Posts filed under “Science”

GE on Energy & Dynamic Braking

From GE.com:

Energy: you can’t destroy it, but you can certainly waste it. That’s what most motorized vehicles do, including trains. Usually, the energy generated when you stop a moving vehicle is dissipated as heat, and is lost to the atmosphere. With GE’s ecomagination we’ve discovered that you can capture and store that energy, then reuse it – that’s how our hybrid systems work. Watch the video to see a simple illustration of the physics behind dynamic braking. Keep in mind an object’s force is measured in Newtons, using the equation “force = mass * acceleration.”

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Hat tip Flowing Data

Category: Science, Video

History of Atmospheric Carbon Changes

Huge NYT article on Charles David Keeling, the scientist who first measured the increased carbon in the atmosphere. The Keeling curve, as its now known, shows a steady increase in CO2 concentrations in our air over the past century. Keeling also discovered the seasonal variations of CO2 in the atmosphere. I thought the biography of…Read More

Category: Data Analysis, Quantitative, Science

Lunar Eclipse + Winter Solstice = Awesome

According to NASA: “This lunar eclipse falls on the date of the northern winter solstice. How rare is that? Total lunar eclipses in northern winter are fairly common. There have been three of them in the past ten years alone. A lunar eclipse smack-dab on the date of the solstice, however, is unusual. Geoff Chester…Read More

Category: Science, Weekend

Ten Questions Science Must Answer

For 350 years, the Royal Society has called on the world’s biggest brains to unravel the mysteries of science. Its president, Martin Rees, considers today’s big issues, while leading thinkers describe the puzzles they would love to see solved. The 10 big questions What is consciousness? What happened before the big bang? Will science and…Read More

Category: Science, Weekend

Your Brain is Beautiful (And Your Neurons Are Particularly Attractive)

From the NYT, these electron microscopy photos are strangely beautiful: The last few decades have produced an explosion of new techniques for probing the blobby, unprepossessing brain in search of the thinking, feeling, suffering, scheming mind. But the field remains technologically complicated, out of reach for the average nonscientist, and still defined by research so…Read More

Category: Science, Weekend

Solar Furnace Research Facility

Fun with Science: Jem Stansfield travels to the Solar Furnace Research Facility in Southern France. He witnesses the incredible power generated by highly concentrated sunlight. http://www.bbc.co.uk/bang

Category: Science, Weekend

New Elementary Particle Discovered (maybe)

Physics: Where we learn that the possible discovery of a fourth neutrino could help explain dark matter.

Dope:

“Physicists working with a Fermilab neutrino experiment may have found a new elementary particle whose behavior breaks the known laws of physics. If correct, their results poke holes in the accepted Standard Model of particles and forces, and raise some interesting questions for the Large Hadron Collider and Tevatron experiments. The new particle could even explain the existence of dark matter.

Working with Fermilab’s MiniBooNE experiment — the first part of the larger planned Booster Neutrino Experiment — physicists found evidence for a fourth flavor of neutrino, according to a new paper published in Physical Review Letters. This means there could be another particle we didn’t know about, and that it behaves in a way physicists didn’t expect.

-Popular Science

Laws of Physics were made to be broken! (More Sciencey stuff after the jump)

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Category: Science, Weekend

Animators of Life: Where Cinema and Biology Meet

http://www.youtube.com/user/XVIVOAnimation Dr. Lue is one of the pioneers of molecular animation, a rapidly growing field that seeks to bring the power of cinema to biology. Building on decades of research and mountains of data, scientists and animators are now recreating in vivid detail the complex inner machinery of living cells. The field has spawned a…Read More

Category: Science, Weekend

My Brilliant Brain

From National Geographic:

Part 1 – Born Genius

Part 2 – Make Me A Genius

Category: Psychology, Science, Video

Steven Johnson: Where Good Ideas Come From

I love that he lifted RSI’s animated approach: Beginning with Charles Darwin’s first encounter with the teeming ecosystem of the coral reef and drawing connections to the intellectual hyperproductivity of modern megacities and to the instant success of YouTube, Johnson shows us that the question we need to ask is, What kind of environment fosters…Read More

Category: Science, Weekend