the same way: in the morning, in three increments of no more than 90 minutes each, with a break between each one. Ericcson found the same pattern among other musicians, athletes, chess players and writers.

For the first several books I wrote, I typically sat at my desk for 10 or even 12 hours at a time. I never finished a book in less than a year. For my new book, The Way We’re Working Isn’t Working, I wrote without interruptions for three 90 minute periods, and took a break between each one. I had breakfast after the first session, went for a run after the second, and had lunch after the third. I wrote no more than 4 1/2 hours a day, and finished the book in less than six months. By limiting each writing cycle to 90 minutes and building in periods of renewal, I was able to focus far more intensely and get more done in far less time.

The counterintuitive secret to sustainable great performance is to live like a sprinter. In practice, that means working at your highest intensity in the mornings, for no more than 90 minutes at a time before taking a true break. And getting those who work for you to do the same.

Obviously, it’s not possible for every employee to work in multiple uninterrupted 90-minute sprints, given the range of demands they face. It is possible for you as a leader and managers to make a shift in the way you manage your energy, and to better model this new way of working yourself. Make it a high priority to find at least one time a day–preferably in the morning–to focus single-mindedly on your most challenging and important task for 60 to 90 minutes. Encourage those who work for you to do the same.

In addition, encourage your employees to take true renewal breaks intermittently through the day. It’s possible to get a great deal of renewal in a very short time. Try this technique, for example:

Build a more rhythmic pulse into your workdays and you’ll increase your own effectiveness and your satisfaction. Support this way of working among those you manage and you’ll fuel both loyalty and huge competitive advantage.

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Category: Philosophy

New Year’s Resolution: MIT OpenCourseWare

Exercise, Lose Weight,  Quit Smoking or Drinking, Pay down debt, Stop [insert nasty habit here] . . . The typical New Year’s resolutions are well intentioned but hollow gestures, forgotten by February. May I suggest something that might be longer lasting and more fruitful resolution? Knowledge. Pick an area of study that truly interests you,…Read More

Category: Philosophy

Handbook for Life: 52 Tips for Happiness and Productivity

Around this time of year, people begin making New Year’s resolutions. They are invariably doomed to failure for the same reason most diets don’t work: One-offs fail to change the underlying habits and beliefs that drive our daily behaviors. That is why I found this list of Zen Habits by Leo Babauta so enchanting. The…Read More

Category: Philosophy, Weekend

This Small Blue Marble

NASA calls the photo below (via Good) “the most detailed true-color image of the entire Earth to date.” It is a spectacular reminder of the small blue marble called planet Earth, and what we humans can accomplish when we cooperate and work together towards a common goal. Regardless of your beliefs system or chosen faith,…Read More

Category: Philosophy, Science, Technology

QOTD: Give a man a gun . . .

A friend sends this quote, which I really like but have been unable to verify: ‎ “Give a man a gun and he can rob a bank. Give a man a bank and he can rob the world.” -Jim Trotter Can any one confirm that is a real quote by Mr. Trotter?

Category: Legal, Philosophy

Billionaires’ Top 10 List for Success

Barbara Walters on 20/20 (via The Wealth Report) interviews four billionaires, and culls out some wisdom for managing success. You may recall that this is an area I have some interest in. Back in June, I wrote up something along similar lines: 7 life lessons from the very wealthy. Back to The Wealth Report: Here…Read More

Category: Investing, Philosophy, Psychology

What Science Lovers Link to Most

Click for interactive chart: Source: Physics or Fashion? What Science Lovers Link to Most Scientific American, November 2011

Category: Philosophy, Science

Presidential Blame & Credit

Jim McTeague of Barron’s asked a question that led to an even more interesting question. It started as the usual Presidential Election and the stock markets related inquiry — Is President Obama a positive or negative for stock and bond markets? — as I thought about the question, it devolved into something entirely else. I…Read More

Category: Economy, Markets, Philosophy, Politics

The Housing Crash Was Caused by MTV Cribs

Fascinating back and forth in last night’s discussion of what Causation actually is. I want to respond broadly to some of the advocates who still seem to be missing the concept of Proximate Cause. We can substitute all sorts of things in the general statement “The housing boom and bust was caused by ____” —…Read More

Category: Philosophy, Really, really bad calls

The US is Now a Corporate Monarchy

I did an interview with a print reporter yesterday about what has been going on with lack of prosecutions, the banks, and Wall Street in general. We discussed the corrupt exchanges and HFT. I dropped lots of F-Bombs, called out cowards and crooks and held nothing back. (“That fucker belongs in prison; this son of…Read More

Category: Philosophy, Politics, Really, really bad calls