Posts filed under “Think Tank”

The Statistical Recovery, Part Three

The Statistical Recovery, Part Three
Capacity Utilization Set to Rise
A Real Estate Green Shoot?
The Deleveraging Society
Some Thoughts on Secular Bear Markets
Weddings and Ten Years of Thoughts From the Frontline

This week we further explore why this recovery will be a Statistical Recovery, or one that, as someone said, is a recovery only a statistician could love. We look at capacity utilization, more on housing, some thoughts on debt and deflation, and some intriguing charts on volatility in the last secular bear-market cycle. This letter will print a little longer, but there are lots of charts. I have written this during the week, and I finish it here in Tulsa, where Amanda gets married tomorrow. (There is no deflation in weddings costs!)

Thanks to so many of you for your enthusiastic feedback about my latest Accredited Investor Newsletter, in which I undertook to examine the impact of last year’s dramatic increase in volatility on the performance of hedge funds and to ascertain those elements that led to success in the industry, such as select Global Macro and Managed Futures strategies, as well as the challenges. If you are an accredited investor (basically anywhere in the world, as I have partners in Europe, Canada, Africa, and Latin America) and haven’t yet read my analysis, I invite you to sign up here: www.accreditedinvestor.ws

For those of you who seek to take advantage of these themes and the developments I write about each week, let me again mention my good friend Jon Sundt at Altegris Investments, who is my US partner. Jon and his team have recently added some of the more successful names in the industry to their dedicated platform of alternative investments, including commodity pools, hedge funds, and managed futures accounts. Certain products that Altegris makes available on its platform access award-winning managers, and are designed to facilitate access for qualified and suitable readers at sometimes lower investment minimums than is normally required (though the net-worth requirements are still the same).

If you haven’t spoken with them in a while, it’s worth checking out their new lineup of world-class managers. Jon also tells me they just added yet more brilliant minds to their research team, making it, in my opinion, one of the foremost teams in the industry, focused solely on alternative investments. I invite you to have a conversation with one of their professional and seasoned advisors. (In this regard, I am president and a registered representative of Millennium Wave Securities, LLC, member FINRA.) Now, let’s jump into the Statistical Recovery.

Capacity Utilization Set to Rise

Capacity utilization is a concept in economics that refers to the extent to which an enterprise or a nation actually uses its installed productive capacity. Thus, it refers to the relationship between actual output that is produced with the installed equipment and the potential output that could be produced with it, if capacity was fully used.

The chart below shows that capacity utilization in the US is at an all-time low, around 68%. That means that with the equipment we already have in place we could produce almost 50% more goods than we are now producing. However, most analysts think that 80% capacity utilization is a very good number.

If you look very closely at the bottom right-hand detail, you can see that there is a small uptick in last month’s data. Whether or not this is the “bottom” remains to be seen. But if it is not the bottom, it is close. You can only shut down so much production before inventories fall to levels that require restocking. And we are getting close to that level in many industries.

jm082109image001

Before we wander too far away from the graph, I want you to notice that past dips (circa the recessions of 1968, ’74, and ’80-’82) had V-shaped recoveries in capacity utilization. But in the 1990-91 recession it took longer than it did in past recessions, and in the most recent recession (2000-02) the recovery took longer and we did not actually “recover” for four years.

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Category: Think Tank

Existing Home Sales

July Existing Home Sales, 85% of the housing market and a measure of actual closings, totaled 5.24mm annualized, 240k more than expected and the highest since Aug ’07. The inventory to sales ratio though remained unchanged at 9.4 months because the improvement in single family homes to 8.6 from 8.9 was offset by a spike…Read More

Category: MacroNotes

Chart of the Day: S&P500 P/E Ratio

Today’s chart illustrates how the recent plunge in earnings has impacted the current valuation of the stock market as measured by the price to earnings ratio (PE ratio). Generally speaking, when the PE ratio is high, stocks are considered to be expensive. When the PE ratio is low, stocks are considered to be inexpensive. From…Read More

Category: Earnings, Technical Analysis, Think Tank, Valuation

King Report: Phony Philly Forecast

> Is Bernanke purposely aiding & abetting the usual market manipulation that occurs during expiration week? In July, Ben poured $80.2B into the system, mostly by monetizing MBS, during expiration week, igniting a huge rally. The Fed balance sheet contracted for most of June and July before Ben’s gambit. For the week ended Wednesday, Ben…Read More

Category: Markets, Think Tank

Memories, Light the Corners of My Mind

“Memories, like the corners of my mind. Misty water colored memories, of the Way We Were,” sang Barbra Streisand and I’ll be humming the song as Bernanke gives a speech today titled “Reflections on a Year of Crisis” at 10am from Jackson Hole. Unfortunately the trip down memory lane won’t begin in mid ’03 when…Read More

Category: MacroNotes

JD Power quantifies the impact of the Clunker program

J.D. Power and Associates today is quantifying in their estimation the impact on auto sales this year due to the clunker program and the extent that it steals sales from 2010. They said that based on data seen thus far, August will see the first 1mm+ unit sales (includes fleet sales) month since last year….Read More

Category: MacroNotes

Bob Novak (1931-2009), The Last Reporter

My father Richard Whalen was a long time friend and contemporary of Robert Novak, whose funeral is tomorrow in Washington.  I knew Bob and his family growing up in Washington and even went on some memorable fishing trips off of Ocean City, MD.   Dad wrote the following remembrance of Bob earlier this week.  — Chris

By Richard Whalen

I knew Bob Novak for almost fifty years.  I first met him in Washington, D.C. when he was a member of the Wall Street Journal Washington’s bureau and I was a New York based Wall Street Journal editorial writer assigned to write an editorial page article on Republican politics.  Bob, defending his Washington turf, asked me what I was doing in DC.  After shouting at each other, we had a drink and then another and a third and by that time, Bob helped me outline my piece.  We became great friends – best friends.

As the media elite emerged as part of Washington’s permanent government in the 1970s, Bob was at the center of it, but he resisted the social phoniness like a true son of the working class from Joliet, IL.  He was determined to keep the realistic perspective of his father, an intelligent small businessman who was quietly proud of his celebrated son. .Bob was in the special category occupied earlier by Arthur Krock, David Lawrence and Walter Lippmann. He was not a pundit but a hard-nosed, hard-working, shoe leather reporter whose sources ranged wider and deeper than anybody else’s. He distilled truth from depths of fresh reporting.
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Category: Think Tank

BiModality of Markets: Why Mean-Variance Doesn’t Work

Via Bob Bronson, we get this very interesting way to think about the potential universe of market returns: In addition to the almost universally improper use of the correlation function that we have presented before (our Correlation Puzzle is available on request), Alpha-Beta, Efficient Frontier, Black Scholes, VaR, stochastic modeling, and exotic derivatives from Modern…Read More

Category: Mathematics, Think Tank

Philly Fed survey

The August Philly Fed survey came in at +4.2, above the consensus of -2.0, up from -7.5 in July and follows the unexpected gain in the Empire survey seen on Monday. It’s the first positive reading since September ’08 and is at the highest level since November ’07. The data measures the direction of improvement,…Read More

Category: MacroNotes

Jobless Claims data

Initial Jobless Claims totaled 576k, 26k more than expected and up 15k from the prior week which was revised up by 3k. This brings the 4 week average up to 570k from 566k. Continuing Claims were 26k more than estimated and up 2k from last week. The insured unemployment rate was 4.7%, unchanged with the…Read More

Category: MacroNotes