Posts filed under “Real Estate”

Then & Now

Over the past 3½ years markets crawled higher, we have
watched the gradual but steady build up of bullish expectations. You can see it
most plainly in the 2006 BusinessWeek forecasts. The majority of strategists,
technicians and economists are expecting gains for the markets in 2006, ranging
from mid-single digits up to as high as 30%.

In the Fall of 2002, you were hard pressed to find such
sentiment. As telecom stocks bottomed, and profitable technology stocks sold
for less than cash on hand, the Bulls were MIA. Telecom, tech and internet
stocks, having so duplicitously betrayed their lovers, were widely despised.

It wasn’t only the sentiment that was different back then:
Nearly every metric we track was in a different part of the cycle, and pointing
in a different direction. Both the vector and angular momentum were different
than at present. Consider each of the following:

Interest Rates: In 2002, bond yields were low and heading
lower. Since then, bonds have worked their way lower sending yields considerably
higher – and they’re heading even higher still; (See nearby Yield Curve charts);

Inflation: The Fed reflated the economy, but awoke
inflation. 3 years ago, prices were stable; the big fear was deflation. Today,
prices for goods and services are rising.

Earnings Growth: Year-over-Year earnings were awful in 2002, with easy comparisons, and
nowhere to go but up. Today, with comparisons much harder, earnings growth is a
the top of its range, and is more likely to decelerate;

Fiscal Policy: The Deficit was modest; Federal taxes,
especially those on dividends and capital gains, were being cut. Today, rates are more likely to rise than
drop. Taxes at the State and local level have been creeping higher;

Real Estate: was beginning a historic growth spurt with
major economic impacts: it created 42% of new private sector jobs, allowed
mortgage equity extraction of $2 trillion dollars, and drove massive consumer
spending – and GDP. Today, at best RE is cooling down; At worst . . .

Consumer Debt: was problematic, but manageable. Now, the
negative savings rate combined with significant increases in mortgage debt are
extremely concerning.

Commodities: Oil was
under $30 and exerted little drag on consumer spending or transport costs;
Industrial Metals were cheap, Gold and Silver were half their present
prices.

The macro environment, despite the negative sentiment – or more accurately, in large part, because of it – was far
more attractive three years ago than it is today.

Is this a case of the “Wall
of Worry”
or more like “What, Me Worry?”

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Note:  This was part of a larger research piece that was emailed to institutional clients on April 11, 2006 at ~10:00am

Category: Commodities, Consumer Spending, Earnings, Economy, Employment, Fixed Income/Interest Rates, Inflation, Psychology, Real Estate

Real Estate: Come to Our Sale Price Improvement Event!

Category: Real Estate

New Real Estate Phase: Repricing Houses Downwards?

Category: Economy, Federal Reserve, Markets, Real Estate

Exisiting Home Sales Pop

Category: Economy, Federal Reserve, Real Estate

Household Borrowing and the Mortgage Resets

Category: Real Estate

Coming Soon: Mortgage Payment Resets

Category: Economy, Real Estate, Retail

Real Estate Round Up

This past week saw a lot of Real Estate related data, all of which fits our long term thesis about the macro economy and what’s to come over the next few years.

For those of you who may be newer to the site, we have been dicussing this for quite a while: starting in December 2004, we noted how Real Estate was a prime driver of the economy, and in Spring 2005, how new hiring was overly reliant on the Real Estate Sector; in August 2005, we called that Housing was beginning to show signs of cooling, and that this would eventually wreak havoc on consumer spending. In the Fall 2005, we noted how dependent GDP had become on Mortgage Equity extraction. You can find all of these by using the site search function, right sidebar.

Now as  of March 2006, most of these concepts have become widely recognized and (mostly) accepted — but when they were first introduced here, there was no small amount of incredulity and pushback surrounding them.

Looking forward, I see rates rising, housing cooling further, the consumer cutting back, and the stimulus driven economy slowing, if not slipping into an outright recession.

On to the round up:

Existing Home Sales Slip 5th Consec Month

Home Foreclosure Surge

Home Prices Decellerate

Supply Up, New Homes Sales Down

New Homes Sales: 4th Drop in 6 months

• And the most ironic piece of all, The WSJ’s Greg Ip Discovers Data Manipulation

There’s more all over the web if you want to surf, but that’s the main gist of it.

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UPDATE March 5, 2006 4:44pm

The NYT’s Sunday Magazine is all about Real Estate

Go to Introduction: The For-Sale Society

See the Sunday Times Mag TOC after the jump . . .

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Read More

Category: Real Estate

Fundamentally Speaking . . .

Category: Earnings, Economy, Federal Reserve, Inflation, Psychology, Real Estate

Supply Up, New Homes Sales Down

Category: Real Estate

Existing Home Sales Slip 5th Consec Month

Category: Real Estate