Posts filed under “Retail”

Tech Gadgets vs Durable Goods

Its the first Thursday of the month, so we will be getting monthly sales from many retail stores throughout today. Related to that, I am fascinated by this story in the WSJ.

Durable Goods, Furniture, Apparel are out; In: Laptops, iPads, iPods; the staycation crowd are buying Blu-ray video players and big plasma screen televisions. And one retail exec called the iPhone “a new fashion accessory.”

Here’s your WSJ ubiq-cerpt™:

“Americans are spending more on electronics like iPads and flat-screen televisions and less on durable goods like furniture, washing machines and lawn mowers, according to government data released Tuesday.

The shift reflects a change in priorities for American consumers. After pouring money into all aspects of their homes during the previous decade, consumers are redirecting their purchases to eye-grabbing technology and socking away more of what’s left over into savings. Apparel company executives are worried the lure of electronics will eat into their sales as the back-to-school season gets under way.

Outlays for televisions, computers, video and telephone equipment grew 1.8% in the first six months of this year, compared to the first half of pre-recession 2007, the Commerce Department said Tuesday. By comparison, spending on appliances decreased 3.6% during the same period, and spending on furniture decreased 11% during that time.

Overall, consumer spending stayed flat in June from the previous month, the Commerce Department said Tuesday. Meanwhile, the U.S. savings rate ticked up to 6.4% in June from the previous month, its highest point in a year and far above its pre-recession level.” (emphasis added)

I cannot judge by my own spending — three years ago, we bought a house that needed major renovations — but the success of Apple’s sales throughout the recession makes the point.

And the Journal makes the case that it is in not just Apple, but the entire tech sector that is enjoying consumer interest . . .

>

>

Previously:
Counter-Cyclical Spending (during recessions) (March 17th, 2010)

Sources:
Tech Gadgets Steal Sales From Appliances, Clothes
EMMELINE ZHAO
WSJ AUGUST 3, 2010
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703545604575407580208239338.html

Category: Consumer Spending, Retail, Technology

One Last Look at Mortgage Defaults Driving Retail Sales

Yet another case of anecdote trumping evidence: I am more than willing to entertain the possibility that squatters are a key component of this economic rebound, if only someone can show me some data that supports it. However, charts like the following, that calculate liabilities owed, are only half the equation: > 7+ Million Homeowners…Read More

Category: Credit, Real Estate, Retail

More on Mortgage Delinquencies & Retail Spending

The latest bad meme to develop legs is the idea that strategic mortgage defaults are goosing retail sales. We looked at this last week in Are Defaults Really Driving Retail Spending? as an idea driven mostly by anecdote (some quite ugly), but unsupported by any hard data.

To those pushing this idea, I ask this: Are these mortgage mod requests from egregiously irresponsible spendthrifts the exception, or the rule? And, if they are more than an exception, would you please produce actual data supporting this thesis?

After my post on this, I got dozens of emails with anecdotal stories of defaulting homeowners going on spending sprees. Many were so similar that I presumed they were email forwards from the same source. Also, Bill Gates wants to send me to Disneyland.

I started hunting for more info on this. I came across three items that are worth discussing. (if you know of any other data sources in this, feel free to mention in comments)

The first item was a quote from Mark Zandi in Monday’s WSJ:

How much can the world count on the U.S. consumer?

U.S. consumers remain the single largest source of global demand, even if their clout isn’t what it once was. J.P. Morgan estimates U.S. consumer spending will account for one-fourth of the global total in 2010, down from about 35% in 2003. Still, the global recession spread to Latin America and Asia when U.S. buyers put away their credit cards.

In recent months, U.S. consumer spending has turned upward and may continue that way for some time, says Economy.com economist Mark Zandi, who figures pent up demand will boost car and home sales. But the long-term outlook is hardly solid. Part of the reason for Mr. Zandi’s short-term bullishness is that he figures about five million households aren’t making payments on their mortgages, giving them as much as $60 billion to spend—for now. -WSJ

Zandi appears to have come up with his $60 billion figure (as far as I can tell) by taking 5 million delinquent home owners X a ballpark $1000 per month mortgage X 12 months = $60B.

Let’s take a closer look at Zandi’s analysis to see if it holds water.

