Posts filed under “Trading”

Margin Debt Hits an All-Time High . . . So What?

Every now and again, a way of looking at markets suddenly gains traction. Data gets assembled, analyzed, reviewed. Eventually, it becomes the basis of traders’ decision-making process. It even can become part of Wall Street lore.

The problem that arises all too often is that this approach is statistically bogus. The data gets cherry picked; backward-looking analysis gets form-fitted to what just happened and has no meaning for what is most likely to happen in the future. Confirmation bias and selective perception can lead an investor to lose objectivity, choosing an approach that justifies an existing portfolio mix, as opposed to objectively evaluating the data.

Consider as an example the ominous-sounding Hindenburg Omen, a technical analysis that purports to signal the likelihood of a market crash. That’s exactly what it’s been doing — unsuccessfully — since 2010. This sort of recession porn allows people to confirm their existing prejudices. After five years of money-losing forecasts, theHindenburg Omen’s following among traders is fading.

But many other dubious or disproven metrics are still out there. Consider the Murdoch Indicator, or the Super Bowl Indicator, or theMascot Indicator or even the Ticker Tape Parade Indicator. A decade ago, I termed this phenomenon YAII – for Yet Another Idiotic Indicator.

The most recent such metric? New York Stock Exchange margin debt. (Margin debt is when an investor borrows against the stocks he owns to buy more shares.) Margin debt has reached an all-time high and, as we have been told repeatedly, this is a fatal sign for markets.

There are two problems with this: The first, and lazier criticism, is to point out that analysts have been discussing the danger of this for at least the past four years (see chart below from two years ago). Margin debt was cited as a precursor to doom in 2011 and 2013 and last yearand again a few days ago.


The more substantive analysis is to note that this is a correlationwithout much predictive value. It is a coincidental, not a leading indicator. Check the historical data and you will find it gives little warning of an imminent market crash.

Let’s delve into the details:


Continues here: A Market Indicator That Predicts Nothing



Category: Analysts, Really, really bad calls, Technical Analysis, Trading

How Spoofing Works

Source: WSJ

Category: Markets, Regulation, Technology, Trading

The Market Rhythm Deciphered

Source: @Trader_Dante

Category: Cycles, Humor, Psychology, Trading

Spoofing & the Flash Crash

Earlier this week a trader was arrested in London and accused of “spoofing.” What’s spoofing and what does it have to do 2010 flash crash? Bloomberg View’s Matt Levine explains

How ‘Spoofing’ Might Have Crashed the Market

Read More

Category: Legal, Trading, Video

Nikkei Dow > 20,000

Great discussion from my pal Peter Boockvar of the Lindsey Group on Japan: The Nikkei closed above 20,000 for the first time since April 2000. Optimism for corporate profitability, higher ROE’s, better corporate governance and a greater focus on satisfying shareholders, along with QE and a weak yen continues to drive performance that will likely…Read More

Category: Markets, Trading

Survey Says…

Joseph Saluzzi ( and Sal L. Arnuk ( are co-heads of the equity trading desk at Themis Trading LLC (, an independent, no conflict agency brokerage firm specializing in trading listed and OTC equities for institutions. Prior to founding Themis, Sal and Joe worked for more than 10 years at Instinet Corporation, pioneers in the…Read More

Category: Markets, Regulation, Think Tank, Trading

Gold Turns Negative Year-to-Date; Stocks to Follow

Equity markets started off this year by falling. They rallied in February, working their way back into the green. The Standard & Poor’s 500 Index now is up about 1 percent for the year. Gold has traveled the opposite path: The yellow metal began at about $1,175 an ounce. By Jan. 23, it had rallied…Read More

Category: Cognitive Foibles, Gold & Precious Metals, Really, really bad calls, Trading

Interactions among high-frequency traders

Category: Regulation, Think Tank, Trading

History of High-Frequency Trading

Source: Investoo

Category: Digital Media, Quantitative, Trading

Why Gold & Oil Are Trading So Differently

Category: Commodities, Energy, ETFs, Gold & Precious Metals, Media, Technical Analysis, Trading, Video