Posts filed under “Taxes and Policy”

America’s Corporate Welfare Queens

It seems that welfare queens are back in the news these days. The old stereotype was an inner-city unwed mother — that’s dog-whistle-speak for black — having multiple babies to get ever bigger welfare checks (throw in a new Cadillac and the myth is complete). Regardless, welfare reform of the 1990s ended that narrative.

No, the new welfare queens are even bigger, richer and less deserving of taxpayer support. The two biggest welfare queens in America today are Wal-Mart and McDonald’s.

This issue has become more known as we learn just how far some companies have gone in putting their employees on public assistance. According to one study, American fast food workers receive more than $7 billion dollars in public assistance. As it turns out, McDonald’s has a “McResource” line that helps employees and their families enroll in various state and local assistance programs. It exploded into the public when a recording of the McResource line advocated that full-time employees sign up for food stamps and welfare.

Wal-Mart, the nation’s largest private sector employer, is also the biggest consumer of taxpayer supported aid. According to Florida Congressman Alan Grayson, in many states, Wal-Mart employees are the largest group of Medicaid recipients. They are also the single biggest group of food stamp recipients. Wal-mart’s “associates” are paid so little, according to Grayson, that they receive $1,000 on average in public assistance. These amount to massive taxpayer subsidies for private companies.

Why are profitable, dividend-paying firms receiving taxpayer subsidies? The short answer is, because they can. The longer answer is more complex and nuanced.

Both McDonald’s and Wal-Mart are engaging in perfectly legal behavior. The system was set up long ago in ways that failed to imagine companies doing this. Yes, they are taking advantage of the taxpayer, but they are also operating within the law.

Which means it is time to change those outdated rules.

The simplest solution is to raise the minimum wage. If full-time employees are living below the poverty level — especially those with children — its no surprise they are going to need public assistance. Raising the minimum wage over a period of time will eliminate much of this corporate welfare. The costs will be slightly higher prices at fast food restaurants and low end retailers.

The next proposal is more severe: Charge back the amount of public assistance any employee receives to the company he or she works for. It would be separate from tax filings, and simply be a direct penalty charged to the firm. I doubt there is much political will for this proposal, but I can see some people — especially on the Left — supporting it.

The most radical idea is bit of pure fantasy: Guarantee every person in America a minimum salary. That is a proposal under discussion today in Switzerland. Its hard to even imagine such a concept gaining traction in the U.S. outside of the Great Depression era.

My politics are pretty middle-of-the-road, and I find myself offended by subsidizing profitable companies this way. As a taxpayer, there are much better things I would like to see my monies go towards. Some rule changes are needed to end this wasteful spending.

We should get corporate welfare queens off of the public teat. Regardless of your politics, it is an issue that politicians on both the Left and the Right can agree upon.

 

 

 

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Originally published — plus 643 comments — here

 

Category: Really, really bad calls, Taxes and Policy

Tax Rates, Inequality, and US Deficits

Its Friday, after what was for me a long and annoying 17 days. But the shutdown is over, US markets are at all time highs, and Bob Shiller got his Nobel (more on this tomorrow). You might think that I would be at peace with the current state of the world, but life is never…Read More

Category: Economy, Mathematics, Philosophy, Taxes and Policy

How the Government Pays Its Debt

Click for interactive graphic Source: Washington Post

Category: Politics, Taxes and Policy

Screwed By SCRIE Screed

@TBPInvictus I recently got an education on a loophole in a NYC program that is designed to protect seniors on fixed incomes from rising rents. The Senior Citizen Rent Increase Exemption Program claims that: “Tenants who qualify for the Senior Citizen Rent Increase Exemption (SCRIE) Program can have their rent frozen at their current level and…Read More

Category: Legal, Politics, Really, really bad calls, Taxes and Policy

How to Preserve a Family Fortune Through Tax Tricks

Click to enlarge Source: Bloomberg

Category: Digital Media, Taxes and Policy

The United States must raise infrastructure spending by 1 percentage point of GDP to meet future needs   Click to enlarge Source: McKinsey

Category: Economy, Taxes and Policy

Jeremy Grantham on Our Debt Solution (Charlie Rose)

Charlie Rose, March 12 2013: Jeremy Grantham, co-founder and Chief Investment Strategist of Grantham Mayo Van Otterloo (GMO), discusses investing in a low-growth world and the outlook for the US economy.

Category: Credit, Taxes and Policy, Video

Rising interest rates could mean the window to fix infrastructure on the cheap is closing Barry Ritholtz, Washington Post, July 12     Thanks to the Federal Reserve’s zero interest rates and quantitative easing policies, borrowing costs are near generational lows. The costs of funding the repair and renovation of America’s decaying infrastructure are as…Read More

Category: Fixed Income/Interest Rates, Taxes and Policy

Public Social Service Spending by Nation

France spends the most, America spends the least, most of Europe is in the middle:

Read More

Category: Taxes and Policy, Video

Corporate Tax-Avoidance Maps

Maps of corporate tax-avoidance   click for interactive maps Source: OpenCorporates   Fascinating exploration of how various banks duck paying taxes in the US.   Hat tip boingboing

Category: Corporate Management, Digital Media, Taxes and Policy