- The March 2010 NFP report data had 15.0 million unemployed persons; the number of “long-term unemployed” rose to 6.5 million — 44.1% of total unemployed. An additional 9.1 million people working part time because full time work was unavailable.

Its reasonable to surmise that there is a huge overlap between the 24 million people either unemployed or under employed, and the 5 million foreclosures, and 6 million+ late mortgage payers. We can reasonably make a connection between a fall in income and foreclosures and defaults.

-Confusing cause and effect. Most people don’t default to get more money; they default because they have run out of money.

When your income plummets — in 15 million case above, by 100% — you stop spending except for necessities. The majority of hard working Americans who are unemployed (or under employed) and who are delinquent on their mortgages because they have run out of money. Merely failing to pay that liability, does not men you therefore have lots of extra cash burning a hole in your pocket.

- Therefore, Liabilities — what is owed by defaulting homeowners — are not the same as Disposable Income. Not paying that liability is not a windfall — its a sign of economic distress. That $60 billion is a collective measure of how much homeowners owe, not how much they have.

And this is coming from me, the guy who advocated that the economy needs more foreclosures . . .

The second item was from Minyanville’s James Kostohryz. He blamed the idea on Perma-Bears, stating they are “running out of excuses for why retail sales rose so strongly in March of 2010” (Are Mortgage Deadbeats Juicing Up the Economic Numbers?).

But James takes it a step further, crunching the numbers to determine, if true, how much this could be impacting spending. His conclusion? The most that strategic defaults are helping retail sales is about $228 million per month — “~0.026% of monthly Personal Consumption Expenditures (PCE) which are averaging about $863 billion per month.” Hardly enough to explain the significant uptick in retail sales.

Read More

Category: Analysts, Consumer Spending, Credit, Retail

Howard Davidowitz: Recovery? What Recovery?

The inimitable Howard Davidowitz on whether he has been completely wrong over the past year and whether America is in the midst of a glorious recovery:

Category: Retail, Video

Watching the Growth of Walmart + Sam’s Club

Terrific visualization from Nathan at Flowing Data, who updates his Wal-Mart growth vid with the addition of Sam’s Club. Suggestion: How about a version of Apple Store growth the past decade? via Flowing Data

Category: Digital Media, Retail

Hardcover Best Sellers Paperback Spillover Effect

Here’s something interesting: Many of the books on the NYT hardcover business best sellers list are causing a nice spillover effect on the paperback business best sellers list. Consider these hardcover books: 1. THE BIG SHORT, by Michael Lewis (2010) 4. OUTLIERS, by Malcolm Gladwell (2008) 9. SUPERFREAKONOMICS, by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J….Read More

Category: Retail

Counter-Cyclical Spending (during recessions)

One of the things I hate about a secular bull market — especially towards its rampaging tail end — is how everyone and everything gets silly. Money and champagne flows, conspicuous consumption is on full display. I recall people — literally — dancing on bars during the late 90s in NYC. To be sure, Fed…Read More

Category: Consumer Spending, Cycles, Psychology, Retail

February’s Most Popular Books on TBP

One of the cool things about Amazon is the ability to track what gets purchased when referred from the site. For privacy reasons, I only know what was purchased, not by who — so whoever bought Ginger Lynn’s The Pleasure Hunt video, your secret is safe). I find it intriguing to see which books were…Read More

Category: Bailout Nation, Retail

Economic Cheat Sheet: Using Retail Sales to Forecast GDP & NFP

Of all the various economic indicators and data points out there, is there one that has any special ability to forecast future economic activity? Or defined more broadly, what gives the best insight into future GDP ? That is the question Dave Livingston of Llinlithgow Associates (he blogs at BizzXceleration) was considering perusing when he…Read More

Category: Economy, Retail

Is Patrick Byrne America’s Nastiest Dumbest CEO?

Our story so far: Back on December 9th, my young niece informed me (via Facebook) that she had discovered her name publicly posted on a DeepCapture website. That was the first discovery of the “Facebook Friends scraping” operation. My assumption was that the asshats at DeepCapture had exploited a Facebook security lapse, and grabbed all…Read More

Category: Legal, Really, really bad calls, Retail