Posts filed under “Retail”

No, Black Friday Sales Were Not Up 16% (not even 6%)

If its the Monday after Black Friday, then its national hype the fabricated data day!

Every year around this time, we get a series of loose reports coincident with Black Friday and the holiday weekend. Each year, they are wildly optimistic. And like clockwork, the media idiotically repeats these trade organizations spin like its gospel. When the data finally comes in, we learn that the early reports were pure hokum, put out by trade groups to create shopping hype. (Yes, the Media ALWAYS screws the pooch big time on this one, with the occasional exception).

Let’s start with this whopper from an utterly breathless press release from the National Retail Federation:

“U.S. retail sales during Thanksgiving weekend climbed 16 percent to a record as shoppers flocked to stores earlier and spent more, according to the National Retail Federation.

Sales totaled $52.4 billion, and the average shopper spent $398.62 during the holiday weekend, up from $365.34 a year earlier, the Washington-based trade group said in a statement today, citing a survey conducted by BIGresearch. More than a third of that — an average of $150.53 — was spent online.”

No, retail sales did not climb 16%. Surveys where people forecast their own future spending are, as we have seen repeatedly in the past, pretty much worthless.

We actually have no idea just yet as to whether, and exactly how much, sales climbed. The data simply is not in yet. The most you can accurately say is according to some foot traffic measurements, more people appeared to be in stores on Black Friday 2011 than in 2010.

Another absurd example: Does any one actually believe “nearly one-quarter (24.4%) of Black Friday shoppers were at the stores by midnight on Black Friday”? Perhaps the NRF competing with the NAR for title of most ridiculous trade group.

Next up is ShopperTrak, who claimed a 6.6% gain in sales:

“Shoppers packed stores and spent money in record numbers on Black Friday, early surveys show, a phenomenon that analysts call a hopeful sign for the U.S economy after months of up-and-down consumer spending.

Black Friday sales were up 6.6 percent over last year and foot traffic in stores was up 5.1 percent, according to ShopperTrak, a Chicago-based research firm. The year-to-year spending increase was the greatest since 2007, the firm reported . . .”

What is the basis of that 6.6% gain? ShopperTrak “uses equipment installed in stores to measure traffic.” But that does not measure changes in window shoppers vs buyers from year to year, how much money and or credit people have, how large their holiday budgets are, or how much they are willing to spend. It is a very poor system for forecasting actual sales.

The fact that NRF and ShopperTrak are so widely disparate confirms for us at least one of their methodologies are suspect. In my opinion, both are mostly meaningless.

Here is my challenge to the CEOs of the National Retail Federation and ShopperTrak: $1,000 to the charity of the winners choice that your forecasts for Black Friday, the Thanksgiving weekend and the entire holiday shopping season are wildly off. I bet you your forecasts miss the mark by at least 10%-20% (though I believe its closer to 40-50%).

>

Previously:

More To Holiday Sales Than A Few Phone Calls (November 28th, 2005)

There They Go Again: NRF Redux (July 28th, 2006)

More Bad Data from the NRF? (November 2006)

Repeat After Me: Spending Surveys Are Meaningless (October 2007)

How Good Were Holiday Sales Really? (January 10th, 2008)

Spinning Black Friday Retail Sales (December 1st, 2008)

Entering the Holiday Shopping Season (Beware Surveys!) (October 28th, 2009)

We Don’t Know How Black Friday Sales Were Yet (November 28th, 2009)

In Stock! Bad Holiday Sales Forecasts (November 30th, 2009)

Category: Consumer Spending, Data Analysis, Really, really bad calls, Retail

Amazon May Soon Become a ‘Top 10′ Retailer

Isabel Cavill, an analyst at Planet Retail, talks about the outlook for consumer spending and online retailers including Amazon.com Inc. She speaks with Francine Lacqua on Bloomberg Television’s “Countdown.”


Bloomberg, Nov. 24

Category: Retail, Video

Daily Deals by the Numbers

In light of Groupon’s IPO, have a look at this cool graphic from BuySellAds: > Thanks, Scott!

Category: Digital Media, Retail, Think Tank, Web/Tech

How Much Money Will Consumers Spend This Holiday Season?

Click to enlarge graphic: Source: How Much Money Will Consumers Spend This Holiday Season? Mashable, November 1, 2011

Category: Consumer Spending, Digital Media, Retail, Web/Tech

American Familys’ Money: Where Does It Go?

Interesting chart showing a breakdown of where the family budget goues: via infographiclist

Category: Consumer Spending, Economy, Retail

Mazda RX-8 Bites The Dust

Declining sales and new emission standards forced Mazda to finally pull the plug on the RX-8, the last of its rotary engine sports cars. > Here’s Motorward: The production of this car has been canceled back in July, and the remaining cars will be sold before the year end, and then the RX-8 will be…Read More

Category: Retail, Weekend

Amazon Apple Parallel Charts

Amazon.com’s stock-market value exceeded $100 billion yesterday for the first time, and anyone looking at how closely the world’s largest online retailer has tracked Apple Inc. might have predicted as much. The chart above shows the market capitalization of the two companies during the past five years. Amazon.com’s value jumped ninefold in the period as…Read More

Category: Consumer Spending, Markets, Retail, Technical Analysis, Web/Tech

Best Buy (BBY): Amazon’s (AMZN) Showroom?

Bloomberg television ran a brief segment in which they posited that Best Buy (BBY) has effectively become Amazon’s (AMZN) biatch.  And I think there’s some truth to that.  This is no doubt one of the consequences of a population that walks around with smartphones running barcode scanning applications that allow us to see, touch, examine, try…Read More

Category: Consumer Spending, Markets, Retail, Technology, Web/Tech

Holidays by the Numbers

Even more holiday chart porn, via Daily Infographic: > click for ginormous infographic:

Category: Digital Media, Retail

Retail Sales Increase Most in 5 years

Leading into the holiday period, the data — and by data, I refer to actual sales numbers, and not surveys, gut feelings or instincts — was strongly suggesting that the 2010 orgy of consumerism known as the holiday shopping season was likely to be stronger than expected. The first clue I had of this was…Read More

Category: Consumer Spending, Psychology, Retail